The shed we built rests on a foundation made up of 12 solid-concrete blocks. The 4 x 8 x 16-in. blocks are arranged in three rows spaced 59 in. apart. These blocks are typically set directly on the ground, but we put down a 4-in. bed of gravel first because our site occasionally receives groundwater. The gravel will keep the soil beneath the shed from eroding or becoming soggy.
For those who don’t quite believe in My Shed Plans, they offer a 60 day trial. If within those 60 days, you feel like the product hasn’t lived up to its hype, you may return it and receive a full refund. A decent outdoor shed can be built in a week or two depending on your schedule, and the amount of time you have to build it. Therefore, 60 days is enough for you to test out the product and see what you come up with. If you have a shed worthy of showing off to your buddies, or gal pals, then keep it. If you have a heap of materials in a pile that resembles something Homer Simpson might have created, then return it. No big deal.
Once you decide that adding a shed will increase the enjoyment of your outdoor space, it’s time to ask pertinent questions to assess your needs. Consider exactly how you want to use your shed, what design will best suit those tasks, and how much your budget will allow. Learn what features are most popular, and why. Also research what’s really involved with building a shed yourself, as opposed to hiring a pro to do the job, and be sure you understand such important factors as warranty and delivery.
When buying the lumber, you should select the planks with great care, making sure they are straight and without any visible flaws (cracks, knots, twists, decay). Investing in cedar or other weather resistant lumber is a good idea, as it will pay off on the long run. Use a spirit level to plumb and align the components, before inserting the galvanized screws, otherwise the project won’t have a symmetrical look. If you have all the materials and tools required for the project, you could get the job done in about a day.
I like to use the hip roof design, it is pleasing to the eye, it is the best roof for high winds, certainlly a good idea with the hurricanes and tropical storms found in South Florida. I always build my sheds on a raised concrete slab for stability, I also use double hurricane ties. All studs and rafters are pressure treated because of the area's termite problems. I always anchor the shed to the concrete slab with expoy bolts. I never use T11 siding it does not hold up well in a subtropical climate. I use OSB under the siding and I often cross brace. I prefer a metal roof screwed down not nailed using water gasket screws. I generally use ridge vents or a wind turbine to help cool the shed and I also use Bahama shutters for the same reason. I build with rafters not trusses so I can keep the celling open to also cool the shed. This makes the shed expensive but after twenty years of use one of my oldest sheds which received proper up keep is still perfect. So which is cheaper one shed for life or one after every major windstorm? I know the answer because I had one shed stand up to a huricane!
The last project we want to share with you today is a greenhouse/ garden shed which we found on lizmarieblog. It’s really cute and inside you can find shelves, storage compartments and a bunch of other practical things. In addition to all that, this lovely shed even has a chandelier. It’s a decorative element and it really elevates the decor to a whole new level.
With the wall in position, secure it by screwing down through the bottom 2 x 4 plate and into the floor framing. Frame and erect the rear wall, followed by the front wall. Then, install the interior partition. If you're including a playroom, as we did, cover the partition side that faces that room with plywood, and screw it in place. Then install the final wall.
Wooden sheds have a characteristic look that can mix in well with the environment In spite of the quality of wood, after some time, untreated and ignored wood can decay, split, twist or wind up noticeably powerless to form and mould, so wood sheds ought to be dealt with for insurance with stain and varnish. Wood sheds require regular support. This incorporates keeping plant matter, flotsam and jetsam from heaping up adjacent to the dividers and on the rooftop, and infrequent decay sealing with the additive.

Apparently, most guides provide you with the same old information that doesn’t offer any benefits to a gardening or DIY enthusiast. Fortunately, you can benefit from programs like My Shed Plans. This exceptional program is easily available on the internet at an affordable price, and helps you learn everything about building a shed in your garden or backyard.


No shed, regardless of how well it's built, will last long if it's set on a weak base. Most sheds can be supported by an on-grade foundation, which consists of solid concrete blocks or pressure-treated wood timbers set directly on the ground. The concrete blocks or timbers (aka skids) must be leveled and spaced closely enough to properly support the shed's floor frame. Note that it's important to use solid concrete blocks, not hollow wall blocks, which can easily crack.
• Lack of harmony — building a shed that does not match the design or the color of your house would make the compound look a bit odd. It is advisable that you choose a suitable architectural design and color that will closely match with your house. That gives your compound a great look and also makes it look like both structures were built at the same time. It also gives you a sense of satisfaction and hence you will not have to waste money in the future to make one structure resemble the other.
Before we can finish the base we need to get the electrical ready.  Put a peice of conduit over your electrical wire to protect it from any damage it could receive while you are finishing the base and to give the shed a more finished look.  Make sure the pipe and wire inside are pointing up perpendicular to the ground and are preferably going straight to the location where your first outlet will be.

Think of a shed as a useful multipurpose addition to the backyard. You could use it to store shovels and gardening supplies or all the bbq supplies. It doesn’t need to be big. In fact, a tiny shed like the one featured on ana-white should be enough. Check out the tutorial and the shed plans to find out everything you need to know about this project. If you decide to build your own garden shed, you’ll need the following supplies: 2 sheets of plywood, some wooden boards, hinges, handles, a latch, galvanized nails, roofing, wood glue and materials for the doors.

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