You can even go online and look up prices!  For example, if you visit lowes.com, they have a search box where you can enter in the item and find out each price!  This will save you some time.  The only drawback I see to this is that I find it really beneficial to go to these big box lumber stores and see exactly what I want.  For example, the LP Smartside siding panels I recommend to use:  some stores carry a cheap variation of these that have a brown color to them on the inside of the panel, and this is not what you want!  The have the consistency of a 'fibre' panel that will crack easy.  The true LP siding panels are pre-primed on the outside surface and have a natural osb color on the inside surface.
My advice... Don't do-it-all-yourself. Novice and pro alike can benefit from each other in DIY. You might have the shed location leveled by a landscaper; get a referral to outsource the shed's foundation to a building subcontractor; you can even have the roof's trusses made by a local truss company and the shingles installed by a handyman or roofer.
For example, the last three sheds I built were trimmed with white PVC trim boards instead of painted cedar 1 x 4s. This new plastic lumber, which I used for the rake, fascia, frieze and corner boards, is impervious to bugs, warping, splitting or decay, and it never needs painting. Other low-maintenance options include: vinyl or aluminum windows, faux-slate roof shingles, fiberglass or steel doors, composite decking for steps, and fiber-cement siding. (I don't usually recommend aluminum or vinyl siding for sheds; neither material is rugged enough to survive the inevitable beating outbuildings take.)

You can cut steel roofing panels with a circular saw and a carbide blade, but it’ll save you a lot of work if you order the panels the right length to start with. Plus, you’ll have a greater color selection if you order the roofing rather than buy off-the-shelf panels. Remember to order in advance, though, since it usually takes several weeks for the roofing to arrive. And make sure the overhangs are the right size so the panels will overhang the fascia slightly.


Do not make the mistake of not building your own shed because you have never done it before. With the right shed plans you will get the same results the experts get. Begin by choosing plans you feel comfortable with and know you can follow along. Simply follow the steps provided, measure correctly, and in no time you will construct your own shed. Study the building guide to get familiar with all the steps and to get to know the names of all the parts.
Because the shed is designed to abut to another structure, the foundation need only be pressure-treated skids, the roof pitched in only one direction to shed water, and the back wall sheathed with 1/2-inch CDX plywood, which withstands indirect exposure to moisture. See Anatomy of an Outdoor Shed or Playhouse for more about typical shed construction.
One last thing about shed sizes, it’s a good idea to always measure out the dimensions in your own garden before you invest any money. You can do this easily by using a couple of stakes and a string to measure out the space. That’s how the pros do it. Make sure that you leave enough room on all sides of the shed to help with rain drainage and prevent water damage.
Figure G shows details for the marking jig. Photo 12 shows how to use this setup to draw the curves for the window pieces. Next cut the side pieces (Figure F). Set the side pieces in place over the top of the header and mark the angled cuts (Photo 13). Finish the curved trim piece by first cutting the angles on each end, and then sawing the curves with a jigsaw and sanding them smooth. Use the marking jig to lay out the curved brace, too (Figure G).
When building the floor frame, which includes the mudsill, floor joists and perimeter band joists, use 2 x 6 or 2 x 8 pressure-treated lumber. Many prefab sheds use untreated construction-grade lumber for the floor frame, which is fine--if you plan to keep your shed indoors. Even in ideal conditions on the perfect site, a shed floor will be exposed to some moisture, and in time, untreated lumber will rot.
The toughest and most important part of building a shed is finding the right plans. Sure you can just start building without plans, but do you know how it will look when you are done? Or you can search for free plans, but are they designed right? What I recommend is finding plans, even if it means you have to pay a little. Make sure that sample plans are provided so you know what you are getting. Do not make a purchase just because they show lots of nice sheds but no sample of the actual plans you will be buying. Look for the following before you decide to purchase:
Build your own shed and you'll instantly have increased space for your tools, a place to work on DIY projects and a way to keep your garage free of clutter. There are many shed plans online that show you how to build your own shed from scratch using wood. It may be easier, however, to use a kit to create a resin, metal or plastic shed instead. A storage shed kit contains all the materials you need including trim. This Home Depot project uses the Keter Stronghold Resin Shed Kit to show you how to build a shed from a kit. We also offer a large variety of other types of shed designs to choose from. Like most, this DIY shed requires tools like a power drill and step ladder to put it together, but assembly instructions will vary by kit. Make sure to follow the manufacturer's instructions carefully.
Any person interested in the field of woodworking will tell you how much time and effort it goes into building a wood project. And even after putting in so much effort, the chances of mistakes and failures are pretty high. So much so, that after a time you will feel like giving up altogether. Most people spend a lot of time and money on their first shed project and often end up frustrated because what they finally create is nothing like they wanted to. Why? The measurements were all screwed up! If that sounds like your story, it is finally going to change.  With Ryan’s collection of shed plans in your arsenal, you will never ever have to look for shed plans anywhere else.

Shed are also great if you have a hobby. For example, if you’re passionate about pottery, gardening or even painting, you could use the garden shed as your private workspace. You can give it windows if you think you’ll need natural light inside. In fact, this can be an opportunity to upcycle some old windows and doors. Check out this project that we found on countryliving to see how this chic shed was built.
When you nail on the siding, make sure it overhangs the framing on each side by 3-1/2 in. and that you’ve trimmed off the top corner to follow the slope of the angled top plate (Photo 2). Attach the siding with 2-in. galvanized or stainless steel ring-shank siding nails placed 8 in. apart along studs and 6 in. apart along the edges of the sheets. You’ll have to nail blocking between the studs to support the top edge of the siding and the Z-flashing.
So it's not surprising that people often ask me for advice about putting together a backyard storage building. Sometimes I get asked questions that I couldn't possibly answer: "Do you think my husband and brother-in-law can build me a garden shed?" Or, "Would an 8 x 10-ft. shed be big enough to store all my stuff?" Gee, ma'am, I couldn't say. But often, the questions have something to do with shed design, framing or siding options. There, I can help. And so with these inquisitive souls in mind I present my favorite tricks of the shed trade.

The program consists of a wide range of downloadable files, which contain many different step by step instructions and plans related to woodworking. These tutorials are focused on a wide range of projects, such as potting shed plans, wood shed plans, storage shed plans, garage storage plans, house plans and more. All the shed plans discussed in this program are divided on the basis of each project type.

With that kind of quantity, there are indeed a lot of good designs that you can find in this pack. However, the absurd amount of content is abundant for all level of woodworkers. The drawings are exclusively technical with the bonus materials which make the package, a lifetime one. The designs in this package are brainstorming. As an amateur carpenter, I’m starting from a point where I haven’t taught of building design; I came a long way and half of the credit goes to Ryan Shed Plans. The shed plans provided here are very original and indeed are fun to build if you can combine a lot of plans into one.​


Think of a shed as a useful multipurpose addition to the backyard. You could use it to store shovels and gardening supplies or all the bbq supplies. It doesn’t need to be big. In fact, a tiny shed like the one featured on ana-white should be enough. Check out the tutorial and the shed plans to find out everything you need to know about this project. If you decide to build your own garden shed, you’ll need the following supplies: 2 sheets of plywood, some wooden boards, hinges, handles, a latch, galvanized nails, roofing, wood glue and materials for the doors.

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