Building a shed has lots of advantages which can vary for each person. For example, you could use the shed as a storage space for bicycles in winter. Another option is to use the shed as a storage space for large equipment like the lawnmower or the garden tools. You could also use the shed as a workspace whenever you’re doing DIY projects which is quite funny because the shed itself can be one such project. If you’re the recycling type, you can put a hatch on the side specifically for this purpose and place the bins inside. In any case, a sturdy shed can serve you for many years to come and the shed plans offered on todaysplans show you how to ensure that.
Modern Sheds are defined by their clean and simple looks. They are perfect to be used as a home office, work studio or even a cool place to store things. With lots of windows, a simple low slope metal roof and horizontal siding, these plans are a great way to build a professional work space right in your back yard. Building a home office or work studio in your backyard will eliminate the commute to work and at the same time give you a quiet professional place to work and bring clients.
In a Vero Beach, Florida, midcentury modern neighborhood, Sanders Pace Architecture retained the lines and essence of the original house while redesigning it for their client's 21st-century lifestyle. Although it's at the front of the house and initially might resemble a garage, the detached "shed" can be used as a private studio or for guests. Because it's located on the coast, hurricane-proof doors were needed, but cedar was installed over them for an attractive but sturdy structure.
At times, this information may seem overwhelming. You need to consider buying a program that provides you with all the information in a simple and concise manner. It is important to understand the value of your effort, money and time. One of the most common and biggest problems with online tutorials and guides is that they give just a glimpse of what you are buying. Thus, you don’t have a clear idea of what you are getting into.
By searching online you can find some free shed plans that are decent. Most often though these plans will be geared towards more experienced builders and they will not be very detailed. If you are a first time builder look for plans you can understand, even if it means paying a little. Use plans that contain a material list and plenty of details if this is your first time. Most free plans available are not as detailed with the building steps, so free is not always a good idea. If you go to the top of this page I have provided a list of some of the best plans from reputable websites.
The framing is the most important part of the above-ground structure because it stiffens up the plywood boards and supports the roof.  You will need a lot of 2x4's, and a way to attach them.  We used this as an excuse to buy some new air hammers from canadian tire.  We were able to get the lumber for the entire project delivered by a company called Tamrack Lumber.  They brought out a truck and dropped off all the supplies.  For the roofing you will need little plates with groups of nails sticking out of them which I believe are called joist plates.  These are used on the angles to keep them from shifting.  The last thing you will need is a way to cut all of the 2x4's.  To do this we borrowed a very nice miter saw from a friend for a few days.  It is much easier if the cutting tool can cut on angles, otherwise you will be left to improvise when cutting the peices for the roof.
Water is wood's worst enemy. Given the right circumstance and enough time, excessive moisture can rot framing, warp floors and doors, corrode hinges and breed mold and mildew. Fortunately, there's an easy remedy. First, be sure that the lowest wood member--the mudsill--is at least 6 in. above the ground. That's sufficient space to allow fresh air to circulate under the shed.
Run! Do not walk away from this product! Total scam! The Ryan Shed Plans product promises 12,000 different do it yourself shed building plans. Instead what you get is a whole bunch of disconnected sketches, drawings, And partial blueprints that he has photo copied from hundreds of unrelated sources. I personally have several years of carpentry, homebuilding, and woodworking experience So I assumed that even if these so-called “shed building plans” we’re light on specific details I’d still be able to use them. WRONG! You will find that 99% of the“Plans“ are completely useless for the purpose of building a backyard shed. After an hour of grinding through the files included in that on my download, I did happen upon a singly reasonably complete building plan for a modest shed which included detail dimensions, material list, and the sorts of things needed to actually build a shed. Doing a little more research, I later found where this particular we’ll Drawn to plan had been ripped off from another legitimate Shed building website. Shame on you RyanShedPlans for marketing such a terrible, useless product. Judging from your online sales pitch you are clearly a gifted marketer. If you spent as much time developing a database of legitimate, usable shed plans as you did putting together your totally fraudulent marketing material, you would have an incredible product worth much much more then you’re charging. But I guess you I already know that.
The program consists of a wide range of downloadable files, which contain many different step by step instructions and plans related to woodworking. These tutorials are focused on a wide range of projects, such as potting shed plans, wood shed plans, storage shed plans, garage storage plans, house plans and more. All the shed plans discussed in this program are divided on the basis of each project type.
Well, not these plans. You have the option of building a very functional and spacious lean-to shed on different foundations. Your foundation choices are a concrete slab, a wooden floor supported by concrete piers, or a wooden floor supported by skids. That lost option also means that your lean-to could be mobile as well so you won’t have to decide where you want to permanently put it.
Remember that anything you build will either add or detract from your property's appearance and may impact your property value. Metal and vinyl materials may be easier to maintain, but are the least expensive options and tend to look cheap. Natural wood and prefinished wood products will add character and value, but are typically more expensive to buy and maintain.

Make a template on the shed floor for assembling the trusses. Begin by laying out the parts for one truss. Align the bottom chord with the edge of the plywood floor. Then cut four 24-in.-long 2 x 4s. Lay two alongside each rafter and screw them to the plywood floor. Now use these short boards as stopblocks for laying out and assembling each truss. Fasten plywood gussets to each side of every truss with carpenter's glue and 1-in. roofing nails and set the trusses aside.

Sheds have become multipurpose, must-have buildings that are competing with pergolas and gazebos as your next backyard project. Pictures on social media only grab people's desires more. Before going any further, do your research. Figure out what you need it for and why, and whether you will build the shed yourself, or hire a pro. Check with your local planning department to comply with codes and guidelines. Determine if the shed will mirror the architectural features of your home--always a good idea. Assess your budget, materials needed, and the time it will take to complete the project.


For a freestanding shed, you can build the shed on top of a concrete slab (see Pouring a Concrete Slab) instead of the pressure-treated skids and floor joists; this will actually result in a sturdier—more permanent— structure. Otherwise, for a freestanding shed, the foundation should be constructed on concrete piers or poured footings (see Pouring Concrete Footings & Piers).  Be aware that building on footings will raise the height of the shed up from the ground.

This garden shed is the tiniest, but that’s the beauty of it – it’s exactly the right size to store your gardening tools. As there are more details (all in order to give you more storaging options), it might take a little longer to build this shed than the others, also the makers of the plan have said it cost around $400 to build this, but the shed is definitely one of a kind and worth the efforts.

After the concrete is all ready, the sole plates are then joined together with the anchor plates which protrude out of the foundation. Use the carpenter’s pencil and measuring tape to mark about one and a half inches from the board end continually every sixteen inches till the further end. These marks guide where the studs will be placed. Mark where the anchor and the mudsill meet up with a different marker from the one used initially. The studs are then taken and galvanized nails are driven through the marked areas into the center of the board until they reach the stud bottom. The studs should be secured to the baseboard.
When people talk about the different types of shed available, what they should describe are the different types of roof available, since sheds only really differ by the type of roof they have. We provide shed plans for three types of roof: Gable, Lean-To and Hip. Gable, Lean-To and Hip roofs each have their pros and cons. Gable roofs are the most common since they are simple to build and offer plenty of space. Lean-To sheds are popular too for confined spaces. Hip roof sheds are the most complex to build, but they are arguably the most desirable too since they have a more uniform appearance. In terms of shed size, you should choose one that fills the space you have in your yard but you should also consider the overhang for the roof. A 16X24 shed is big enough for vehicle storage and to be used as a workshop, while a 12X16 shed is perfect for storing all your yard tools and mechanical equipment. Sheds smaller than this are fine for basic storage. Gable, Lean-To and Hip roofs each have their pros and cons. Gable roofs are the most common since they are simple to build and offer plenty of space. Lean-to sheds are popular too for confined spaces. Hip roof sheds are the most complex to build, but they are arguably the most desirable too since they have a more uniform appearance. In terms of shed size, you should choose one that fills the space you have in your yard but you should also consider the overhang for the roof. A 16X24 shed is big enough for vehicle storage and to be used as a workshop, while a 12X16 shed is perfect for storing all your yard tools and mechanical equipment. Sheds smaller than this are fine for basic storage. Gable, Lean-To and Hip roofs each have their pros and cons. Gable roofs are the most common since they are simple to build and offer plenty of space. Lean-To sheds are popular too for confined spaces. Hip roof sheds are the most complex to build, but they are arguably the most desirable too since they have a more uniform appearance. In terms of shed size, you should choose one that fills the space you have in your yard but you should also consider the overhang for the roof. A 16X24 shed is big enough for vehicle storage and to be used as a workshop, while a 12X16 shed is perfect for storing all your yard tools and mechanical equipment. Sheds smaller than this are fine for basic storage.
Level the ground (if necessary) and install deck piers along a grid to support the shed. The piers will allow you to string support beams beneath the floor of the shed. In the example design, the piers are spaced 6 feet (1.8 m) apart in one direction and 4 feet (1.2 m) apart in the other for a total grid area of 12 x 8 feet. This is convenient because once you lay supports along this grid, it will take exactly three standard 4- by 8-foot plywood sheets to cover it.[1]

The plan features not only a cutting list and project diagram. There are also clear instructions starting from building the base and ending with installing the windows and doing the trims. Once you’ve built a small shed like this, you’ll have enough experience to build a bigger one that fits all the garden equipment as well. A tiny shed like this though is a necessary item for every home!


The walls of the foundation have been created and the electrical is all set, now all that needs to be done is to fill the gaping hole in between them with limestone agrigate.  We also threw in some concrete paving stones that we had lying around because we don't plan on using them and we had already tried to give them away.  After the limestone is in place tamp it down by jumping on it and keep filling up any places that are no longer level.  After the entire base is filled with as much limestone as you can fit put a sprinkler on to soak it and set it for the next hour or so.  You may need to add a bit more limestone after this is done as well.
×