When choosing where to build your shed, choose a flat dry spot on your property. This will make it easier to excavate and level it out, and ensure that you build on a dry surface. Avoid building your shed in a low lying area that is prone to water collection or you’ll find your shed flooded after a big rain. Too much water means rotting wood, blistering paint and rusty hinges and none of that will highlight how hard you worked to build this shed.
To be sure, the whole permitting process can be a bit intimidating. And, if I'm being honest here, I've never been comfortable dealing with the city and all their codes - seems they're always moving the line on me. But, I always make it a point to be friendly with the Building Inspector. He's there to help and can be a fountain of information, when building your wood shed.
Does this all sound very promising and great, but you still have your doubts about not being certain how to build a shed and if you are brave enough to buy the shed blueprints? We can help here as well with our newest book How to build a tiny house. This step by step guide with illustration and photographs provides useful information and in-depth instructions regarding every area of timber frame construction and its foundations, walls, roof and floor. You can order it anytime on our website, in a print version or as ebook.
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Before we can finish the base we need to get the electrical ready.  Put a peice of conduit over your electrical wire to protect it from any damage it could receive while you are finishing the base and to give the shed a more finished look.  Make sure the pipe and wire inside are pointing up perpendicular to the ground and are preferably going straight to the location where your first outlet will be.
The design of the shed you choose will depend on what you will be using it for and were it will be located. If you just need a small shed to place garden equipment, a lean to shed can be ideal. This design of shed will not take much room and it can be placed next to a fence or wall. The lean to shed has a single sloped roof design. It is one of the most common for garden tools as well as pool equipment and chemicals.
Before we can finish the base we need to get the electrical ready.  Put a peice of conduit over your electrical wire to protect it from any damage it could receive while you are finishing the base and to give the shed a more finished look.  Make sure the pipe and wire inside are pointing up perpendicular to the ground and are preferably going straight to the location where your first outlet will be.
A lean to shed is the perfect way to build up against a fence or wall and still have plenty of room in your yard. It also keeps water away from the structure you are building up against. The lean to shed design is the simplest design of shed to build because of its single plane sloping roof which makes the roof easy to build. We have many different configurations and sizes either with double or single doors. The larger lean to designs include optional plans to build the doors on any side of the shed. Our smaller lean to style sheds have a 4 in 12 pitch roof and our larger designs have a 2 in 12 pitch roof to keep the overall shed height lower and help reduce shed construction costs.

Build the framework for all four walls. To account for the fact that the front and back walls are different from each other (due to the doorframe in the front) and the side walls must both be sloped (to prevent rain from collecting on the roof), each of these will have to be tackled somewhat differently. It’s easiest to construct the back first, the front second, and the two sides last, as shown in the numbered image below. See How to Frame a Wall for more information before you read the instructions below.[5]

how to build a shed

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