Don Vandervort has developed his expertise for more than 30 years, as Building Editor for Sunset Books, Senior Editor at Home Magazine, author of more than 30 home improvement books, and writer of countless magazine articles. He appeared for 3 seasons on HGTV’s “The Fix,” and served as MSN’s home expert for several years. Don founded HomeTips in 1996.

Ordering a prehung wood door like this from the lumberyard could cost as much as $1,000, but you can build one suitable for a shed at a fraction of the cost. We purchased clear pine at a home center and spent $120 for the boards. Photos 8 – 10 show how to build the door and mount it to a trim piece with hinges. The door consists of two layers of 3/4-in.-thick boards that overlap at the corners to add strength. Rip 1×6 boards to 4-1/2 in. on a table saw for the outside layer (Figure F).
Once you’ve received the package and all it entails, you can begin creating your own outdoor shed whenever you feel ready. The only time you need to exert the effort is when you’ve begun construction. When you do decide to start, make sure that you have a decent amount of time as well as motivation to carry through the whole project. You don’t want to be left with an unfinished shed out in the yard, a constant reminder that you tried and failed.

We built the Colonial-style garden shed shown here from a set of mail-order building plans. The 10 x 16-ft. outbuilding has easy-to-install plywood siding, three large windows and two pairs of doors. The entire building could be used for storage, but we decided to divide the interior space into two separate areas: a 4 x 10-ft. tool-storage area and a 10 x 12-ft. children's playroom.
Each truss is made up of two 2 x 4 rafters and one 2 x 4 ceiling joist. The three boards are joined together with 1/2-in. plywood gussets. To speed up the assembly process, build all the trusses on the shed floor before erecting the walls. Start by cutting all the rafters to length with a 40° angle at one end of each. Cut 2 x 4s to 10 ft. long for the bottom chords of the trusses. Also, cut all of the plywood gussets.
The construction of a wood foundation is usually built using pressure-treated 2x6 lumbers. These parts are called the band on the ends and the joist in the middle of the band, spaced out 16-24 inches apart. The foundation frame will sit on top of pressure-treated 4x4 posts called skids. The skids will set on the cinder blocks or on top of gravel to prevent rot.
The toughest and most important part of building a shed is finding the right plans. Sure you can just start building without plans, but do you know how it will look when you are done? Or you can search for free plans, but are they designed right? What I recommend is finding plans, even if it means you have to pay a little. Make sure that sample plans are provided so you know what you are getting. Do not make a purchase just because they show lots of nice sheds but no sample of the actual plans you will be buying. Look for the following before you decide to purchase:
The toughest and most important part of building a shed is finding the right plans. Sure you can just start building without plans, but do you know how it will look when you are done? Or you can search for free plans, but are they designed right? What I recommend is finding plans, even if it means you have to pay a little. Make sure that sample plans are provided so you know what you are getting. Do not make a purchase just because they show lots of nice sheds but no sample of the actual plans you will be buying. Look for the following before you decide to purchase:

Cut the sill piece and assemble the windows with pocket screws. Using a router with a 3/8-in. rabbet bit, rout a 3/8-in.-deep recess on the back of the window to receive the 1/4-in. Plexiglas acrylic sheet (Photo 14). Set the window frame, recessed side down, over a piece of acrylic sheet and trace the shape with a permanent marker. Cut the curve with a fine-tooth jigsaw blade and the straight sections with a fine-tooth blade in a table saw or circular saw.


There are many ways and methods of beginning a foundation for your shed, but so as to keep this manual simple we will begin by looking at the procedures followed while building a shed. The types of the foundation include a concrete slab foundation, a sunken pillar, and wood skid. The e-book is helpful to those who might not be interested in shed building from the scratch. It takes time to explain in detail the materials required and the step by step methods required to give one the moral to build the shed. It also explains the easy steps in a very fun way. Furthermore, the process of building your shed on your own is quite a fun task as one watches the shed start from nothing to something beautiful and useful. Isn’t that exciting? At least one feels useful after performing such type of a task that feels to be quite a huge burden. The following steps are derived from the e-book on steps used to build a foundation:

Before a hammer hits a nail: plan, plan, and plan some more. All too often people visit local home centers to get shed ideas. They go inside the prebuilt sheds in the parking lot and decide their own storage needs right then and there. Even worse, they'll grab a few brochures and use those ideas to find a shed design online without doing any proper space planning.
The Roofs of the sheds usually come in different shapes, sizes, and styles. One impeccable style among then is the Gambrel Roof, highly associated with barns and pole barns. The advantage of adopting this style is that these sheds can be used as high capacity storage spaces because of the steeper sides. Most of the recent homes have Gambler Roof Sheds because of the intricate beauty they bring to the home. Instead of bringing a standard roof, it won’t make much difference to bring a Gambrel Roof, given that you match the materials to your building.​

The design of the shed you choose will depend on what you will be using it for and were it will be located. If you just need a small shed to place garden equipment, a lean to shed can be ideal. This design of shed will not take much room and it can be placed next to a fence or wall. The lean to shed has a single sloped roof design. It is one of the most common for garden tools as well as pool equipment and chemicals.
A lean to shed is the perfect way to build up against a fence or wall and still have plenty of room in your yard. It also keeps water away from the structure you are building up against. The lean to shed design is the simplest design of shed to build because of its single plane sloping roof which makes the roof easy to build. We have many different configurations and sizes either with double or single doors. The larger lean to designs include optional plans to build the doors on any side of the shed. Our smaller lean to style sheds have a 4 in 12 pitch roof and our larger designs have a 2 in 12 pitch roof to keep the overall shed height lower and help reduce shed construction costs.
Now you have finished your shed!  Once your doors are on, you can add latches and locks.  The windows on our shed are made of 1/4 inch thick plexiglass held in with white silicone to match the trim.  The floor was finished with concrete tiles. You can now choose to leave the inside of your shed barren, to say, store a few larger items, or you can add shelves like we did.  We added the shelves because we had a lot of small boxes and things that we wanted to move out of the garage.  They are made from 7/16 inch thick oriented strand board and 2x2s.  The shelves in the middle have some spare 6x6 chunks keeping them up, which is suitable because they are the deepest and are designed to hold the heaviest items.  They are so strong that you can climb on them, even jump on them!  We also added a bike rack on the right hand side that can hold our five bikes.  The finishing touch on the shed was to add an electrical outlet and a flourescent lighting fixture with a switch.  There is a vent in the back wall for warm summer days but it is probably unneccesary.  Hopefully you can build your own storage shed and de-cluterize your life as well.  Thanks!

· Firewood storage sheds — mainly used to store firewood from elements of weather such as rainfall that may destroy them. The most common type of firewood shed is the lean on shed. It is also the most suitable as it allows free circulation of air, therefore, preventing dampness of the firewood. It is also near the house so the firewood is stored near your house and may access anytime you need them.
Ryan had a difficult time building his own first shed. Wrong material, wrong measures, wrong techniques, all of them didn’t help in making the shed any quicker. It took him 6 months to complete his first shed project, and at the end of it he was worn out and exhausted. Even after spending a lot of time reading and purchasing woodworking books, blueprints, nothing seemed to work. Most of the shed plans he bought lacked vital information which left him with more questions than answers. That is when he decided to leave it all aside and build his own shed plans. That was the beginning of his work towards building his master collection of shed plans.
I don't waste my time on free plans, store-bought sheds, or ready-made, mail order kit solutions... been there, done that. Free means lack of user feedback and you get absolutely no customer support. With store-bought and ready-made mail order sheds: they're flimsy, profit-driven solutions that I've always had to tear apart and modify too much to get the storage space to work or to match the character and style of the home.

Build the framework for the back wall. Make the top and bottom beams (a.k.a. the plates) the same length as the length of the floor which they sit. To keep your measurements simple, make the spacing between the vertical studs identical to the spacing between your floor joists. Note that the back wall should be lower than the front wall so that the roof slopes and directs rain away from the door.[6]
Because most DIY manuals and plans are written by ghostwriters who don’t know anything about carpentry, it is common to find incomplete guides. This package is different. Ryan has spent time and effort ensuring that his expertise is laid out in a way that anyone can follow. After all, he is an educator. You also save because the plans make sure you don’t waste material.
Firewood sheds are simple sheds designed to help your firewood dry out and also keep it from getting a lot of water on the wood when it rains or snows. The simple open front design allows the wood to be easily accessible and increases air flow around the stacked wood. The floors are designed using 2x4 boards spaced 1" apart to provide plenty of strength and allow allow air to circulate up through the floor and around the wood to season it properly. The roofs are corrugated metal but they can also be roofed with asphalt shingles.
This shed featured on houzz is inspiring in many different ways. First, check out the design. Isn’t it charming how all the different types of wood and all the different colors complement each other? What a wonderful way to use reclaimed wood pieces…Another detail that has to do with the design is the fact that this shed has clerestory windows. It’s not usually common for shed to have windows of any kind but, when you think about, it’s a pretty practical feature.
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We now need to create a base that we can nail the frames for the walls into.  We did this with four 2x8's and some bent i-bolts along with a lot of mortar.  The basic process was that we bent the bottoms of the i-bolts after heating them with a blow torch, and then anchored these in some of the holes in the cinderblocks with a lot of mortar.  Then we drilled holes in the 2x8's where the i-bolts were and put these on top and screwed them in.  The frames can now be solidly attached to the base with the framing hammer.
I think that we had to purchase some additional hangers that were built especially for bike tires. This system worked pretty well, one comment that I have is that they don't hold up to the weight of several combined bikes as well as I would like. You need to make sure that the track is anchored very often, as having hooks in between anchor points starts to flex the main rail and can result in the hooks popping off.
Shed are also great if you have a hobby. For example, if you’re passionate about pottery, gardening or even painting, you could use the garden shed as your private workspace. You can give it windows if you think you’ll need natural light inside. In fact, this can be an opportunity to upcycle some old windows and doors. Check out this project that we found on countryliving to see how this chic shed was built.
A shed could double as a greenhouse, in which case you can use the shed plans provided on instructables. In this particular case, the shed was built out of old windows. An old window isn’t exactly something you can repurpose easily but here it’s a perfect fit. The first step is to gather enough windows. After that, it’s time to build the frame and you’ll need some wood for this part. Make sure the foundation is secure before you screw in the windows.
A shed isn’t something you see people build…at least not very often. It’s rather the type of structure you discover in the backyard when you purchase an old house. So how do these things appear? They’re obviously built so let’s see what it takes so put a shed together. We looked around and we found a bunch of shed plans that we’d like to share with you. They’re pretty simple and you don’t need much experience with this sort of projects to be able to pull it off. They’re all customizable so you can enjoy them whether you want a pretty she shed or a manly workshop.

With the wall in position, secure it by screwing down through the bottom 2 x 4 plate and into the floor framing. Frame and erect the rear wall, followed by the front wall. Then, install the interior partition. If you're including a playroom, as we did, cover the partition side that faces that room with plywood, and screw it in place. Then install the final wall.


Because the shed is designed to abut to another structure, the foundation need only be pressure-treated skids, the roof pitched in only one direction to shed water, and the back wall sheathed with 1/2-inch CDX plywood, which withstands indirect exposure to moisture. See Anatomy of an Outdoor Shed or Playhouse for more about typical shed construction.
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