Shed are also great if you have a hobby. For example, if you’re passionate about pottery, gardening or even painting, you could use the garden shed as your private workspace. You can give it windows if you think you’ll need natural light inside. In fact, this can be an opportunity to upcycle some old windows and doors. Check out this project that we found on countryliving to see how this chic shed was built.
We’re not going to tell you that all pre-made sheds are bad. On the contrary, if you spend enough money, you can buy a pre-made or so-called ‘flat-pack’ shed and it’ll last you a very long time. However, buying a pre-built shed will cost you double, triple or even quadruple what it would cost you to build your own. DIY sheds are cheaper to build than pre-made sheds, and because you are building them yourself from scratch, you can be sure of the quality. This is a key point, because with a pre-made or flat-pack shed, you can never be sure that the lumber being used is of good quality, or even if it came from sustainable sources (if that’s important to you).You can also put your mark on a shed you build yourself. Feel free to mark the lumbar you use to show off your workmanship, and feel free to modify the design of the shed however you like. You won’t be constrained by building your own shed either, meaning you can add shelves and intricate design features as you go along. Until now, the only option you had was to hire a professional to build your shed since you never had the knowledge to do so. But, today is your lucky day! Welcome to 3DSHEDPLANS™, where we offer gable, lean-to and hip shed plans that come with a complete list of tools, accessories, hardware and material you would require to do the job yourself. And, it’s not that difficult at all! Our plans come with detail instructions, 3D dimensions, list of materials and even highlighted points where you need to nail to attach the lumber. What else would you require to start working on your shed right away?

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This shed, one of our most popular outdoor storage sheds ever, features some unique details that make it look more expensive than it really was to build. Arch-top windows and a custom door give this shed a high-quality look that belies its low cost and simple construction. The panelized construction technique means you could build the parts in your garage on a rainy weekend and then haul them to the site for assembly. Modest finishes like OSB siding and composite trim and fiberglass shingles help keep the materials cost low. And you’ll save hundreds of dollars by providing your own labor to build the door and windows for some cheap outdoor storage. The modular construction and wood platform foundation mean you can construct this shed almost anywhere, even on remote or sloping sites. In this article, we’ll show you the basics of how to build the shed and install the windows and doors.
Stand the back wall. Then align the corner of the side and back walls and nail them together. With a helper on the outside of the shed to push if necessary, line up the inside edge of the bottom plate with the chalk line and nail it to the platform. Continue around the building, standing the opposite end wall and finally the front wall. Nail the corners together, making sure that the top plates of adjoining walls are flush with each other.
If your shed site slopes, pouring concrete is a bigger job because you have to build strong forms and pour extra concrete on the downhill side. A simpler method is to build your shed floor like a deck, with footings, posts and a wood frame covered by plywood. If you don’t like the opening under the shed, build a skirt to cover the space between the shed floor and the ground.
The plan features not only a cutting list and project diagram. There are also clear instructions starting from building the base and ending with installing the windows and doing the trims. Once you’ve built a small shed like this, you’ll have enough experience to build a bigger one that fits all the garden equipment as well. A tiny shed like this though is a necessary item for every home!
Don’t be tempted to get sloppy when you square up the floor and walls of your shed. An out-of-square start will haunt you through the rest of the project, from doors and windows to trim and roofing. For a concrete slab, measure diagonally across the opposite corners of the form boards. Then adjust the forms until the diagonal measurements are equal. Do the same for a wood platform floor. If you’re installing sheet siding on the walls, before you stand them up, measure diagonally and square up the wall before you nail on the siding.
For a freestanding shed, you can build the shed on top of a concrete slab (see Pouring a Concrete Slab) instead of the pressure-treated skids and floor joists; this will actually result in a sturdier—more permanent— structure. Otherwise, for a freestanding shed, the foundation should be constructed on concrete piers or poured footings (see Pouring Concrete Footings & Piers).  Be aware that building on footings will raise the height of the shed up from the ground.
After the concrete is all ready, the sole plates are then joined together with the anchor plates which protrude out of the foundation. Use the carpenter’s pencil and measuring tape to mark about one and a half inches from the board end continually every sixteen inches till the further end. These marks guide where the studs will be placed. Mark where the anchor and the mudsill meet up with a different marker from the one used initially. The studs are then taken and galvanized nails are driven through the marked areas into the center of the board until they reach the stud bottom. The studs should be secured to the baseboard.
• Wastage of space — this is one of the greatest mistakes one can make. It is mostly caused by poor construction planning. You may such a mistake also by taking measurements poorly. You should consider all the activities and purposes that you will use your shed for before starting the construction. In that manner, you will be able to come up with a shed design that will suit its purpose and your wishes. One may also consider building a double floor shed to save on your compound space. You wouldn’t want to deny your kids their playing ground! You may also want to construct a different structure in the future then you get hindered due to the little space left or unless you would have to dig deeper into your pockets to modify your shed.
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