Build the framework for all four walls. To account for the fact that the front and back walls are different from each other (due to the doorframe in the front) and the side walls must both be sloped (to prevent rain from collecting on the roof), each of these will have to be tackled somewhat differently. It’s easiest to construct the back first, the front second, and the two sides last, as shown in the numbered image below. See How to Frame a Wall for more information before you read the instructions below.[5]


Can I tell you a secret? I don’t think I would ever do this again because I have another secret. Shhh, don’t tell, but DIY projects that are a joint effort between my hubby and myself really aren’t fun. They are stressful, and hard and take a toll on us. Which may seem strange in a way because we are both handy and we both enjoy these type of projects and we even have a pretty good idea as to what we are doing. Actually, I think we really have it together – separately! Once you throw the two of us together is gets a little intense. Enough about that, let’s get on to the project.
Working from ladders is more dangerous than working from scaffolding. Plus, having to constantly move ladders around is time consuming. When you get to the roof construction, consider renting a set of scaffolding with wheels. You’ll be amazed at how much easier it is to have a stable platform to work from and to set your tools and materials on. You can rent a 5-ft.-tall section of scaffold with three planks and wheels for about $110 per week.

DIY Shed Plans

×