Now you have finished your shed!  Once your doors are on, you can add latches and locks.  The windows on our shed are made of 1/4 inch thick plexiglass held in with white silicone to match the trim.  The floor was finished with concrete tiles. You can now choose to leave the inside of your shed barren, to say, store a few larger items, or you can add shelves like we did.  We added the shelves because we had a lot of small boxes and things that we wanted to move out of the garage.  They are made from 7/16 inch thick oriented strand board and 2x2s.  The shelves in the middle have some spare 6x6 chunks keeping them up, which is suitable because they are the deepest and are designed to hold the heaviest items.  They are so strong that you can climb on them, even jump on them!  We also added a bike rack on the right hand side that can hold our five bikes.  The finishing touch on the shed was to add an electrical outlet and a flourescent lighting fixture with a switch.  There is a vent in the back wall for warm summer days but it is probably unneccesary.  Hopefully you can build your own storage shed and de-cluterize your life as well.  Thanks!
We make great shed plans.  It’s all we do and we love it! All of our shed plans are available to download instantly at checkout. There isn’t an easier shed plan checkout process on the web!  When you buy a plan from us, you are guaranteed a great plan at a great value.Every one of our 200+ plans are easy to build thanks to our thorough and easy to follow instructions. All of our shed plans come with more information compared to the competition. Things like a tool list, a cut list, and a material list in excel format are all included.
Nail plywood sheeting to the joists to form the floor. If necessary, use H-clips in addition to nailing the sheets into place; these fit between two pieces of plywood and lock them together for additional structural strength. In the example design, two standard sheets of 4- by 8-foot plywood are used whole and a third is sawn in half and used to fill in the 4-foot difference on either end. Because of the spacing of the piers, support beams, and joists, no additional cuts or adjustments are necessary. Note that the pieces of plywood are intentionally misaligned so that the floor doesn’t have a single seam running across the whole thing, which would be a significant structural weakness.
Also square the frame by making sure diagonal measurements from opposite corners are equal. Then tack one corner to hold it square. Finally, nail the soffit to the roof frame with 6d galvanized box nails. We used 12-in.-wide fiber cement siding for soffit material. Mount an inexpensive carbide blade on your circular saw to cut the fiber cement. Set the roof panel aside and build the other half of the roof using the same techniques.
When buying the lumber, you should select the planks with great care, making sure they are straight and without any visible flaws (cracks, knots, twists, decay). Investing in cedar or other weather resistant lumber is a good idea, as it will pay off on the long run. Use a spirit level to plumb and align the components, before inserting the galvanized screws, otherwise the project won’t have a symmetrical look. If you have all the materials and tools required for the project, you could get the job done in about a day.

· Gambrel styled shed — it is a very common type of shed. Its roof is highly steep and is four sided. This type of shed at some point resembles a hexagon. This type of shed is preferred as the shape of its roof makes the interior of the shed to be spacious hence creating more space where a lot of garden and outdoor tools can be stored. In this type of shed, one may have a workshop in the shed. They can even accommodate a car due to their large spaces.


I don't waste my time on free plans, store-bought sheds, or ready-made, mail order kit solutions... been there, done that. Free means lack of user feedback and you get absolutely no customer support. With store-bought and ready-made mail order sheds: they're flimsy, profit-driven solutions that I've always had to tear apart and modify too much to get the storage space to work or to match the character and style of the home.
If you don’t plan to have electricity running through your shed, this is the shed building tip you will want to listen to most. Windows easily brighten up a shed so you don’t have to hunt around for a flashlight or a lantern if you’re old school, every time you need to grab something from your shed. But…don’t go nuts and install a ton of windows or you will be giving up valuable space to hang tools or shelves.
The Shed plans are indeed helpful, and the product is entirely promising if you are looking forward to building a single shed in your home. It is entirely different from the other havoc packages that we usually see online and therefore it is not a bad package. The product offers double a number of resources if not the designs exactly, given the content and as long as you are buying it, you will receive many e-books and also additional materials.
As I mentioned above and it won’t hold you anything back, proving worthy of every penny that you have spent. In case if you are making the rightful purchase by spending $37.00, you will indeed receive incredible content for every penny you have spent. You can also have additional discounts given based on the season. After the purchase, you will also receive a Premium Bonus package if you pay an additional amount of $30. The Premium package as the name says contains stuff that is much beyond the regular package. But if you feel that the regular package is enough, you don’t have to purchase it.
To be sure, the whole permitting process can be a bit intimidating. And, if I'm being honest here, I've never been comfortable dealing with the city and all their codes - seems they're always moving the line on me. But, I always make it a point to be friendly with the Building Inspector. He's there to help and can be a fountain of information, when building your wood shed.
Thanks for sharing such detailed plans Seamster. I'm hoping to build a very small lean-to tool shed (2.5X4.5' base) for my very small yard and this has given me a lot of insight. Currently, theor the table and mitre saws I inherited are stored in our spare bedroom... eventual nursery room. I want to get them into their own space outdoors sooner than later. Here in North Carolina with the humid summers I think it would be best to add some housewrap to the walls to help protect the tools. I also have a situation where the back wall will only be 4-6" off the house so need to construct/panel my walls before erecting them. Do you know if it's reasonable to panel then wrap each wall frame, side it and then finally erect and fasten? Would be very grateful for your thoughts!

High-quality materials may cost a bit more, but they’ll save you time, trouble, and money in the long run. The chart here shows how LP® SmartSide® Panels compare with untreated plywood, vinyl, and galvanized metal. No wonder so many pros recommend sheds made with beautiful, durable LP products! If you want your shed to resist splitting, cracking, decay, and termite damage while duplicating the good looks of rich, real cedar, choose LP SmartSide® products.
Don’t assume that you’re missing something if you have a question that cannot be answered within the guidelines of the shed plans. Builders at all levels will always have questions and it is better to ask the question than miss something important in the process. Go online and find a forum or a video if you have a question. Better yet, read all the little print that you skipped over in your shed plan and see if the answer is there, it might be.
• Wastage of space — this is one of the greatest mistakes one can make. It is mostly caused by poor construction planning. You may such a mistake also by taking measurements poorly. You should consider all the activities and purposes that you will use your shed for before starting the construction. In that manner, you will be able to come up with a shed design that will suit its purpose and your wishes. One may also consider building a double floor shed to save on your compound space. You wouldn’t want to deny your kids their playing ground! You may also want to construct a different structure in the future then you get hindered due to the little space left or unless you would have to dig deeper into your pockets to modify your shed.
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