It's a work in progress and likely a labor of love for Rob, aka Weekend Shed Head, who chronicles the construction of his backyard man cave in Nottingham, England, on his Instagram account and YouTube channel. An experienced and enthusiastic do-it-yourselfer, he sort of makes things up as he goes along and seems to know what he's doing. Along the way, Rob posts photos of train stations, the curry dinners and full English breakfasts he cooks, and charming flowers and decor in the garden.

Very nice project. Seems to be well built. When I built mine we went with a full basement and made it tall enough for a 4 ft. attic as well. We maximized our footprint in storage capacity. Electricity in the shed was also a must with its own breaker panel. We needed the space because I even have stuff to fix stuff and there is no such thing as a bad piece of junk.
The plans are pirated copies, some from "mycabinandsheds.com" as well as scanned 100 year old books . They are basic plans of very limited value. I clicked on a link from a "Kim Komando" email and saw the add for 12000 plans and I figured it was a trusted advertiser. Come to find out after contacting Komando that there are 3rd party advertisers she would take no credit for endorsing. I should have done more research before I paid for anything but after finding out it is a scam I called the 1-800-390-6035 click bank number and they gave me a refund with no arguing at all.

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The last thing you want is to build a shed only to discover that it’s too small to hold your stuff, handle your hobby, or otherwise meet your needs. By the same token, you don’t want a shed that’s so large it overwhelms your property and looks ungainly behind your house. Choosing the wrong size shed is a common homeowner error, but LP Outdoor Building Solutions’ handy tool helps you get it just right. Check it out, and you’ll see that size does matter!
I'm always surprised at how little forethought most backyard builders give to the shed's doors. After all, there's no sense in building a shed to store a particular item, such as a lawn tractor or wheelbarrow, if you can't fit it through the door. I saw a shed recently that had its doors removed. When I asked why, the homeowner explained that he framed the doorway wide enough for his riding lawnmower, but didn't take into account the amount of space taken up by the hinged inset doors. So, he had to remove the doors to fit the mower inside. (He's in the market for a skinnier mower.)
Most homeowners barely have enough time to keep their homes in shape, never mind their sheds. Heck, I was supposed to paint our downstairs bathroom before the kids got out of school last month. I just picked up the paint yesterday. That's why it's smart to choose low-maintenance materials for your shed. You usually need to pay a bit extra for these, but they'll save you time and trouble in the long run.
· Wood sheds — these types of sheds are made of wood. They are the most common type of shed compared to metal and plastics. They are the most conducive as they can be used as children playhouses, outdoor office and still storage of garden tools. They are also easy to modify and renovate as increasing their size. They are preferred to other types as they blend well with the environment and give the environment a good natural look. However, they must be maintained regularly from insects as termites which feed on wood.
A garden shed can be strictly functional, but it can also be a decorative focal point around which you design your garden or yard. These plans will help you build a basic shed, but don’t stop there! To customize your shed, you could create a combination toolshed and greenhouse, put a martin house on top, or use part of the shed for a chicken coop or rabbit hutch. If you’re feeling even more adventurous, you could create a living roof of moss or succulent plants.
A garden shed can be strictly functional, but it can also be a decorative focal point around which you design your garden or yard. These plans will help you build a basic shed, but don’t stop there! To customize your shed, you could create a combination toolshed and greenhouse, put a martin house on top, or use part of the shed for a chicken coop or rabbit hutch. If you’re feeling even more adventurous, you could create a living roof of moss or succulent plants.
There are many ways and methods of beginning a foundation for your shed, but so as to keep this manual simple we will begin by looking at the procedures followed while building a shed. The types of the foundation include a concrete slab foundation, a sunken pillar, and wood skid. The e-book is helpful to those who might not be interested in shed building from the scratch. It takes time to explain in detail the materials required and the step by step methods required to give one the moral to build the shed. It also explains the easy steps in a very fun way. Furthermore, the process of building your shed on your own is quite a fun task as one watches the shed start from nothing to something beautiful and useful. Isn’t that exciting? At least one feels useful after performing such type of a task that feels to be quite a huge burden. The following steps are derived from the e-book on steps used to build a foundation:
I don't waste my time on free plans, store-bought sheds, or ready-made, mail order kit solutions... been there, done that. Free means lack of user feedback and you get absolutely no customer support. With store-bought and ready-made mail order sheds: they're flimsy, profit-driven solutions that I've always had to tear apart and modify too much to get the storage space to work or to match the character and style of the home.
Make a template on the shed floor for assembling the trusses. Begin by laying out the parts for one truss. Align the bottom chord with the edge of the plywood floor. Then cut four 24-in.-long 2 x 4s. Lay two alongside each rafter and screw them to the plywood floor. Now use these short boards as stopblocks for laying out and assembling each truss. Fasten plywood gussets to each side of every truss with carpenter's glue and 1-in. roofing nails and set the trusses aside.
After laying out the 12 blocks, use a straight 2 x 4 and a 4-ft. level to ensure that all the blocks are level. Shim up any low blocks with strips of asphalt roofing, cedar shingles or 2-in.-thick concrete patio block. Next, form each front and rear band joist by nailing a 2 x 6 to a 2 x 8 mudsill. Set the mudsills on top of the blocks running across the front and rear of the shed. Cut a third 2 x 8 mudsill to fit along the tops of the center row of foundation blocks.
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It is worth mentioning that the files in this program can be easily downloaded into PDF format. This provides you with each access at your construction site. The best part is that you can easily browse through different shed plans on your server, and pick the ones that meet your specific project needs and requirements. You can even download everything on your server. The process is very easy to access and understand.
Are you one of those people who love woodworking and seek joy out of it? If yes, well you might already know that every woodworking project requires a certain amount of time and effort to be invested in it. In some cases, it’s almost the same as the construction projects, and many people say that building a wooden shed is synonymous to building a brick wall. Even when it’s easy and simple, you should have adequate knowledge to successfully implement the design plan.
Door placement is also important. You often see doors placed on the gable end of the building, which looks nice, but makes it virtually impossible to reach items stored at the rear of the shed. A better alternative is to put the door on the long side wall, so that you'll be able to access items to the right, left and back. Another option is to install doors on both gable-end walls, so that you'll be able to easily reach items from either end of the shed.
One last thing about shed sizes, it’s a good idea to always measure out the dimensions in your own garden before you invest any money. You can do this easily by using a couple of stakes and a string to measure out the space. That’s how the pros do it. Make sure that you leave enough room on all sides of the shed to help with rain drainage and prevent water damage. 

The best spot for a shed is level, well-drained ground close to where you work in your garden or yard. The location doesn’t need to be perfectly flat; the foundation design shown in the plans allows for adjustments to make the floor level. Small sheds require only a top-of-soil foundation, even in locations with freezing winter temperatures. Precast concrete deck blocks work perfectly for this.
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