When people talk about the different types of shed available, what they should describe are the different types of roof available, since sheds only really differ by the type of roof they have. We provide shed plans for three types of roof: Gable, Lean-To and Hip. Gable, Lean-To and Hip roofs each have their pros and cons. Gable roofs are the most common since they are simple to build and offer plenty of space. Lean-To sheds are popular too for confined spaces. Hip roof sheds are the most complex to build, but they are arguably the most desirable too since they have a more uniform appearance. In terms of shed size, you should choose one that fills the space you have in your yard but you should also consider the overhang for the roof. A 16X24 shed is big enough for vehicle storage and to be used as a workshop, while a 12X16 shed is perfect for storing all your yard tools and mechanical equipment. Sheds smaller than this are fine for basic storage. Gable, Lean-To and Hip roofs each have their pros and cons. Gable roofs are the most common since they are simple to build and offer plenty of space. Lean-to sheds are popular too for confined spaces. Hip roof sheds are the most complex to build, but they are arguably the most desirable too since they have a more uniform appearance. In terms of shed size, you should choose one that fills the space you have in your yard but you should also consider the overhang for the roof. A 16X24 shed is big enough for vehicle storage and to be used as a workshop, while a 12X16 shed is perfect for storing all your yard tools and mechanical equipment. Sheds smaller than this are fine for basic storage. Gable, Lean-To and Hip roofs each have their pros and cons. Gable roofs are the most common since they are simple to build and offer plenty of space. Lean-To sheds are popular too for confined spaces. Hip roof sheds are the most complex to build, but they are arguably the most desirable too since they have a more uniform appearance. In terms of shed size, you should choose one that fills the space you have in your yard but you should also consider the overhang for the roof. A 16X24 shed is big enough for vehicle storage and to be used as a workshop, while a 12X16 shed is perfect for storing all your yard tools and mechanical equipment. Sheds smaller than this are fine for basic storage.


You can build the walls on any flat surface, but the shed platform is ideal. Snap chalk lines on the plywood deck, 3-1/2 in. from the edges of the platform, to indicate the inside edge of the walls. Measure to make sure the lines are parallel and 89 in. apart. Then chalk a line down the center (Photo 1). You’ll use this line to make sure the angled top plates meet in the center. 

· Saltbox sheds — they are a very attractive type of sheds which one would not mind having it anywhere in the compound. Due to its shape, it can be used to store larger amounts of items and can be used in different ways depending on their size as they come in different sizes. They are also used as children playhouses. As in the gable shed, this type of shed has two faces of roofs which meet at the center to form a peak. The only difference between the two sheds is that the saltbox sheds one of the roof sides is significantly shorter than the other.
Well I give this jerk credit for his pervasive techniques of getting people back to his website. If you see a review that says Ryans Shed Scam and click it it takes you to his website and it is not a website where you can read about his scam. THis is the biggest rip off I have ever fallen for. Everything is not as advertised. You get 2 plans bnot 12,000. You get lots of articles not books written in 1864, or 1903 and you like reading about obsolete, useless article then this is the plan for you. I am totally disgusted!!!!
Each truss is made up of two 2 x 4 rafters and one 2 x 4 ceiling joist. The three boards are joined together with 1/2-in. plywood gussets. To speed up the assembly process, build all the trusses on the shed floor before erecting the walls. Start by cutting all the rafters to length with a 40° angle at one end of each. Cut 2 x 4s to 10 ft. long for the bottom chords of the trusses. Also, cut all of the plywood gussets.
My Shed Plans by Ryan Henderson is not just your run-of-the-mill collection of a few hundred shed plans, but it is a collection of whopping 12,000 shed plans. Yes! You heard it right. And each one of them is accompanied with detailed, step by step instructions and diagrams, tool and material list ensuring that nothing goes wrong when you start with one.
A garden shed can be strictly functional, but it can also be a decorative focal point around which you design your garden or yard. These plans will help you build a basic shed, but don’t stop there! To customize your shed, you could create a combination toolshed and greenhouse, put a martin house on top, or use part of the shed for a chicken coop or rabbit hutch. If you’re feeling even more adventurous, you could create a living roof of moss or succulent plants.
The slanted roof of a modern house in the San Francisco Bay Area is echoed in this small wooden tool shed. Conceived by Astrid Gaiser Garden Design, the shed becomes an interesting part of the landscape design instead of something tucked or hidden in a corner or side yard. Gaiser even added a chalkboard for kids and adults to draw and write messages.

Once you’ve figured out what you need the shed for, it’s easy to go forward with planning. Keep in mind that sheds, no matter how small in their size, are not exactly the best projects for beginner woodworkers. Sheds are one of the most complex woodworking items to build. Some bigger sheds resemble houses so it’s not a surprise a shed is a project for a skillful hand.
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