My advice... Don't do-it-all-yourself. Novice and pro alike can benefit from each other in DIY. You might have the shed location leveled by a landscaper; get a referral to outsource the shed's foundation to a building subcontractor; you can even have the roof's trusses made by a local truss company and the shingles installed by a handyman or roofer.
Building something yourself, especially something as big as a shed, is always rewarding, but not only will it feel good to have a self-made beauty in your backyard, it’s times lower in cost than buying a shed. In fact, building a small shed can cost as little as $100! That’s a pennysaver! And well, all proper DIY wood projects should be, ain’t that right? 

If you're excited to start browsing Ryan's shed designs, you're right where I was shortly after finding Ryan Shed Plans. If you can dedicate some time to putting your own shed together and don't mind purchasing the materials from a local store or ordering them online as needed, you will appreciate the thorough instructions provided with each of Ryan's plans. There are so many options that you should have no problem finding a design that fits your needs, and you will have tons of inspiration to fuel future projects as well.

If you buy heavy galvanized hardware designed for farm buildings for your shed, it’s overkill. Buy heavy-duty closet door hardware instead. It’s not really meant for outdoor use, but when it’s protected by an overhang, it holds up well. And if the roller bearings get corroded, it’s simple to replace the entire hanger mechanism. Check out Johnson Hardware’s 111 track and 1025 ball-bearing hangers.

The front wall has a 6-foot-long top plate and two 1-foot-long bottom plates, leaving space for a 4-foot-wide door. The four wall studs are 81 1/4 inches long; install them as shown in the front framing detail at left. Next, install the 73-inch-long jack studs, and then attach the 51-inch-long doubled header. Finally, attach the 6 1/4-inch-long cripple studs.

I'm always surprised at how little forethought most backyard builders give to the shed's doors. After all, there's no sense in building a shed to store a particular item, such as a lawn tractor or wheelbarrow, if you can't fit it through the door. I saw a shed recently that had its doors removed. When I asked why, the homeowner explained that he framed the doorway wide enough for his riding lawnmower, but didn't take into account the amount of space taken up by the hinged inset doors. So, he had to remove the doors to fit the mower inside. (He's in the market for a skinnier mower.)


A tool shed is pretty easy to build. We found this inspiring example on thecavenderdiary which, as you can see, has a pretty straight-forward, traditional look. It has its back on the wall and inside there’s not much worth mentioning, except maybe for those practical storage hooks, shelves and rods on the inside of the doors. Check out the plans for this toolshed and find a way to customize them according to your own storage needs.
The program consists of a wide range of downloadable files, which contain many different step by step instructions and plans related to woodworking. These tutorials are focused on a wide range of projects, such as potting shed plans, wood shed plans, storage shed plans, garage storage plans, house plans and more. All the shed plans discussed in this program are divided on the basis of each project type.

best shed plans

×