Lastly, as I conclude this guide, I would recommend you to sign up for the ultimate e-book on shed building plans. It has been very useful book for me. Initially, I found shed building quite a hard task that one could only hire people to do it for you, but ever since I read it has changed my perspective on things concerning shed building. The e-book makes shed building look as easy as it can get. The e-book gives quite clear guides that are easy to understand. It gives the various shed building plans which are well elaborated and precise. I have also learned the difference and the best ways you may use to build great sheds that meet your needs. If you would like to gain a vast knowledge of shed building, do not miss this golden opportunity by signing up for the e-book!
A saltbox shed is defined by its double sloping roof style. The front roof has a steep slope of 12/12, and the rear roof has a lower slope of 5/12. Most plans have options for the doors on either the front or side. Click on the images to view more details. The saltbox style evolved from the practice of extending the second floor roof line down to the first floor level to create additional covered living space. The design adds a south eastern flair to back yard shed designs.

Sheds have become multipurpose, must-have buildings that are competing with pergolas and gazebos as your next backyard project. Pictures on social media only grab people's desires more. Before going any further, do your research. Figure out what you need it for and why, and whether you will build the shed yourself, or hire a pro. Check with your local planning department to comply with codes and guidelines. Determine if the shed will mirror the architectural features of your home--always a good idea. Assess your budget, materials needed, and the time it will take to complete the project.


I felt that this is a very poorly setup web site. I purchased the Ryan’s shed plans online, did not receive an emailed receipt or link to the web site that worked. Phoned Clikbank and they promised to send another receipt. They did not. I had saved the original online confirmation with the links to the site. When I clicked on these it said the files couldn’t be found.
I don't waste my time on free plans, store-bought sheds, or ready-made, mail order kit solutions... been there, done that. Free means lack of user feedback and you get absolutely no customer support. With store-bought and ready-made mail order sheds: they're flimsy, profit-driven solutions that I've always had to tear apart and modify too much to get the storage space to work or to match the character and style of the home.
The roof panels are heavy and a bit awkward, so round up three strong helpers for this part of the job. Move the panels into position and lean them against the front and back walls. Then set up ladders inside the building for two helpers and push one of the panels up to them. Slide the panel up the roof until the bird’s-mouths drop over the top plate of the wall.
One last thing about shed sizes, it’s a good idea to always measure out the dimensions in your own garden before you invest any money. You can do this easily by using a couple of stakes and a string to measure out the space. That’s how the pros do it. Make sure that you leave enough room on all sides of the shed to help with rain drainage and prevent water damage.
Water is wood's worst enemy. Given the right circumstance and enough time, excessive moisture can rot framing, warp floors and doors, corrode hinges and breed mold and mildew. Fortunately, there's an easy remedy. First, be sure that the lowest wood member--the mudsill--is at least 6 in. above the ground. That's sufficient space to allow fresh air to circulate under the shed.
To be sure, the whole permitting process can be a bit intimidating. And, if I'm being honest here, I've never been comfortable dealing with the city and all their codes - seems they're always moving the line on me. But, I always make it a point to be friendly with the Building Inspector. He's there to help and can be a fountain of information, when building your wood shed.
Most homeowners barely have enough time to keep their homes in shape, never mind their sheds. Heck, I was supposed to paint our downstairs bathroom before the kids got out of school last month. I just picked up the paint yesterday. That's why it's smart to choose low-maintenance materials for your shed. You usually need to pay a bit extra for these, but they'll save you time and trouble in the long run.
As you can see, I have no pictures of the doors being created.  This is because they took way too much trouble to make, and I didn't really have the patience to take pictures of them being built because they were tested and redone about 3 times.  Lesson to be learned:  leave the tolerances bigger than you think they will need to be, you can always use weather strips to help close them up later.  After 3 attempts, we finnally got the doors to work properly.  The one door is held in place with sliding dead-bolts to the floor and ceiling frames and the second door is attached to it with another dead-bolt.
Build the framework for all four walls. To account for the fact that the front and back walls are different from each other (due to the doorframe in the front) and the side walls must both be sloped (to prevent rain from collecting on the roof), each of these will have to be tackled somewhat differently. It’s easiest to construct the back first, the front second, and the two sides last, as shown in the numbered image below. See How to Frame a Wall for more information before you read the instructions below.[5]
A few decorative touches can help your shed fit in with the architecture of your home and even convey how you use it. Some folks like to dress things up with a front porch, dormer, or gable, but simply adding barn-style doors, shuttered windows, and a bit of gingerbread trim can make all the difference. Color, of course, goes a long way too. Check out all the options at the LP Shed Gallery, where you’ll also see details on the materials used. Inspired by the seemingly endless possibilities, you’ll emerge motivated to create a shed you’ll be proud to show off!
You get well over 12,000 Shed Plans and Woodworking Designs plus 4 bonuses you get absolutely FREE! These amazing bonuses are worth over $127. These plans are beautifully illustrated with color 3D photos. These step-by-step plans are easy to follow and are second to none. You will not find a more complete collection of shed plans anywhere online. Guaranteed!
Before we can finish the base we need to get the electrical ready.  Put a peice of conduit over your electrical wire to protect it from any damage it could receive while you are finishing the base and to give the shed a more finished look.  Make sure the pipe and wire inside are pointing up perpendicular to the ground and are preferably going straight to the location where your first outlet will be.
There are a lot of plans and designs to choose from when building the shed, so make sure you take a look over several alternatives before starting the actual construction. Invest in weather-resistant lumber (pressure-treated lumber), making sure all the components are in a good condition and perfectly straight. Drill pilot holes before inserting the screws, to prevent the wood from splitting.

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I think that we had to purchase some additional hangers that were built especially for bike tires. This system worked pretty well, one comment that I have is that they don't hold up to the weight of several combined bikes as well as I would like. You need to make sure that the track is anchored very often, as having hooks in between anchor points starts to flex the main rail and can result in the hooks popping off.
Very nice project. Seems to be well built. When I built mine we went with a full basement and made it tall enough for a 4 ft. attic as well. We maximized our footprint in storage capacity. Electricity in the shed was also a must with its own breaker panel. We needed the space because I even have stuff to fix stuff and there is no such thing as a bad piece of junk.

Remember that anything you build will either add or detract from your property's appearance and may impact your property value. Metal and vinyl materials may be easier to maintain, but are the least expensive options and tend to look cheap. Natural wood and prefinished wood products will add character and value, but are typically more expensive to buy and maintain.
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