Woodworking is a creative pursuit. That’s why it should be fun and enjoyable. If you feel intimidated about taking up woodworking projects, even when you love working with wood, the problem lay not in you but in the woodworking plans you are following. Among all the woodworking projects, people find making outdoor sheds complex and hard to execute. But, that should not be the case. In fact, if the blueprint and the shed plan is good, is explained in detail with step by step instructions, making outdoor sheds should be a breeze.

Level the ground (if necessary) and install deck piers along a grid to support the shed. The piers will allow you to string support beams beneath the floor of the shed. In the example design, the piers are spaced 6 feet (1.8 m) apart in one direction and 4 feet (1.2 m) apart in the other for a total grid area of 12 x 8 feet. This is convenient because once you lay supports along this grid, it will take exactly three standard 4- by 8-foot plywood sheets to cover it.[1]
The slanted roof of a modern house in the San Francisco Bay Area is echoed in this small wooden tool shed. Conceived by Astrid Gaiser Garden Design, the shed becomes an interesting part of the landscape design instead of something tucked or hidden in a corner or side yard. Gaiser even added a chalkboard for kids and adults to draw and write messages.
My Shed Plans by Ryan Henderson is not just your run-of-the-mill collection of a few hundred shed plans, but it is a collection of whopping 12,000 shed plans. Yes! You heard it right. And each one of them is accompanied with detailed, step by step instructions and diagrams, tool and material list ensuring that nothing goes wrong when you start with one.
Build the framework for all four walls. To account for the fact that the front and back walls are different from each other (due to the doorframe in the front) and the side walls must both be sloped (to prevent rain from collecting on the roof), each of these will have to be tackled somewhat differently. It’s easiest to construct the back first, the front second, and the two sides last, as shown in the numbered image below. See How to Frame a Wall for more information before you read the instructions below.[5]

how to build a shed

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