This step by step diy project is about diy 12×16 shed plans. If you are looking for a large storage shed that is both easy to build and that has a really nice appearance, then you should take a look over my plans. This garden project has more parts so take a look over the rest of the sections to learn how to build the roof and the door. Moreover, I have designed shed with many sizes so check them out, as well. Take a look over the rest of my woodworking plans, if you want to get more building inspiration.


You can even go online and look up prices!  For example, if you visit lowes.com, they have a search box where you can enter in the item and find out each price!  This will save you some time.  The only drawback I see to this is that I find it really beneficial to go to these big box lumber stores and see exactly what I want.  For example, the LP Smartside siding panels I recommend to use:  some stores carry a cheap variation of these that have a brown color to them on the inside of the panel, and this is not what you want!  The have the consistency of a 'fibre' panel that will crack easy.  The true LP siding panels are pre-primed on the outside surface and have a natural osb color on the inside surface. 

I tell most of my subscribers to use his program as a resource just like you would a book.   His plans are not all you would ever need in regards to shed plans, but it is a nice start.   For the cost of the program, it is on par with any book you would buy at the store to find shed ideas or plans.  However, you get thousands of plans and 4 bonus offers instead of a few good plans.
How big should a garden shed be so it can be practical without occupying more space than it has to? Well…it depends. I think this cute little garden shed from acultivatednest has one of the smallest possible footprints. The fact that it’s small but tall allows it to be quite practical. It’s great for the storage of garden tools and there’s even some room for a shelf or two or for a few hooks on the walls.
It’s vital to build your shed on a stable, level location—and never in a wet, low-lying area or on a downward slope. And no matter how well a shed is constructed, it won’t hold up on a weak base. A proper foundation is key, one that sets the shed slightly off the ground to aid water drainage and reduce moisture transfer. There are different foundation options, depending on where you live and the size and intended use of the shed, so bone up on the fundamentals and assess your options with this advice from the LP Outdoor Building Solutions team.
The best spot for a shed is level, well-drained ground close to where you work in your garden or yard. The location doesn’t need to be perfectly flat; the foundation design shown in the plans allows for adjustments to make the floor level. Small sheds require only a top-of-soil foundation, even in locations with freezing winter temperatures. Precast concrete deck blocks work perfectly for this.
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