Before we can finish the base we need to get the electrical ready.  Put a peice of conduit over your electrical wire to protect it from any damage it could receive while you are finishing the base and to give the shed a more finished look.  Make sure the pipe and wire inside are pointing up perpendicular to the ground and are preferably going straight to the location where your first outlet will be.
I don't waste my time on free plans, store-bought sheds, or ready-made, mail order kit solutions... been there, done that. Free means lack of user feedback and you get absolutely no customer support. With store-bought and ready-made mail order sheds: they're flimsy, profit-driven solutions that I've always had to tear apart and modify too much to get the storage space to work or to match the character and style of the home.

Did we forget to mention that when you work on the shed yourself, you have the freedom of using the material you want? For instance, if you buy a shed building kit, you will simply be limited to the material that comes with it. But, when you are building the shed yourself, you have all the freedom in the world to pick and choose whatever you like. However, considering you don’t have much experience with building sheds, how would you know what material is better suited? Well, that’s where our free and premium plan come into play. Our plans come with complete lists of materials, hardware and tools that you would require to build the shed alongside their required quantity. We also suggest any alternate material that you can buy if anything is unavailable. You can add the type of doors you want or the windows while we give you the dimensions and how to work around them. Our plans are simple yet powerful and they help while you build your dream shed.

Before you start building your shed, there are a few things you might want to clear out first. For instance, does your town require you to obtain a building permit? Where do you want to build the shed? Is building a shed allowed on your property? Listing down the equipment, furniture, fixtures and goods to be stored in the shed, as this will determine what type of shed you need. What should be the size of the shed? There are practically lots of areas that you need work on before starting with the building phase. The following breakdown will help you get through this phase:

How big should a garden shed be so it can be practical without occupying more space than it has to? Well…it depends. I think this cute little garden shed from acultivatednest has one of the smallest possible footprints. The fact that it’s small but tall allows it to be quite practical. It’s great for the storage of garden tools and there’s even some room for a shelf or two or for a few hooks on the walls.
When you start to look at the plans, you realize some are absurdly out of date, or impossible to read because they are blurred - just like everyone else has reported on this site. What was even more appalling was it appeared most, if not all of what I had purchased, was easily available for free online. Some material looked as though it may have been pilfered - or "borrowed without permission or attribution from educational sites. And much of the "VIP-Premium" content was past its copyright - which is great if you want a children's woodworking book from the 1800's for historical purposes, which I'm sure is a fascinating read, but all that was ultimately meaningless since the sum total of what I downloaded offered nothing of any immediate benefit toward building a shed from a quality, step-by-step plan, with 3-D renderings, Material lists, and best practices, etc to help you build quickly, efficiently, and have something you can use and be proud of. I think the only proprietary plans must the the freebie they give away to entice you to pony up.
Omit the bird’s-mouth from four rafters and use these on the ends. Cut the 2x4s for the ridge and subfascia to length and mark the rafter positions on them. Line up the rafters with the marks and nail through the ridge and subfascia with 16d nails to secure them. When the roof frame is complete, line up the subfascia with the chalk line on the platform and tack it in three or four places with toe screws to hold the frame straight while you install the soffit.

Once you’ve figured out what you need the shed for, it’s easy to go forward with planning. Keep in mind that sheds, no matter how small in their size, are not exactly the best projects for beginner woodworkers. Sheds are one of the most complex woodworking items to build. Some bigger sheds resemble houses so it’s not a surprise a shed is a project for a skillful hand.
Level the ground (if necessary) and install deck piers along a grid to support the shed. The piers will allow you to string support beams beneath the floor of the shed. In the example design, the piers are spaced 6 feet (1.8 m) apart in one direction and 4 feet (1.2 m) apart in the other for a total grid area of 12 x 8 feet. This is convenient because once you lay supports along this grid, it will take exactly three standard 4- by 8-foot plywood sheets to cover it.[1]
A few decorative touches can help your shed fit in with the architecture of your home and even convey how you use it. Some folks like to dress things up with a front porch, dormer, or gable, but simply adding barn-style doors, shuttered windows, and a bit of gingerbread trim can make all the difference. Color, of course, goes a long way too. Check out all the options at the LP Shed Gallery, where you’ll also see details on the materials used. Inspired by the seemingly endless possibilities, you’ll emerge motivated to create a shed you’ll be proud to show off!
Our Free shed plans are aimed more at giving you an idea of what to expect with from the premium plan. For the advanced DIYer, the basic free plans may even be enough to build the full shed. But if you’re a beginner the basic free plan will only act as a guide. In order to get the full step-by-step instructions you would need to invest in one of our premium plans.
It’s not always possible, but if you’re using 4 x 8-ft. sheet siding and have enough helpers around to lift the wall when you’re done, you can save time by siding the walls before you raise them. Make sure to straighten the wall plates and square the wall by measuring diagonally before you nail on the siding. This is easier to do on a wood shed floor because you can tack the plates to the floor to hold the wall straight and square while you install the siding.
The construction of a wood foundation is usually built using pressure-treated 2x6 lumbers. These parts are called the band on the ends and the joist in the middle of the band, spaced out 16-24 inches apart. The foundation frame will sit on top of pressure-treated 4x4 posts called skids. The skids will set on the cinder blocks or on top of gravel to prevent rot.
The sheds available can be distinguished easily as they come in pale green that eventually fades into silvery grey. The Pressure treated sheds are relatively a bit costlier than the DIP treated sheds and the advantage of using them is that they don’t need further preservative treatment and can serve the whole during the entire ten years saving a lot of time and money.​
Before we can finish the base we need to get the electrical ready.  Put a peice of conduit over your electrical wire to protect it from any damage it could receive while you are finishing the base and to give the shed a more finished look.  Make sure the pipe and wire inside are pointing up perpendicular to the ground and are preferably going straight to the location where your first outlet will be.

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