It’s unconventional, but building the roof upside down on the platform has advantages. First, you avoid a lot of ladder work. And second, you can nail the soffit material to the overhangs easily without having to work overhead and in cramped spaces. You do have to take a little extra care to make sure the framing is square and the perimeter 2x4s are perfectly straight before nailing on the soffit, though. Start by cutting out the rafters using the pattern in Figure D as a guide.


Before we can finish the base we need to get the electrical ready.  Put a peice of conduit over your electrical wire to protect it from any damage it could receive while you are finishing the base and to give the shed a more finished look.  Make sure the pipe and wire inside are pointing up perpendicular to the ground and are preferably going straight to the location where your first outlet will be.
The plan features not only a cutting list and project diagram. There are also clear instructions starting from building the base and ending with installing the windows and doing the trims. Once you’ve built a small shed like this, you’ll have enough experience to build a bigger one that fits all the garden equipment as well. A tiny shed like this though is a necessary item for every home!

The best spot for a shed is level, well-drained ground close to where you work in your garden or yard. The location doesn’t need to be perfectly flat; the foundation design shown in the plans allows for adjustments to make the floor level. Small sheds require only a top-of-soil foundation, even in locations with freezing winter temperatures. Precast concrete deck blocks work perfectly for this.
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