When you start to look at the plans, you realize some are absurdly out of date, or impossible to read because they are blurred - just like everyone else has reported on this site. What was even more appalling was it appeared most, if not all of what I had purchased, was easily available for free online. Some material looked as though it may have been pilfered - or "borrowed without permission or attribution from educational sites. And much of the "VIP-Premium" content was past its copyright - which is great if you want a children's woodworking book from the 1800's for historical purposes, which I'm sure is a fascinating read, but all that was ultimately meaningless since the sum total of what I downloaded offered nothing of any immediate benefit toward building a shed from a quality, step-by-step plan, with 3-D renderings, Material lists, and best practices, etc to help you build quickly, efficiently, and have something you can use and be proud of. I think the only proprietary plans must the the freebie they give away to entice you to pony up.
Here we have officially published over 40 FREE garden & storage shed plans, that are suitable for experienced DIY'er. Whether you are looking for a big or small, modern or classy looking shed - we have all of them available for YOU and that too for FREE! In case you want to GO PREMIUM & SAVE BIG: subscribe to our newsletter now and get instant 30% OFF discount code for purchases in our store.
I did my wall studs and roof rafters at 24″ on center, so I used 2 x 6’s for the roof. Also, I made loft storage in the rafters of the front and back 5′ or so and left the middle 6′ or so open for access to the lofts and better lighting. I left the lower cords out in the middle trusses and reinforced them with hurricane ties and extra blocking. To better support the front and back loft floors I doubled up the lower cords on the front and back truss and on the two on either side of the opening and then floored the lofts with 2/4″ plywood. I also put four 14″ x 14″ plastic skylights in tht roof over the center open area to let additional light in.
Building something yourself, especially something as big as a shed, is always rewarding, but not only will it feel good to have a self-made beauty in your backyard, it’s times lower in cost than buying a shed. In fact, building a small shed can cost as little as $100! That’s a pennysaver! And well, all proper DIY wood projects should be, ain’t that right?
A backyard shed frees up your home and garage by storing cumbersome essentials like your riding mower, hedge trimmers, and other lawn care equipment. But these sturdy little buildings can serve a host of other practical functions—and hobbies too. Think chicken coop, greenhouse, screening room—the list is limitless! For a shed to live up to its potential, however, it’s crucial to avoid common building mistakes. The dos and don’ts listed here, courtesy of the LP® Outdoor Building Solutions® pros, will help ensure that your shed meets your needs for years to come, whether you’re simply using it for storage or tricking it out as your outdoor fun zone.
Whether you build your own trusses or order them from the lumberyard, building a roof with trusses is much easier than framing a roof one rafter at a time. As a general rule when learning how to build a shed roof, you’ll need one truss every 2 ft. If you build your own, the cost will be about half this amount. Connect the framing for site-built trusses with plywood gussets glued and screwed to the joints.
The design of the shed you choose will depend on what you will be using it for and were it will be located. If you just need a small shed to place garden equipment, a lean to shed can be ideal. This design of shed will not take much room and it can be placed next to a fence or wall. The lean to shed has a single sloped roof design. It is one of the most common for garden tools as well as pool equipment and chemicals.
The construction of a wood foundation is usually built using pressure-treated 2x6 lumbers. These parts are called the band on the ends and the joist in the middle of the band, spaced out 16-24 inches apart. The foundation frame will sit on top of pressure-treated 4x4 posts called skids. The skids will set on the cinder blocks or on top of gravel to prevent rot.
We found all the materials to build this shed at our local home center. Most of the construction is straightforward and requires only standard carpentry tools and a circular saw. For how to build the shed windows and door, you’ll also need a table saw, power miter saw and router. We used a Kreg pocket hole jig and pocket hole screws to assemble the door and windows. Another really great thing about small storage sheds such as this on, it don’t take as long to build! With a helper or two, you could have the platform and shell built in two or three days. Then expect to spend four or five more days completing the siding, trim, doors, windows and roofing.
If you decide that you don’t want the second package after purchasing the first package, you will be offered a third package which is even more explicit that contains tonnes and tonnes of woodworking plans that are laid over thousands of pages. All these eBooks are neatly organized, very much real and indeed the amount of plans that they contain might even come out as nauseating, if you’re someone who doesn’t have so much of patience to go through all of them.
If you're always in a hurry and terrible with commitments, I might suggest you rent a storage space or continue parking your forty thousand dollar cars in the driveway and save your garage space for unused furniture, bicycles, unpacked boxes, garden rakes, and lawn mowers. Because, the biggest enemy in do-it-yourself is not the lack of carpentry skills or ability to follow directions, but lack of planning and failure to schedule the time it takes to get the job done.
Build the framework for the back wall. Make the top and bottom beams (a.k.a. the plates) the same length as the length of the floor which they sit. To keep your measurements simple, make the spacing between the vertical studs identical to the spacing between your floor joists. Note that the back wall should be lower than the front wall so that the roof slopes and directs rain away from the door.[6]
They are the simplest and cheapest sheds one may find. They are easily assembled by regular people, they do not require initial construction knowledge. One may find the DIY kits and plans for these type of sheds. The most common type of sheds is plastic and wooden. They are mainly used to store garden tools, tractors and store items that are considered unsafe to be stored indoors such as gasoline and agricultural chemicals.
The best spot for a shed is level, well-drained ground close to where you work in your garden or yard. The location doesn’t need to be perfectly flat; the foundation design shown in the plans allows for adjustments to make the floor level. Small sheds require only a top-of-soil foundation, even in locations with freezing winter temperatures. Precast concrete deck blocks work perfectly for this. 
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