For the shed's floor deck, use ¾-in. exterior-grade plywood; anything thinner will flex between joists. (Note that a double layer of ½-in. exterior ply is okay, too.) If you plan to store heavy items, such as a lawn tractor or woodworking machines, consider using ¾-in. tongue-and-groove plywood. This costs slightly more, and is a bit more troublesome to install, but its edges lock tightly together, creating a rock-solid, rigid floor. In areas with excessively high moisture and large numbers of wood-boring bugs--such as Florida, Alabama and the other Gulf Coast states--consider using pressure-treated plywood for the floor deck. It's particularly resistant to moisture and insects.
The roof trusses support the plywood and shingles that make the roof waterproof.  They are very important to plan carefully because they require strange angles and they have to fit the structure below them.  We gave our shed a slight awning and this had to be accompanied by the trusses, which overhang the walls of the shed by about a foot on each side.  When constructing your joists it is important to use joist plates otherwise the angles that you so carefully planned will not remain true for very long.  We used a 2x4 to support the joists while we were attaching them to the walls.

Pasadena, California, is known for its Craftsman style homes, a great number of which have been carefully preserved and restored. Owned by a University of Southern California (USC)-educated architect, Nott & Associates specializes in the Craftsman style. For a backyard shed, Nott custom designed and constructed the wooden doors, which include period-perfect details and hardware.

@diy-plan: Thank-You for your best wishes on the Isacc, believe we always lose sleep when one is on the way. Your advice on not buying factory kit sheds I am 100% in agreement with, they are poor quality lumber, never pressured treated, steldom last more than ten years, here they are lucky to make it six years. I was asked to put one together by a friend after her son bought it for her as a gift, I almost had to rebuild it and when I was finished I thought what an ugly building. Five years later it had termites. When a shed is built on a wood base the base must be anchered into the earth, I have seen sheds flipped upside down after a storm when they are not anchored. I built a shed for a workshop a few years ago to build custom canoes in it, to make it storm ready I used OSB under the siding, then cross braced the studs, insulated it, then covered the studs on the inside with 5/8 inch plywood. The windows have storm shutters that I built for them, if this building fails in a storm I hope I am near the Canadian border.
· Wood sheds — these types of sheds are made of wood. They are the most common type of shed compared to metal and plastics. They are the most conducive as they can be used as children playhouses, outdoor office and still storage of garden tools. They are also easy to modify and renovate as increasing their size. They are preferred to other types as they blend well with the environment and give the environment a good natural look. However, they must be maintained regularly from insects as termites which feed on wood.
Thanks for sharing such detailed plans Seamster. I'm hoping to build a very small lean-to tool shed (2.5X4.5' base) for my very small yard and this has given me a lot of insight. Currently, theor the table and mitre saws I inherited are stored in our spare bedroom... eventual nursery room. I want to get them into their own space outdoors sooner than later. Here in North Carolina with the humid summers I think it would be best to add some housewrap to the walls to help protect the tools. I also have a situation where the back wall will only be 4-6" off the house so need to construct/panel my walls before erecting them. Do you know if it's reasonable to panel then wrap each wall frame, side it and then finally erect and fasten? Would be very grateful for your thoughts!

Woodworking is an art, and like most art forms, it only require dedication, skill and time. Good thing you have our shed plans. You wouldn’t be spending months figuring out how to cut wood pieces, etc. You will get enough guidance to start right away and build a gorgeous shed for your garden. The benefit? You would learn how to build sheds within days. No experiments and no wasting time!
Among our builder plans, we have developed a wide range of shed designs, which we offer in form of DIY plans. If you purchase them, you will receive a detailed shed blueprints and building instructions, from the foundations to the roof, with precise measurements in both metric and imperial systems and full list of materials required for the shed. Our garden sheds, storage sheds and gazebo plans are created in a way to make the construction process comprehensive and easy to build for anyone. Especially easy are the lean-to shed plans, narrow but spacious, very practical and possible to attach to any building or wall.
Remember that anything you build will either add or detract from your property's appearance and may impact your property value. Metal and vinyl materials may be easier to maintain, but are the least expensive options and tend to look cheap. Natural wood and prefinished wood products will add character and value, but are typically more expensive to buy and maintain.
Once you’ve received the package and all it entails, you can begin creating your own outdoor shed whenever you feel ready. The only time you need to exert the effort is when you’ve begun construction. When you do decide to start, make sure that you have a decent amount of time as well as motivation to carry through the whole project. You don’t want to be left with an unfinished shed out in the yard, a constant reminder that you tried and failed.

· Personal belongings storage shed — as you are growing older each and every day, you may tend to accumulate so many items that congest your house. You may not want to throw or give away any of the items accumulated as they probably hold a sentimental value to you. The best way in which you can solve a headache is by building yourself a shed which you can be storing your personal items as you continue accumulating them.

Also square the frame by making sure diagonal measurements from opposite corners are equal. Then tack one corner to hold it square. Finally, nail the soffit to the roof frame with 6d galvanized box nails. We used 12-in.-wide fiber cement siding for soffit material. Mount an inexpensive carbide blade on your circular saw to cut the fiber cement. Set the roof panel aside and build the other half of the roof using the same techniques.
Sheds have become multipurpose, must-have buildings that are competing with pergolas and gazebos as your next backyard project. Pictures on social media only grab people's desires more. Before going any further, do your research. Figure out what you need it for and why, and whether you will build the shed yourself, or hire a pro. Check with your local planning department to comply with codes and guidelines. Determine if the shed will mirror the architectural features of your home--always a good idea. Assess your budget, materials needed, and the time it will take to complete the project.
A lean to shed is the perfect way to build up against a fence or wall and still have plenty of room in your yard. It also keeps water away from the structure you are building up against. The lean to shed design is the simplest design of shed to build because of its single plane sloping roof which makes the roof easy to build. We have many different configurations and sizes either with double or single doors. The larger lean to designs include optional plans to build the doors on any side of the shed. Our smaller lean to style sheds have a 4 in 12 pitch roof and our larger designs have a 2 in 12 pitch roof to keep the overall shed height lower and help reduce shed construction costs.

Once you’ve figured out what you need the shed for, it’s easy to go forward with planning. Keep in mind that sheds, no matter how small in their size, are not exactly the best projects for beginner woodworkers. Sheds are one of the most complex woodworking items to build. Some bigger sheds resemble houses so it’s not a surprise a shed is a project for a skillful hand.

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