If you have the do-it-yourself skills and an open timeframe, check out the various plans available online or for purchase. Make sure you thoroughly understand the instructions and actually have the ability and tools to do the job. Other sources for sheds include prefabricated buildings that you would order from a reputable company and kits. Some include pre-cut lumber that is shipped to your house. Before ordering, find out if additional milling, drilling, or cutting will be needed, along with necessary tools.
You can even go online and look up prices!  For example, if you visit lowes.com, they have a search box where you can enter in the item and find out each price!  This will save you some time.  The only drawback I see to this is that I find it really beneficial to go to these big box lumber stores and see exactly what I want.  For example, the LP Smartside siding panels I recommend to use:  some stores carry a cheap variation of these that have a brown color to them on the inside of the panel, and this is not what you want!  The have the consistency of a 'fibre' panel that will crack easy.  The true LP siding panels are pre-primed on the outside surface and have a natural osb color on the inside surface.
The toughest and most important part of building a shed is finding the right plans. Sure you can just start building without plans, but do you know how it will look when you are done? Or you can search for free plans, but are they designed right? What I recommend is finding plans, even if it means you have to pay a little. Make sure that sample plans are provided so you know what you are getting. Do not make a purchase just because they show lots of nice sheds but no sample of the actual plans you will be buying. Look for the following before you decide to purchase:
A shed isn’t something you see people build…at least not very often. It’s rather the type of structure you discover in the backyard when you purchase an old house. So how do these things appear? They’re obviously built so let’s see what it takes so put a shed together. We looked around and we found a bunch of shed plans that we’d like to share with you. They’re pretty simple and you don’t need much experience with this sort of projects to be able to pull it off. They’re all customizable so you can enjoy them whether you want a pretty she shed or a manly workshop.
Proceeding with your shed requires smart planning. For starters, you may need a permit from your local zoning authority and/or homeowners’ association to build a new structure on your property; check with the proper authorities before you even invest in the materials. Plus, there may be rules that dictate how you may use your shed, or whether you’re allowed to wire it for electricity. Once you get the go-ahead to build, you’ll want reliable guidelines. For anyone inclined to DIY rather than buy a prebuilt shed, look over a selection of free LP Outdoor Building Solutions plans based on your choice of size and roof style. Each set of plans comes with extensive material and hardware lists, detailed construction information, and tried-and-true building tips.

You can even go online and look up prices!  For example, if you visit lowes.com, they have a search box where you can enter in the item and find out each price!  This will save you some time.  The only drawback I see to this is that I find it really beneficial to go to these big box lumber stores and see exactly what I want.  For example, the LP Smartside siding panels I recommend to use:  some stores carry a cheap variation of these that have a brown color to them on the inside of the panel, and this is not what you want!  The have the consistency of a 'fibre' panel that will crack easy.  The true LP siding panels are pre-primed on the outside surface and have a natural osb color on the inside surface.
Once you decide that adding a shed will increase the enjoyment of your outdoor space, it’s time to ask pertinent questions to assess your needs. Consider exactly how you want to use your shed, what design will best suit those tasks, and how much your budget will allow. Learn what features are most popular, and why. Also research what’s really involved with building a shed yourself, as opposed to hiring a pro to do the job, and be sure you understand such important factors as warranty and delivery.
It isn’t a requirement that this shed be built against a wall—but the structure is designed to take advantage of the wall for strength. So if you modify it to be a freestanding shed, you’ll need to build a conventional stud wall across the back and face it with the same type of plywood siding used on the rest of the shed. For information on how to mark, cut, and fasten wall studs, see How to Frame an Interior Wall (ignore the part about working with drywall because you’ll be using exterior-rated T1-11 siding instead).
The construction of a wood foundation is usually built using pressure-treated 2x6 lumbers. These parts are called the band on the ends and the joist in the middle of the band, spaced out 16-24 inches apart. The foundation frame will sit on top of pressure-treated 4x4 posts called skids. The skids will set on the cinder blocks or on top of gravel to prevent rot.
Each truss is made up of two 2 x 4 rafters and one 2 x 4 ceiling joist. The three boards are joined together with 1/2-in. plywood gussets. To speed up the assembly process, build all the trusses on the shed floor before erecting the walls. Start by cutting all the rafters to length with a 40° angle at one end of each. Cut 2 x 4s to 10 ft. long for the bottom chords of the trusses. Also, cut all of the plywood gussets.

The program consists of a wide range of downloadable files, which contain many different step by step instructions and plans related to woodworking. These tutorials are focused on a wide range of projects, such as potting shed plans, wood shed plans, storage shed plans, garage storage plans, house plans and more. All the shed plans discussed in this program are divided on the basis of each project type.

best shed plans

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