It can be easy to get excited and overestimate your DIY abilities when you start a new project. The passion and excitement makes you want to dream big and get creative. But blindly following your imagination can be a step in the wrong direction. If you’re a newbie to DIY woodworking, then you’ll probably want to keep it simple. Otherwise you run the real risk of ending up with a sub par build or even having to rebuild it altogether.
For a freestanding shed, you can build the shed on top of a concrete slab (see Pouring a Concrete Slab) instead of the pressure-treated skids and floor joists; this will actually result in a sturdier—more permanent— structure. Otherwise, for a freestanding shed, the foundation should be constructed on concrete piers or poured footings (see Pouring Concrete Footings & Piers).  Be aware that building on footings will raise the height of the shed up from the ground.
Our 14 by 24 one car garage was delivered and set up early November. The truck pulled up shortly before 7 am and left by 5 pm after the garage was completed and cleaned inside and out. Two carpenters worked tiredlessly without even a lunchbreak to make sure that everything was complete by the evening. Despite the workpressure the always had a kind word and did not mind to answer our stupid questions. We haven't seen such a work ethics for quite some time. On top of it, the garage looks terrific and matches the style of the house. When asked I will recommend Sheds Unlimited without any reservation - a job very well done!
There are several ways to economize when building a shed: Install three-tab roof shingles instead of architectural shingles, or use grooved-plywood siding in place of cedar bevel siding. But don't ever skimp on the building materials used for the floor frame or plywood floor deck. I can't tell you how often I've walked into a shed and found the floor to be dangerously spongy. One building in particular had a floor so badly rotted it felt like one of those inflatable moonwalk attractions you see at carnivals.
The construction of a wood foundation is usually built using pressure-treated 2x6 lumbers. These parts are called the band on the ends and the joist in the middle of the band, spaced out 16-24 inches apart. The foundation frame will sit on top of pressure-treated 4x4 posts called skids. The skids will set on the cinder blocks or on top of gravel to prevent rot.
One last thing about shed sizes, it’s a good idea to always measure out the dimensions in your own garden before you invest any money. You can do this easily by using a couple of stakes and a string to measure out the space. That’s how the pros do it. Make sure that you leave enough room on all sides of the shed to help with rain drainage and prevent water damage.

Finding MyShedPlans seemed too good to be true; 12k shed plans, 3-D renderings, detailed material lists, but wait, there's more! Hundreds of useful guides, woodworking books, and project ideas ranging from birdhouses to bridges. And what was more, was the promise of an easy download and immediate access to boundless amounts of material so I could be right on my way to a sharp new shed.

If your shed site slopes, pouring concrete is a bigger job because you have to build strong forms and pour extra concrete on the downhill side. A simpler method is to build your shed floor like a deck, with footings, posts and a wood frame covered by plywood. If you don’t like the opening under the shed, build a skirt to cover the space between the shed floor and the ground.

We provide outdoor shed plans that are affordable and easy to build from. Our storage shed plans are organized so that you can buy shed plans and build your own shed no matter what your skill level. There are helpful how to build instructions and tips that go along with each stage of the storage building process from the foundation, floor, walls to the roof. Building your own shed saves you money and is a very rewarding experience that adds value to your property. Click the shed images above to view our library of over 200 storage shed plans.
Don Vandervort has developed his expertise for more than 30 years, as Building Editor for Sunset Books, Senior Editor at Home Magazine, author of more than 30 home improvement books, and writer of countless magazine articles. He appeared for 3 seasons on HGTV’s “The Fix,” and served as MSN’s home expert for several years. Don founded HomeTips in 1996.
Once you decide that adding a shed will increase the enjoyment of your outdoor space, it’s time to ask pertinent questions to assess your needs. Consider exactly how you want to use your shed, what design will best suit those tasks, and how much your budget will allow. Learn what features are most popular, and why. Also research what’s really involved with building a shed yourself, as opposed to hiring a pro to do the job, and be sure you understand such important factors as warranty and delivery.

These days, it is not very easy to translate your wooden shed plans into a standard written format without losing any valuable information. In order to learn how to build high quality wooden sheds, it is important to consult an expert. However, consulting an expert may not be viable for every individual. In addition to this, the internet provides you with extensive information about a wide range of subjects.
A shed is a simple roofed single floor structure that is used for storage of garden tools, shelter domestic animals, performing out hobbies and also as a workshop. They can also be referred to as outhouse, outbuilding or shack. They are mostly situated in the back garden. Sheds vary in their sizes from large sheds to small sheds depending on their purposes. Storage sheds are mostly small in size but industrial and farm sheds are mostly large depending on the volume of the goods they hold. Sheds can be built from different materials like wood, metals, and plastic. The types of shed construction include metal sheathing, plastic sheathing, and complete wood construction.
This is another shed building tip about the location of your shed. While it would be great to let your shed blend into the shrubbery on your property, but it isn’t really realistic. You want to allow your shed to breathe which means giving it space from trees, fences and shrubs. A few feet all around will let the materials breathe effectively and direct sunlight will ensure mold and mildew stay far away.
The last thing you want is to build a shed only to discover that it’s too small to hold your stuff, handle your hobby, or otherwise meet your needs. By the same token, you don’t want a shed that’s so large it overwhelms your property and looks ungainly behind your house. Choosing the wrong size shed is a common homeowner error, but LP Outdoor Building Solutions’ handy tool helps you get it just right. Check it out, and you’ll see that size does matter!
We assembled each layer with pocket screws before gluing the two layers together, but if you don’t own a pocket hole setup, you could simply screw through the overlapping boards instead. Complete the door frame. Then cut the 4 x 8-ft. grooved plywood to fit the lower recess, and cut a piece of 1/4-in. acrylic sheet to fit the upper recess. Secure the plywood and acrylic sheet with 1/2-in. x 1/2-in. moldings nailed to the inside. Sand the edges of the door flush.
• Improper geographical placement — this is one of the huge mistakes one may make while shed building. It may be too close to your house hence obstructing your beautiful view from your living room or your kitchen as you are cooking. The last thing one would want is not like your house because of a simple thing as a view, so be careful with where you place your shed. One may also build the shed too far away from their house which again is an inconvenience. Who would want to walk from your house to your shed to get some tool you need and you have to trek some long distance? You may also need your shed someplace you can see due to the security reasons. You would want some stupid thief taking your stuff without you see them, would you? Or walking down a snowy lane during a chilly night just so you could get something from your shed. Before building your shed consider all the factors whether positive or negative and then come up with the place in your compound with the most advantages compared to disadvantages.

The construction of a wood foundation is usually built using pressure-treated 2x6 lumbers. These parts are called the band on the ends and the joist in the middle of the band, spaced out 16-24 inches apart. The foundation frame will sit on top of pressure-treated 4x4 posts called skids. The skids will set on the cinder blocks or on top of gravel to prevent rot.
Each truss is made up of two 2 x 4 rafters and one 2 x 4 ceiling joist. The three boards are joined together with 1/2-in. plywood gussets. To speed up the assembly process, build all the trusses on the shed floor before erecting the walls. Start by cutting all the rafters to length with a 40° angle at one end of each. Cut 2 x 4s to 10 ft. long for the bottom chords of the trusses. Also, cut all of the plywood gussets.
• Stagnant waters — As much as the wood is coated to protect it from water, it would still be advisable to keep the wood away from stagnant waters. This is as the wood coating is not a permanent coat and so is the wood is exposed to water it will get damaged over time. The best way to avoid water paddles near the shed is building gutter systems on its roof which directs the water to a tank or a pool.
The toughest and most important part of building a shed is finding the right plans. Sure you can just start building without plans, but do you know how it will look when you are done? Or you can search for free plans, but are they designed right? What I recommend is finding plans, even if it means you have to pay a little. Make sure that sample plans are provided so you know what you are getting. Do not make a purchase just because they show lots of nice sheds but no sample of the actual plans you will be buying. Look for the following before you decide to purchase:
A shed-like companion residence was built adjacent to the existing house on this property in Austin, Texas. Designed and constructed by Moontower, the structure features exposed plywood, blackened steel, clear sealed cedar, and pine, exposed structural elements, and utilitarian lighting fixtures. A balcony gives the building a treehouse feel and offers views of the Austin skyline and a nearby college bell tower.
Remember that anything you build will either add or detract from your property's appearance and may impact your property value. Metal and vinyl materials may be easier to maintain, but are the least expensive options and tend to look cheap. Natural wood and prefinished wood products will add character and value, but are typically more expensive to buy and maintain.
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