Building a Shed should be a fun project that provides the satisfaction of creating something and a sense of accomplishment. We have put great effort into our shed plans to make them easy to follow and work from. The How To Build A Shed eBook that is included with every shed plan is designed to show all the different steps involved in building a shed. The materials list is detailed out so that every part of the shed has a label which makes it easier to put each part where it goes. Let us know how your shed building project goes, we love to hear about and see photos of our customers building their sheds! Find the email address at the top of this page to send in your shed building photos.
A shed is a simple roofed single floor structure that is used for storage of garden tools, shelter domestic animals, performing out hobbies and also as a workshop. They can also be referred to as outhouse, outbuilding or shack. They are mostly situated in the back garden. Sheds vary in their sizes from large sheds to small sheds depending on their purposes. Storage sheds are mostly small in size but industrial and farm sheds are mostly large depending on the volume of the goods they hold. Sheds can be built from different materials like wood, metals, and plastic. The types of shed construction include metal sheathing, plastic sheathing, and complete wood construction.
This shed, one of our most popular outdoor storage sheds ever, features some unique details that make it look more expensive than it really was to build. Arch-top windows and a custom door give this shed a high-quality look that belies its low cost and simple construction. The panelized construction technique means you could build the parts in your garage on a rainy weekend and then haul them to the site for assembly. Modest finishes like OSB siding and composite trim and fiberglass shingles help keep the materials cost low. And you’ll save hundreds of dollars by providing your own labor to build the door and windows for some cheap outdoor storage. The modular construction and wood platform foundation mean you can construct this shed almost anywhere, even on remote or sloping sites. In this article, we’ll show you the basics of how to build the shed and install the windows and doors.
Because the shed is designed to abut to another structure, the foundation need only be pressure-treated skids, the roof pitched in only one direction to shed water, and the back wall sheathed with 1/2-inch CDX plywood, which withstands indirect exposure to moisture. See Anatomy of an Outdoor Shed or Playhouse for more about typical shed construction.
Once you’ve figured out what you need the shed for, it’s easy to go forward with planning. Keep in mind that sheds, no matter how small in their size, are not exactly the best projects for beginner woodworkers. Sheds are one of the most complex woodworking items to build. Some bigger sheds resemble houses so it’s not a surprise a shed is a project for a skillful hand.
In a perfect world, all of the studs would be straight, but since they aren’t, make sure to pick the best ones to use at corners and at door and window openings. Sight down the length of the studs and set aside the ones that are perfectly straight. While you’re at it, also set aside studs that are really crooked. You can cut these up to use as cripples or blocking. You may find other uses for short pieces later on.
My advice... Don't do-it-all-yourself. Novice and pro alike can benefit from each other in DIY. You might have the shed location leveled by a landscaper; get a referral to outsource the shed's foundation to a building subcontractor; you can even have the roof's trusses made by a local truss company and the shingles installed by a handyman or roofer.
But I've never drilled a pilot hole in my life, so what do I know. No seriously, unless it's super delicate or thin, I just use the impact driver and make it work. Sure, sometimes the wood splits a bit, but I don't care about looks and most of my projects are built with pallets and discarded stuff anyway. But the thought of predrilling every hole?? And messing a corded driver?? Come on dude, that's laughable!
Build rafters across the roof and separate them with blocking. These should overhang the walls of your shed for increased weather protection. Again, your measurements will be greatly simplified if you space the rafters the same way that you spaced your floor joists. When you’re done, attach pieces of blocking between each pair of rafters along the top plates.[10]
Building a shed has lots of advantages which can vary for each person. For example, you could use the shed as a storage space for bicycles in winter. Another option is to use the shed as a storage space for large equipment like the lawnmower or the garden tools. You could also use the shed as a workspace whenever you’re doing DIY projects which is quite funny because the shed itself can be one such project. If you’re the recycling type, you can put a hatch on the side specifically for this purpose and place the bins inside. In any case, a sturdy shed can serve you for many years to come and the shed plans offered on todaysplans show you how to ensure that.
A saltbox shed is defined by its double sloping roof style. The front roof has a steep slope of 12/12, and the rear roof has a lower slope of 5/12. Most plans have options for the doors on either the front or side. Click on the images to view more details. The saltbox style evolved from the practice of extending the second floor roof line down to the first floor level to create additional covered living space. The design adds a south eastern flair to back yard shed designs.
Can you believe that building this cedar shed costs less than $300?! Yes, you read that right – a retail price for something similar can be around $1600, so this is one heck of a good deal. Not only is it incredibly good looking and budget friendly, it’s big enough to store all your outdoor items yet it won’t get in your way thanks to the compact design.
High-quality materials may cost a bit more, but they’ll save you time, trouble, and money in the long run. The chart here shows how LP® SmartSide® Panels compare with untreated plywood, vinyl, and galvanized metal. No wonder so many pros recommend sheds made with beautiful, durable LP products! If you want your shed to resist splitting, cracking, decay, and termite damage while duplicating the good looks of rich, real cedar, choose LP SmartSide® products.
Level the ground (if necessary) and install deck piers along a grid to support the shed. The piers will allow you to string support beams beneath the floor of the shed. In the example design, the piers are spaced 6 feet (1.8 m) apart in one direction and 4 feet (1.2 m) apart in the other for a total grid area of 12 x 8 feet. This is convenient because once you lay supports along this grid, it will take exactly three standard 4- by 8-foot plywood sheets to cover it.[1]
Backyard Shed Plans Barn Shed Plans Chicken Coop Plans Compost bin Plans Corner Shed Plans Detached Garage Plans Dormer Shed Plans Firewood Shed Plans Garage Shed Plans Garden Shed Plans Generator Shed Plans Greenhouse Shed Plans Hip Roof Shed Plans Horse Barn Plans Large Shed Plans Lean To Shed Plans Loft Shed Plans Low Income Housing Plans Metric Garden Sheds Modern Shed Plans Porch Shed Plans Run In Shed Plans Saltbox Shed Plans Short Shed Plans
×