This shed, one of our most popular outdoor storage sheds ever, features some unique details that make it look more expensive than it really was to build. Arch-top windows and a custom door give this shed a high-quality look that belies its low cost and simple construction. The panelized construction technique means you could build the parts in your garage on a rainy weekend and then haul them to the site for assembly. Modest finishes like OSB siding and composite trim and fiberglass shingles help keep the materials cost low. And you’ll save hundreds of dollars by providing your own labor to build the door and windows for some cheap outdoor storage. The modular construction and wood platform foundation mean you can construct this shed almost anywhere, even on remote or sloping sites. In this article, we’ll show you the basics of how to build the shed and install the windows and doors.

This garden shed is the tiniest, but that’s the beauty of it – it’s exactly the right size to store your gardening tools. As there are more details (all in order to give you more storaging options), it might take a little longer to build this shed than the others, also the makers of the plan have said it cost around $400 to build this, but the shed is definitely one of a kind and worth the efforts.
· Wood sheds — these types of sheds are made of wood. They are the most common type of shed compared to metal and plastics. They are the most conducive as they can be used as children playhouses, outdoor office and still storage of garden tools. They are also easy to modify and renovate as increasing their size. They are preferred to other types as they blend well with the environment and give the environment a good natural look. However, they must be maintained regularly from insects as termites which feed on wood.
Start by setting deck blocks on the ground, positioned as shown in the plans. While the area doesn’t have to be perfectly level, you should make the ground roughly level where each block will rest. Temporarily place some straight 2-by-6 lumber on edge in the top grooves of the blocks to orient the blocks in a straight line. Arrange two rows of four blocks parallel to each other to form both long walls, then measure diagonally across the outside corners to determine how square the arrangement is. If the two long walls are parallel, and diagonal measurements taken across corners are equal, then each corner is guaranteed to be 90 degrees. Finish up by placing one deck block in the middle of each 6-foot wall after you have aligned and squared the 8-foot walls.
A garden shed can be strictly functional, but it can also be a decorative focal point around which you design your garden or yard. These plans will help you build a basic shed, but don’t stop there! To customize your shed, you could create a combination toolshed and greenhouse, put a martin house on top, or use part of the shed for a chicken coop or rabbit hutch. If you’re feeling even more adventurous, you could create a living roof of moss or succulent plants.
Before a hammer hits a nail: plan, plan, and plan some more. All too often people visit local home centers to get shed ideas. They go inside the prebuilt sheds in the parking lot and decide their own storage needs right then and there. Even worse, they'll grab a few brochures and use those ideas to find a shed design online without doing any proper space planning.
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Because the shed is designed to abut to another structure, the foundation need only be pressure-treated skids, the roof pitched in only one direction to shed water, and the back wall sheathed with 1/2-inch CDX plywood, which withstands indirect exposure to moisture. See Anatomy of an Outdoor Shed or Playhouse for more about typical shed construction.
My Shed Plans just might be every do-it-yourself junkie’s dream product. Ryan Henderson, the creator of My Shed Plans, has been building one-of-a-kind outdoor sheds for more than 20 years. If you believe his story, he has unselfishly decided to share his love of woodworking and carpentry through his guides which will enable the everyman who does not have handyman experience to build their very own outdoor shed. Can it be true?
Before a hammer hits a nail: plan, plan, and plan some more. All too often people visit local home centers to get shed ideas. They go inside the prebuilt sheds in the parking lot and decide their own storage needs right then and there. Even worse, they'll grab a few brochures and use those ideas to find a shed design online without doing any proper space planning.
• Failure to account for climate — some people build sheds without considering the weather patterns experienced in the area. The shed ends up being exposed to harsh climatic conditions, continued exposure of the shed to such adverse climatic conditions lead to its destruction. This then leads to one spending much more money to repair the shed. The most common way in which people fail to protect their sheds from is rainwater and snow by failing to have the necessary protecting tools such as gutters and drainage trenches. Gutters are important as they direct rainwater away from the shed hence protecting the shed from getting destructed by rainwater and melting snow that is on the roof. Drainage trenches direct the water that falls directly to the ground away from the shed. These methods keep the wood used to build the sheds dry and hence they do not absorb moisture that may encourage the growth of fungi on the wood. As we have seen earlier, it is also important to coat the wood with protective coats as paint to prevent them from coming into any contact with moisture.

Once you’ve figured out what you need the shed for, it’s easy to go forward with planning. Keep in mind that sheds, no matter how small in their size, are not exactly the best projects for beginner woodworkers. Sheds are one of the most complex woodworking items to build. Some bigger sheds resemble houses so it’s not a surprise a shed is a project for a skillful hand.
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