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As you can see, I have no pictures of the doors being created.  This is because they took way too much trouble to make, and I didn't really have the patience to take pictures of them being built because they were tested and redone about 3 times.  Lesson to be learned:  leave the tolerances bigger than you think they will need to be, you can always use weather strips to help close them up later.  After 3 attempts, we finnally got the doors to work properly.  The one door is held in place with sliding dead-bolts to the floor and ceiling frames and the second door is attached to it with another dead-bolt.
After the concrete is all ready, the sole plates are then joined together with the anchor plates which protrude out of the foundation. Use the carpenter’s pencil and measuring tape to mark about one and a half inches from the board end continually every sixteen inches till the further end. These marks guide where the studs will be placed. Mark where the anchor and the mudsill meet up with a different marker from the one used initially. The studs are then taken and galvanized nails are driven through the marked areas into the center of the board until they reach the stud bottom. The studs should be secured to the baseboard.

In reality, the Ryan Shed Plans also known as MyShedPlans Elite; is a huge collection of different wood construction plans, craft designs, shed blueprints, storage shed designs, birdhouse designs, garage designs, rocking horse sheds and even the end table designs. All the plans that are contained in Ryan Shed Plans contain step by step instructions like you have expected, and therefore, these are more than just mere designs. They naturally include a variety of blueprints of the same shed design the plan, the elevations, the sections, perspective of the shed, a description, legend containing the materials, tips and tricks but a few of them admittedly are not as designed as the rest.​

A garden shed can be strictly functional, but it can also be a decorative focal point around which you design your garden or yard. These plans will help you build a basic shed, but don’t stop there! To customize your shed, you could create a combination toolshed and greenhouse, put a martin house on top, or use part of the shed for a chicken coop or rabbit hutch. If you’re feeling even more adventurous, you could create a living roof of moss or succulent plants.
If you plan to paint your shed, natural wood siding isn’t necessary. You can buy sheets of OSB (oriented strand board) siding at a fraction of the cost of real plywood, and it’ll probably last longer too. LP SmartSide panel is one brand. You can buy plain, grooved or stucco-like panels in several thicknesses and sizes. Ask at your local lumberyard to see what’s available.
You can cut steel roofing panels with a circular saw and a carbide blade, but it’ll save you a lot of work if you order the panels the right length to start with. Plus, you’ll have a greater color selection if you order the roofing rather than buy off-the-shelf panels. Remember to order in advance, though, since it usually takes several weeks for the roofing to arrive. And make sure the overhangs are the right size so the panels will overhang the fascia slightly.
Cut the sill piece and assemble the windows with pocket screws. Using a router with a 3/8-in. rabbet bit, rout a 3/8-in.-deep recess on the back of the window to receive the 1/4-in. Plexiglas acrylic sheet (Photo 14). Set the window frame, recessed side down, over a piece of acrylic sheet and trace the shape with a permanent marker. Cut the curve with a fine-tooth jigsaw blade and the straight sections with a fine-tooth blade in a table saw or circular saw.

Among our builder plans, we have developed a wide range of shed designs, which we offer in form of DIY plans. If you purchase them, you will receive a detailed shed blueprints and building instructions, from the foundations to the roof, with precise measurements in both metric and imperial systems and full list of materials required for the shed. Our garden sheds, storage sheds and gazebo plans are created in a way to make the construction process comprehensive and easy to build for anyone. Especially easy are the lean-to shed plans, narrow but spacious, very practical and possible to attach to any building or wall.
The best spot for a shed is level, well-drained ground close to where you work in your garden or yard. The location doesn’t need to be perfectly flat; the foundation design shown in the plans allows for adjustments to make the floor level. Small sheds require only a top-of-soil foundation, even in locations with freezing winter temperatures. Precast concrete deck blocks work perfectly for this.
Did we forget to mention that when you work on the shed yourself, you have the freedom of using the material you want? For instance, if you buy a shed building kit, you will simply be limited to the material that comes with it. But, when you are building the shed yourself, you have all the freedom in the world to pick and choose whatever you like. However, considering you don’t have much experience with building sheds, how would you know what material is better suited? Well, that’s where our free and premium plan come into play. Our plans come with complete lists of materials, hardware and tools that you would require to build the shed alongside their required quantity. We also suggest any alternate material that you can buy if anything is unavailable. You can add the type of doors you want or the windows while we give you the dimensions and how to work around them. Our plans are simple yet powerful and they help while you build your dream shed.
High-quality materials may cost a bit more, but they’ll save you time, trouble, and money in the long run. The chart here shows how LP® SmartSide® Panels compare with untreated plywood, vinyl, and galvanized metal. No wonder so many pros recommend sheds made with beautiful, durable LP products! If you want your shed to resist splitting, cracking, decay, and termite damage while duplicating the good looks of rich, real cedar, choose LP SmartSide® products.

The trick for learning how to build a storage shed is to stretch the line across a scrap of wood at each end so there’s a space between the line and the part you’re straightening. On a wall, for example, tack small scraps of 1/2-in. plywood at each end of the top plate and stretch a line very tightly over the plywood. Then use a third scrap as a gauge to check the distance between the line and the lumber. Use braces or whatever is needed to adjust the top plate until the gauge just fits. Now your top plate will be perfectly straight.
The walls of the foundation have been created and the electrical is all set, now all that needs to be done is to fill the gaping hole in between them with limestone agrigate.  We also threw in some concrete paving stones that we had lying around because we don't plan on using them and we had already tried to give them away.  After the limestone is in place tamp it down by jumping on it and keep filling up any places that are no longer level.  After the entire base is filled with as much limestone as you can fit put a sprinkler on to soak it and set it for the next hour or so.  You may need to add a bit more limestone after this is done as well.
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