For example, the last three sheds I built were trimmed with white PVC trim boards instead of painted cedar 1 x 4s. This new plastic lumber, which I used for the rake, fascia, frieze and corner boards, is impervious to bugs, warping, splitting or decay, and it never needs painting. Other low-maintenance options include: vinyl or aluminum windows, faux-slate roof shingles, fiberglass or steel doors, composite decking for steps, and fiber-cement siding. (I don't usually recommend aluminum or vinyl siding for sheds; neither material is rugged enough to survive the inevitable beating outbuildings take.)
Because the shed is designed to abut to another structure, the foundation need only be pressure-treated skids, the roof pitched in only one direction to shed water, and the back wall sheathed with 1/2-inch CDX plywood, which withstands indirect exposure to moisture. See Anatomy of an Outdoor Shed or Playhouse for more about typical shed construction.
Ryan Henderson is a master woodworker with over 30 years experience and has developed Ryan’s Shed Plans.  This is a detailed digital book with 12,000 shed plans available for instant download with many different bonus offers.  The plans are detailed because they are written by a master woodworker.  He has taught many newbie woodworkers over the past 30 years how to build sheds and other woodworking projects.  He is skilled in the art of woodworking and put together a nice, large set of plans.  The plans are easy to read with step-by-step instructions.
Included with your instant download will be email support from me about any questions you might have on how to build a shed or about the plans or construction methods covered. I am very pleased to offer this service for the low price I charge, but believe it or not, I don't get that many support inquiries and I feel this is because of the comprehensive nature of the plans for all the information needed to successfully build your own shed.
Ø Clay tiled sheds — as the name suggests, these are sheds that their roofs consist of clay tiles. The clay tiles make the wooden sheds look visually appealing. Nevertheless, one has to plan for the clay tiles from the foundation of the shed so that it can support the roof due to the bulkiness of the roof. The wooden walls need to be strong enough to support the roof. It would be advisable to hire an expert to install the clay tiled roof to avoid complications.

The shed we built rests on a foundation made up of 12 solid-concrete blocks. The 4 x 8 x 16-in. blocks are arranged in three rows spaced 59 in. apart. These blocks are typically set directly on the ground, but we put down a 4-in. bed of gravel first because our site occasionally receives groundwater. The gravel will keep the soil beneath the shed from eroding or becoming soggy.
We’ve simplified the door-hanging process by mounting the door to a 1-1/2-in.-thick trim piece and then screwing the trim to the wall. An easy way to mark and cut matching hinge recesses in both the door and the trim is to clamp the trim alongside the door, making sure it extends 1/8 in. beyond the top of the door. Then mark the hinge cutout on both the door and the trim at the same time.
For example, the last three sheds I built were trimmed with white PVC trim boards instead of painted cedar 1 x 4s. This new plastic lumber, which I used for the rake, fascia, frieze and corner boards, is impervious to bugs, warping, splitting or decay, and it never needs painting. Other low-maintenance options include: vinyl or aluminum windows, faux-slate roof shingles, fiberglass or steel doors, composite decking for steps, and fiber-cement siding. (I don't usually recommend aluminum or vinyl siding for sheds; neither material is rugged enough to survive the inevitable beating outbuildings take.)
Remember that anything you build will either add or detract from your property's appearance and may impact your property value. Metal and vinyl materials may be easier to maintain, but are the least expensive options and tend to look cheap. Natural wood and prefinished wood products will add character and value, but are typically more expensive to buy and maintain.

The walls of the foundation have been created and the electrical is all set, now all that needs to be done is to fill the gaping hole in between them with limestone agrigate.  We also threw in some concrete paving stones that we had lying around because we don't plan on using them and we had already tried to give them away.  After the limestone is in place tamp it down by jumping on it and keep filling up any places that are no longer level.  After the entire base is filled with as much limestone as you can fit put a sprinkler on to soak it and set it for the next hour or so.  You may need to add a bit more limestone after this is done as well.


A backyard shed frees up your home and garage by storing cumbersome essentials like your riding mower, hedge trimmers, and other lawn care equipment. But these sturdy little buildings can serve a host of other practical functions—and hobbies too. Think chicken coop, greenhouse, screening room—the list is limitless! For a shed to live up to its potential, however, it’s crucial to avoid common building mistakes. The dos and don’ts listed here, courtesy of the LP® Outdoor Building Solutions® pros, will help ensure that your shed meets your needs for years to come, whether you’re simply using it for storage or tricking it out as your outdoor fun zone.

Water is wood's worst enemy. Given the right circumstance and enough time, excessive moisture can rot framing, warp floors and doors, corrode hinges and breed mold and mildew. Fortunately, there's an easy remedy. First, be sure that the lowest wood member--the mudsill--is at least 6 in. above the ground. That's sufficient space to allow fresh air to circulate under the shed.

The walls of the foundation have been created and the electrical is all set, now all that needs to be done is to fill the gaping hole in between them with limestone agrigate.  We also threw in some concrete paving stones that we had lying around because we don't plan on using them and we had already tried to give them away.  After the limestone is in place tamp it down by jumping on it and keep filling up any places that are no longer level.  After the entire base is filled with as much limestone as you can fit put a sprinkler on to soak it and set it for the next hour or so.  You may need to add a bit more limestone after this is done as well.

My advice... Don't do-it-all-yourself. Novice and pro alike can benefit from each other in DIY. You might have the shed location leveled by a landscaper; get a referral to outsource the shed's foundation to a building subcontractor; you can even have the roof's trusses made by a local truss company and the shingles installed by a handyman or roofer.


When you have around 12,000 plans that are claimed to be shed designs, not all of them can be good. Some of them are predominant, some of them are mediocre while some of them are utterly absurd and are even hard to read. There are even incomplete plans in the Ryan Shed Plans package, and many of these plans don’t include the materials, making it frustrating. The download pages of most of the designs in Ryan Shed Plans are not organized.
Now, if the only need for the present is a shed that’s large, consider purchasing garden shed plans blueprints for small sheds at the same time. You might need small storage spaces in the future or there are items that need to be stored separately. For example, for storing dangerous things like pesticides, gasoline and herbicides, the most appropriate sheds are small plastic sheds.
The last thing you want is to build a shed only to discover that it’s too small to hold your stuff, handle your hobby, or otherwise meet your needs. By the same token, you don’t want a shed that’s so large it overwhelms your property and looks ungainly behind your house. Choosing the wrong size shed is a common homeowner error, but LP Outdoor Building Solutions’ handy tool helps you get it just right. Check it out, and you’ll see that size does matter!
Also square the frame by making sure diagonal measurements from opposite corners are equal. Then tack one corner to hold it square. Finally, nail the soffit to the roof frame with 6d galvanized box nails. We used 12-in.-wide fiber cement siding for soffit material. Mount an inexpensive carbide blade on your circular saw to cut the fiber cement. Set the roof panel aside and build the other half of the roof using the same techniques.

Apparently, most guides provide you with the same old information that doesn’t offer any benefits to a gardening or DIY enthusiast. Fortunately, you can benefit from programs like My Shed Plans. This exceptional program is easily available on the internet at an affordable price, and helps you learn everything about building a shed in your garden or backyard.


A shed could double as a greenhouse, in which case you can use the shed plans provided on instructables. In this particular case, the shed was built out of old windows. An old window isn’t exactly something you can repurpose easily but here it’s a perfect fit. The first step is to gather enough windows. After that, it’s time to build the frame and you’ll need some wood for this part. Make sure the foundation is secure before you screw in the windows.

We have a large selection of small horse barn plans, tack rooms and run in shed plans. Each of our designs comes with a materials list and construction plans to help you save time and money when you build. We have many different sizes of horse barns including one, two, three and four stalls. Most of the barns and run in sheds are designed to be built with pine board and batten siding on the outside and a 4' tall Oak kick board on the interior.

Building a shed has lots of advantages which can vary for each person. For example, you could use the shed as a storage space for bicycles in winter. Another option is to use the shed as a storage space for large equipment like the lawnmower or the garden tools. You could also use the shed as a workspace whenever you’re doing DIY projects which is quite funny because the shed itself can be one such project. If you’re the recycling type, you can put a hatch on the side specifically for this purpose and place the bins inside. In any case, a sturdy shed can serve you for many years to come and the shed plans offered on todaysplans show you how to ensure that.
I did my wall studs and roof rafters at 24″ on center, so I used 2 x 6’s for the roof. Also, I made loft storage in the rafters of the front and back 5′ or so and left the middle 6′ or so open for access to the lofts and better lighting. I left the lower cords out in the middle trusses and reinforced them with hurricane ties and extra blocking. To better support the front and back loft floors I doubled up the lower cords on the front and back truss and on the two on either side of the opening and then floored the lofts with 2/4″ plywood. I also put four 14″ x 14″ plastic skylights in tht roof over the center open area to let additional light in.
For a freestanding shed, you can build the shed on top of a concrete slab (see Pouring a Concrete Slab) instead of the pressure-treated skids and floor joists; this will actually result in a sturdier—more permanent— structure. Otherwise, for a freestanding shed, the foundation should be constructed on concrete piers or poured footings (see Pouring Concrete Footings & Piers).  Be aware that building on footings will raise the height of the shed up from the ground.
At times, this information may seem overwhelming. You need to consider buying a program that provides you with all the information in a simple and concise manner. It is important to understand the value of your effort, money and time. One of the most common and biggest problems with online tutorials and guides is that they give just a glimpse of what you are buying. Thus, you don’t have a clear idea of what you are getting into.
You will find that the shed blueprints are mostly just that. These are not step-by-step instructional material like you might think. Instead, they are merely design drawings. They include a variety of views, (plan, elevation, perspective), and a description. Sometimes you’ll get a materials list. And while there are admittedly a few that give full instructions, most of them are just shed designs and plans. But because they’re from different sources, some of them are the wrong way round.
A lean to shed is the perfect way to build up against a fence or wall and still have plenty of room in your yard. It also keeps water away from the structure you are building up against. The lean to shed design is the simplest design of shed to build because of its single plane sloping roof which makes the roof easy to build. We have many different configurations and sizes either with double or single doors. The larger lean to designs include optional plans to build the doors on any side of the shed. Our smaller lean to style sheds have a 4 in 12 pitch roof and our larger designs have a 2 in 12 pitch roof to keep the overall shed height lower and help reduce shed construction costs.
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