How big should a garden shed be so it can be practical without occupying more space than it has to? Well…it depends. I think this cute little garden shed from acultivatednest has one of the smallest possible footprints. The fact that it’s small but tall allows it to be quite practical. It’s great for the storage of garden tools and there’s even some room for a shelf or two or for a few hooks on the walls.
We have a large selection of small horse barn plans, tack rooms and run in shed plans. Each of our designs comes with a materials list and construction plans to help you save time and money when you build. We have many different sizes of horse barns including one, two, three and four stalls. Most of the barns and run in sheds are designed to be built with pine board and batten siding on the outside and a 4' tall Oak kick board on the interior.

A thing you might want to check is if regulations require a minimum setback from the property line. This is often overlooked and come back to bite you. A silly thing I found out when I built my shed, my jurisdiction in California treats buildings differently depending on what they are called on the permit. I called my shed a barn because I built a gambrel roof and it looked like a barn. My surprise....A barn must be 50 feet away from any structures occupied by humans. A shed can be almost against the house.....same size, same shape,,,just different names.

A How To Buid A Shed e-Book that comes free with every shed plan order. This e-Book has over 50 pages of illustrations showing each step to building all the roof types shown on our shed building plans, how to frame shed walls, how to frame a shed floor, how to install siding, how to build roof rafters and trusses. It also includes nailing schedules and optional roof details.
Now we can actually start building!  Before you start putting down cinderblocks, lay limestone screening down in all of the channels and run and burry your electrical.  Make sure that your electrical wires are clearly marked (we used caution tape) so that nobody digs them up accidentally in the future.  Once your all set, you can start putting down some cinderblocks.  You may need to break some cinderblocks in half, and this is easily done with a chisel, a hammer, and a bit of time.  Tip:  Set Rebar posts in each corner and tie strings across to help you keep the walls straight.  You need to check every single block for level, especially on this layer as the base of the foundation will affect the rest of the foundation and in turn affect the main structure.
Working from ladders is more dangerous than working from scaffolding. Plus, having to constantly move ladders around is time consuming. When you get to the roof construction, consider renting a set of scaffolding with wheels. You’ll be amazed at how much easier it is to have a stable platform to work from and to set your tools and materials on. You can rent a 5-ft.-tall section of scaffold with three planks and wheels for about $110 per week.

DIY Shed Plans

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