It’s unconventional, but building the roof upside down on the platform has advantages. First, you avoid a lot of ladder work. And second, you can nail the soffit material to the overhangs easily without having to work overhead and in cramped spaces. You do have to take a little extra care to make sure the framing is square and the perimeter 2x4s are perfectly straight before nailing on the soffit, though. Start by cutting out the rafters using the pattern in Figure D as a guide.
Materials for this door cost about $140. A similar style prehung exterior door can easily cost more than $1,000. Of course, this door isn’t as weather-tight as a prehung door, and it wouldn’t work on your house, but it’s perfect for a shed. You get the look of an expensive custom wood door without the cost, it’s one of those awesome shed ideas that look great.
This step by step diy woodworking project is about diy shed plans. If you want to learn more about how to build a shed in your backyard, we recommend you to pay attention to the instructions described in the article. Work with attention and invest in high quality materials, as to use the shed for many years in a row. Plan everything from the very beginning, including the building permit that is required in some cases.

The best spot for a shed is level, well-drained ground close to where you work in your garden or yard. The location doesn’t need to be perfectly flat; the foundation design shown in the plans allows for adjustments to make the floor level. Small sheds require only a top-of-soil foundation, even in locations with freezing winter temperatures. Precast concrete deck blocks work perfectly for this.
If you are looking for the best collection of outdoor shed plans, then look no further. ‘My Shed Plans’ by Ryan Henderson’ is perhaps among the best collection of shed plans you can find anywhere today. It is a collection of around 12,000 woodworking plans which are designed to cater to the needs of both professional and amateur woodworkers. With over 20 years of experience in shed building, Ryan is an authority in the field. His plans are explained well with step by step instructions. If you follow his shed plans and instructions properly, you will be able to build one with ease. It doesn’t matter if your woodworking skills are basic or if you have failed in making a shed before, by following his shed plans you can undertake any such project with confidence.
From start to finish, it may seem a little intimidating, but just take it one step at a time. The nice thing about building a shed is that it starts off easy (layout the foundation, building the floor, etc.), and by the time you get to some of the more daunting tasks (like the roof), you would have gained a lot of confidence/experience working your way to that point.
We built the Colonial-style garden shed shown here from a set of mail-order building plans. The 10 x 16-ft. outbuilding has easy-to-install plywood siding, three large windows and two pairs of doors. The entire building could be used for storage, but we decided to divide the interior space into two separate areas: a 4 x 10-ft. tool-storage area and a 10 x 12-ft. children's playroom.

A shed could double as a greenhouse, in which case you can use the shed plans provided on instructables. In this particular case, the shed was built out of old windows. An old window isn’t exactly something you can repurpose easily but here it’s a perfect fit. The first step is to gather enough windows. After that, it’s time to build the frame and you’ll need some wood for this part. Make sure the foundation is secure before you screw in the windows.
The toughest and most important part of building a shed is finding the right plans. Sure you can just start building without plans, but do you know how it will look when you are done? Or you can search for free plans, but are they designed right? What I recommend is finding plans, even if it means you have to pay a little. Make sure that sample plans are provided so you know what you are getting. Do not make a purchase just because they show lots of nice sheds but no sample of the actual plans you will be buying. Look for the following before you decide to purchase:
Building a Shed should be a fun project that provides the satisfaction of creating something and a sense of accomplishment. We have put great effort into our shed plans to make them easy to follow and work from. The How To Build A Shed eBook that is included with every shed plan is designed to show all the different steps involved in building a shed. The materials list is detailed out so that every part of the shed has a label which makes it easier to put each part where it goes. Let us know how your shed building project goes, we love to hear about and see photos of our customers building their sheds! Find the email address at the top of this page to send in your shed building photos.
How big should a garden shed be so it can be practical without occupying more space than it has to? Well…it depends. I think this cute little garden shed from acultivatednest has one of the smallest possible footprints. The fact that it’s small but tall allows it to be quite practical. It’s great for the storage of garden tools and there’s even some room for a shelf or two or for a few hooks on the walls.
Make a template on the shed floor for assembling the trusses. Begin by laying out the parts for one truss. Align the bottom chord with the edge of the plywood floor. Then cut four 24-in.-long 2 x 4s. Lay two alongside each rafter and screw them to the plywood floor. Now use these short boards as stopblocks for laying out and assembling each truss. Fasten plywood gussets to each side of every truss with carpenter's glue and 1-in. roofing nails and set the trusses aside.
A shed could double as a greenhouse, in which case you can use the shed plans provided on instructables. In this particular case, the shed was built out of old windows. An old window isn’t exactly something you can repurpose easily but here it’s a perfect fit. The first step is to gather enough windows. After that, it’s time to build the frame and you’ll need some wood for this part. Make sure the foundation is secure before you screw in the windows.
• Improper geographical placement — this is one of the huge mistakes one may make while shed building. It may be too close to your house hence obstructing your beautiful view from your living room or your kitchen as you are cooking. The last thing one would want is not like your house because of a simple thing as a view, so be careful with where you place your shed. One may also build the shed too far away from their house which again is an inconvenience. Who would want to walk from your house to your shed to get some tool you need and you have to trek some long distance? You may also need your shed someplace you can see due to the security reasons. You would want some stupid thief taking your stuff without you see them, would you? Or walking down a snowy lane during a chilly night just so you could get something from your shed. Before building your shed consider all the factors whether positive or negative and then come up with the place in your compound with the most advantages compared to disadvantages.
If you don’t plan to have electricity running through your shed, this is the shed building tip you will want to listen to most. Windows easily brighten up a shed so you don’t have to hunt around for a flashlight or a lantern if you’re old school, every time you need to grab something from your shed. But…don’t go nuts and install a ton of windows or you will be giving up valuable space to hang tools or shelves.
Before a hammer hits a nail: plan, plan, and plan some more. All too often people visit local home centers to get shed ideas. They go inside the prebuilt sheds in the parking lot and decide their own storage needs right then and there. Even worse, they'll grab a few brochures and use those ideas to find a shed design online without doing any proper space planning.
×