Often referred to as the ebook expert, Bob Burnham's reviews are easily reachable everywhere – blogs, online publications and magazines. He was featured in prestigious publications and he even gained a few rewards for his own ebooks. While constantly releasing new work, his main focus is on unbiased reviews of modern ebooks while pursuing his career as a literature professor. Over the past years, his name was linked with a plethora of bestsellers that were successfully reviewed over the Internet. more
Our free shed plans offer a solid introduction to shed construction and building technique, and they include a full materials list to help get you started. The instructions provided are basic, but if you have existing experience with construction, then they may well suffice to help you build your shed without having to spend money. Our premium shed plans are on another level, however. They include detailed, step-by-step instructions and they walk you through the entire shed building process. We also include professional-grade tips on select pages to help you as best we can – it’s like having an expert right next to you every step of the way. All the techniques you will learn from reading our premium shed plans are transferrable too, and they can help even the most seasoned builders perfect their skills. Therefore, we recommend premium shed plans to anybody who is serious about building their own shed, with our free shed plans best-suited as a taster for those interested. Hopefully, you’ve now understood that here at 3DSHEDPLANS™ we do not promote or employ any marketing gimmicks. Download our FREE shed plans and see it for yourself. Don't forget to SUBSCRIBE to our newsletter to get special deals, offers and discounts!
A saltbox shed is defined by its double sloping roof style. The front roof has a steep slope of 12/12, and the rear roof has a lower slope of 5/12. Most plans have options for the doors on either the front or side. Click on the images to view more details. The saltbox style evolved from the practice of extending the second floor roof line down to the first floor level to create additional covered living space. The design adds a south eastern flair to back yard shed designs.
Nail plywood sheeting to the joists to form the floor. If necessary, use H-clips in addition to nailing the sheets into place; these fit between two pieces of plywood and lock them together for additional structural strength. In the example design, two standard sheets of 4- by 8-foot plywood are used whole and a third is sawn in half and used to fill in the 4-foot difference on either end. Because of the spacing of the piers, support beams, and joists, no additional cuts or adjustments are necessary. Note that the pieces of plywood are intentionally misaligned so that the floor doesn’t have a single seam running across the whole thing, which would be a significant structural weakness.

Whether you build your own trusses or order them from the lumberyard, building a roof with trusses is much easier than framing a roof one rafter at a time. As a general rule when learning how to build a shed roof, you’ll need one truss every 2 ft. If you build your own, the cost will be about half this amount. Connect the framing for site-built trusses with plywood gussets glued and screwed to the joints.
The last thing you want is to build a shed only to discover that it’s too small to hold your stuff, handle your hobby, or otherwise meet your needs. By the same token, you don’t want a shed that’s so large it overwhelms your property and looks ungainly behind your house. Choosing the wrong size shed is a common homeowner error, but LP Outdoor Building Solutions’ handy tool helps you get it just right. Check it out, and you’ll see that size does matter!
This shed featured on houzz is inspiring in many different ways. First, check out the design. Isn’t it charming how all the different types of wood and all the different colors complement each other? What a wonderful way to use reclaimed wood pieces…Another detail that has to do with the design is the fact that this shed has clerestory windows. It’s not usually common for shed to have windows of any kind but, when you think about, it’s a pretty practical feature.
Our wood greenhouse shed plans have lots of windows and use clear polycarbonate roofing that lets in plenty of light to keep your plants happy and green. Several designs use the same doors that are installed on residential homes to keep construction simple and allow the door to have a glass panel to let in even more sunlight. The floors are made using 2x6 pressure treated wood so plants can be watered inside without the worry of damaging the floor.
I have spent a truckload of time on the same for five years by purchasing and reading Woodworking books, going through woodworking plan blueprints and understanding woodworking designs. While some of them are very detailed most of them left with questions more than answers because of the incompetency and inadequacy in the design details. I haven’t come across a single plan that had everything I needed, forget the step by step instructions.

There are a lot of plans and designs to choose from when building the shed, so make sure you take a look over several alternatives before starting the actual construction. Invest in weather-resistant lumber (pressure-treated lumber), making sure all the components are in a good condition and perfectly straight. Drill pilot holes before inserting the screws, to prevent the wood from splitting.
So it's not surprising that people often ask me for advice about putting together a backyard storage building. Sometimes I get asked questions that I couldn't possibly answer: "Do you think my husband and brother-in-law can build me a garden shed?" Or, "Would an 8 x 10-ft. shed be big enough to store all my stuff?" Gee, ma'am, I couldn't say. But often, the questions have something to do with shed design, framing or siding options. There, I can help. And so with these inquisitive souls in mind I present my favorite tricks of the shed trade.

When people talk about the different types of shed available, what they should describe are the different types of roof available, since sheds only really differ by the type of roof they have. We provide shed plans for three types of roof: Gable, Lean-To and Hip. Gable, Lean-To and Hip roofs each have their pros and cons. Gable roofs are the most common since they are simple to build and offer plenty of space. Lean-To sheds are popular too for confined spaces. Hip roof sheds are the most complex to build, but they are arguably the most desirable too since they have a more uniform appearance. In terms of shed size, you should choose one that fills the space you have in your yard but you should also consider the overhang for the roof. A 16X24 shed is big enough for vehicle storage and to be used as a workshop, while a 12X16 shed is perfect for storing all your yard tools and mechanical equipment. Sheds smaller than this are fine for basic storage. Gable, Lean-To and Hip roofs each have their pros and cons. Gable roofs are the most common since they are simple to build and offer plenty of space. Lean-to sheds are popular too for confined spaces. Hip roof sheds are the most complex to build, but they are arguably the most desirable too since they have a more uniform appearance. In terms of shed size, you should choose one that fills the space you have in your yard but you should also consider the overhang for the roof. A 16X24 shed is big enough for vehicle storage and to be used as a workshop, while a 12X16 shed is perfect for storing all your yard tools and mechanical equipment. Sheds smaller than this are fine for basic storage. Gable, Lean-To and Hip roofs each have their pros and cons. Gable roofs are the most common since they are simple to build and offer plenty of space. Lean-To sheds are popular too for confined spaces. Hip roof sheds are the most complex to build, but they are arguably the most desirable too since they have a more uniform appearance. In terms of shed size, you should choose one that fills the space you have in your yard but you should also consider the overhang for the roof. A 16X24 shed is big enough for vehicle storage and to be used as a workshop, while a 12X16 shed is perfect for storing all your yard tools and mechanical equipment. Sheds smaller than this are fine for basic storage.
Our Free shed plans are aimed more at giving you an idea of what to expect with from the premium plan. For the advanced DIYer, the basic free plans may even be enough to build the full shed. But if you’re a beginner the basic free plan will only act as a guide. In order to get the full step-by-step instructions you would need to invest in one of our premium plans.

Often referred to as the ebook expert, Bob Burnham's reviews are easily reachable everywhere – blogs, online publications and magazines. He was featured in prestigious publications and he even gained a few rewards for his own ebooks. While constantly releasing new work, his main focus is on unbiased reviews of modern ebooks while pursuing his career as a literature professor. Over the past years, his name was linked with a plethora of bestsellers that were successfully reviewed over the Internet. more
A thing you might want to check is if regulations require a minimum setback from the property line. This is often overlooked and come back to bite you. A silly thing I found out when I built my shed, my jurisdiction in California treats buildings differently depending on what they are called on the permit. I called my shed a barn because I built a gambrel roof and it looked like a barn. My surprise....A barn must be 50 feet away from any structures occupied by humans. A shed can be almost against the house.....same size, same shape,,,just different names.
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