A saltbox shed is defined by its double sloping roof style. The front roof has a steep slope of 12/12, and the rear roof has a lower slope of 5/12. Most plans have options for the doors on either the front or side. Click on the images to view more details. The saltbox style evolved from the practice of extending the second floor roof line down to the first floor level to create additional covered living space. The design adds a south eastern flair to back yard shed designs.
The advertising was incredibly misleading. The early indications (at least via ********) are that you can purchase downloadable shed plans. Further claims are made that **** ********* is offering something unique in the detail and instruction, such that someone with no building experience could purchase material, fabricate, and build these sheds. First, that is not at all the case. most of these "plans" are only one-page shots. Second, most of the plans couldn't be build even by someone who is in construction or familiar with building. This stops just short of being a SCAM. At the very least, it's extremely misleading. **** ********* should be ashamed of himself.

Ryan had a difficult time building his own first shed. Wrong material, wrong measures, wrong techniques, all of them didn’t help in making the shed any quicker. It took him 6 months to complete his first shed project, and at the end of it he was worn out and exhausted. Even after spending a lot of time reading and purchasing woodworking books, blueprints, nothing seemed to work. Most of the shed plans he bought lacked vital information which left him with more questions than answers. That is when he decided to leave it all aside and build his own shed plans. That was the beginning of his work towards building his master collection of shed plans.
Cut the sill piece and assemble the windows with pocket screws. Using a router with a 3/8-in. rabbet bit, rout a 3/8-in.-deep recess on the back of the window to receive the 1/4-in. Plexiglas acrylic sheet (Photo 14). Set the window frame, recessed side down, over a piece of acrylic sheet and trace the shape with a permanent marker. Cut the curve with a fine-tooth jigsaw blade and the straight sections with a fine-tooth blade in a table saw or circular saw.
You can cut steel roofing panels with a circular saw and a carbide blade, but it’ll save you a lot of work if you order the panels the right length to start with. Plus, you’ll have a greater color selection if you order the roofing rather than buy off-the-shelf panels. Remember to order in advance, though, since it usually takes several weeks for the roofing to arrive. And make sure the overhangs are the right size so the panels will overhang the fascia slightly.
Please note that fully assembled buildings and storage shed kits are the same price. This is due to the fact that storage shed kits from Sheds Unlimited are typically assembled in the manufacturing facility. The walls are temporarily put together as though the building was to be delivered as a unit. This allows us to be sure that the parts are properly assembled and also allows us to paint the garden shed kit. Since the DIY shed kit is painted in our facility, it should only need some touch up paint after it is assembled on your property.

Most of the Amish Built Sheds Unlimited storage sheds can be custom ordered as a DIY STORAGE SHED KIT PACKAGE for assembly on-site. If for any reason installing a completed storage building into the backyard is not an option or if you are simply a handyman at heart and would like to try your own skills, then a Economy Shed Kit, Vinyl Sided Storage Shed Kit, Classic Amish Sheds Kit or a Premier Garden Storage Shed Kit might work perfectly for you.


Our wood greenhouse shed plans have lots of windows and use clear polycarbonate roofing that lets in plenty of light to keep your plants happy and green. Several designs use the same doors that are installed on residential homes to keep construction simple and allow the door to have a glass panel to let in even more sunlight. The floors are made using 2x6 pressure treated wood so plants can be watered inside without the worry of damaging the floor.
Build the framework for the side walls. The bottom plate of each side wall should be the same length as the distance between the bottom plates of the front and back wall (so that the side walls will fit between them). The standard spacing between vertical wall studs in the US is 16 inches (from center to center, not from edge to edge); since this stud spacing doesn’t perfectly divide into the total length of the side walls in the example design, the two outermost studs make up for this discrepancy by being slightly closer to their neighbors. Most importantly, the top plate is angled so that the roof will be sloped, which makes the height of each vertical stud slightly different. If you’re not sure how to calculate the necessary height of each vertical stud in advance, make the two outermost vertical studs first, lay them the correct distance apart, cut a top plate that spans this distance, and then cut each remaining vertical stud individually based on the distance between the top and bottom plates at that exact location.[8]
Ryan Henderson is a master woodworker with over 30 years experience and has developed Ryan’s Shed Plans.  This is a detailed digital book with 12,000 shed plans available for instant download with many different bonus offers.  The plans are detailed because they are written by a master woodworker.  He has taught many newbie woodworkers over the past 30 years how to build sheds and other woodworking projects.  He is skilled in the art of woodworking and put together a nice, large set of plans.  The plans are easy to read with step-by-step instructions.

There are plenty of jobs to do out in the yard, and most of these tasks require tools and machines like weedwhackers, lawn mowers, edgers, and everything else. The garage can only hold so much, because it’s meant to store your car or cars. Heaven knows you aren’t going to be storing that equipment inside the house once you’re through with it, so an outdoor shed is necessary in every home’s backyard. It can cost a fortune to hire a woodworker or carpenter to customize an outdoor storage space for you. And if you take it upon yourself to build a shed, you’ll probably be left with nothing but frustration and problems.
By searching online you can find some free shed plans that are decent. Most often though these plans will be geared towards more experienced builders and they will not be very detailed. If you are a first time builder look for plans you can understand, even if it means paying a little. Use plans that contain a material list and plenty of details if this is your first time. Most free plans available are not as detailed with the building steps, so free is not always a good idea. If you go to the top of this page I have provided a list of some of the best plans from reputable websites.
We now need to create a base that we can nail the frames for the walls into.  We did this with four 2x8's and some bent i-bolts along with a lot of mortar.  The basic process was that we bent the bottoms of the i-bolts after heating them with a blow torch, and then anchored these in some of the holes in the cinderblocks with a lot of mortar.  Then we drilled holes in the 2x8's where the i-bolts were and put these on top and screwed them in.  The frames can now be solidly attached to the base with the framing hammer.
Build the framework for all four walls. To account for the fact that the front and back walls are different from each other (due to the doorframe in the front) and the side walls must both be sloped (to prevent rain from collecting on the roof), each of these will have to be tackled somewhat differently. It’s easiest to construct the back first, the front second, and the two sides last, as shown in the numbered image below. See How to Frame a Wall for more information before you read the instructions below.[5]

how to build a shed

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