Proceeding with your shed requires smart planning. For starters, you may need a permit from your local zoning authority and/or homeowners’ association to build a new structure on your property; check with the proper authorities before you even invest in the materials. Plus, there may be rules that dictate how you may use your shed, or whether you’re allowed to wire it for electricity. Once you get the go-ahead to build, you’ll want reliable guidelines. For anyone inclined to DIY rather than buy a prebuilt shed, look over a selection of free LP Outdoor Building Solutions plans based on your choice of size and roof style. Each set of plans comes with extensive material and hardware lists, detailed construction information, and tried-and-true building tips.
Pasadena, California, is known for its Craftsman style homes, a great number of which have been carefully preserved and restored. Owned by a University of Southern California (USC)-educated architect, Nott & Associates specializes in the Craftsman style. For a backyard shed, Nott custom designed and constructed the wooden doors, which include period-perfect details and hardware.
Hello Instructables!  This is my entry into the Shopbot Contest.  This Instructable will show you the steps to building your own shed.   We decided that our shed would be for storage because we wanted to get some stuff out of the garage so we can use it as a shop.  One of the challenges of building a shed in our backyard was that the ground was sloped in the area that we wanted to put it, so we had to find a way to get around that.  Another was that we are building beside some well established trees, and we didn't want to harm their root structure.  This is why we went with cinderblock and mortar rather than poured concrete.
Building something yourself, especially something as big as a shed, is always rewarding, but not only will it feel good to have a self-made beauty in your backyard, it’s times lower in cost than buying a shed. In fact, building a small shed can cost as little as $100! That’s a pennysaver! And well, all proper DIY wood projects should be, ain’t that right?

Build the framework for all four walls. To account for the fact that the front and back walls are different from each other (due to the doorframe in the front) and the side walls must both be sloped (to prevent rain from collecting on the roof), each of these will have to be tackled somewhat differently. It’s easiest to construct the back first, the front second, and the two sides last, as shown in the numbered image below. See How to Frame a Wall for more information before you read the instructions below.[5]

how to build a shed

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