How big should a garden shed be so it can be practical without occupying more space than it has to? Well…it depends. I think this cute little garden shed from acultivatednest has one of the smallest possible footprints. The fact that it’s small but tall allows it to be quite practical. It’s great for the storage of garden tools and there’s even some room for a shelf or two or for a few hooks on the walls.

The advertising was incredibly misleading. The early indications (at least via ********) are that you can purchase downloadable shed plans. Further claims are made that **** ********* is offering something unique in the detail and instruction, such that someone with no building experience could purchase material, fabricate, and build these sheds. First, that is not at all the case. most of these "plans" are only one-page shots. Second, most of the plans couldn't be build even by someone who is in construction or familiar with building. This stops just short of being a SCAM. At the very least, it's extremely misleading. **** ********* should be ashamed of himself.
Each truss is made up of two 2 x 4 rafters and one 2 x 4 ceiling joist. The three boards are joined together with 1/2-in. plywood gussets. To speed up the assembly process, build all the trusses on the shed floor before erecting the walls. Start by cutting all the rafters to length with a 40° angle at one end of each. Cut 2 x 4s to 10 ft. long for the bottom chords of the trusses. Also, cut all of the plywood gussets.
For example, the last three sheds I built were trimmed with white PVC trim boards instead of painted cedar 1 x 4s. This new plastic lumber, which I used for the rake, fascia, frieze and corner boards, is impervious to bugs, warping, splitting or decay, and it never needs painting. Other low-maintenance options include: vinyl or aluminum windows, faux-slate roof shingles, fiberglass or steel doors, composite decking for steps, and fiber-cement siding. (I don't usually recommend aluminum or vinyl siding for sheds; neither material is rugged enough to survive the inevitable beating outbuildings take.)

I felt that this is a very poorly setup web site. I purchased the Ryan’s shed plans online, did not receive an emailed receipt or link to the web site that worked. Phoned Clikbank and they promised to send another receipt. They did not. I had saved the original online confirmation with the links to the site. When I clicked on these it said the files couldn’t be found.
For the shed's floor deck, use ¾-in. exterior-grade plywood; anything thinner will flex between joists. (Note that a double layer of ½-in. exterior ply is okay, too.) If you plan to store heavy items, such as a lawn tractor or woodworking machines, consider using ¾-in. tongue-and-groove plywood. This costs slightly more, and is a bit more troublesome to install, but its edges lock tightly together, creating a rock-solid, rigid floor. In areas with excessively high moisture and large numbers of wood-boring bugs--such as Florida, Alabama and the other Gulf Coast states--consider using pressure-treated plywood for the floor deck. It's particularly resistant to moisture and insects.

Step 4 – Time to finally pour the concrete floor. This requires another trip to Home Depot. The kids are getting tired of this project and at this point, I don’t think they really care about how to build a shed, but would rather take a nap. Layla did kick butt at her morning JuJitsu tournament and won third place for her age group. If you are feeling tired like Layla and overwhelmed you can always get some help with you DIY shed project. Click here for assistance: HELP
Working from ladders is more dangerous than working from scaffolding. Plus, having to constantly move ladders around is time consuming. When you get to the roof construction, consider renting a set of scaffolding with wheels. You’ll be amazed at how much easier it is to have a stable platform to work from and to set your tools and materials on. You can rent a 5-ft.-tall section of scaffold with three planks and wheels for about $110 per week.

DIY Shed Plans

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