There are a number of considerations when it comes to choosing an outdoor storage shed for your home. There’s the question of price, design, climate, size, and more. To begin with, realize that you get what you pay for with a storage shed. Saving a few hundred bucks on the cheapest model might not make the most sense in the long-term. This means that you’re passing on quality siding materials like cedar and vinyl. Next, think about how you want the shed to look in your yard. We’ve all seen those classic storage sheds that are designed to have the same aesthetics of your home. For instance, rustic designs for a country-style home. These complementing designs can be quite charming, and allows the shed to stand out as an addition of your home. Another option is to have your shed bleed into the landscape by covering it with plants or by planting perennial beds around the unit.
The advertising was incredibly misleading. The early indications (at least via ********) are that you can purchase downloadable shed plans. Further claims are made that **** ********* is offering something unique in the detail and instruction, such that someone with no building experience could purchase material, fabricate, and build these sheds. First, that is not at all the case. most of these "plans" are only one-page shots. Second, most of the plans couldn't be build even by someone who is in construction or familiar with building. This stops just short of being a SCAM. At the very least, it's extremely misleading. **** ********* should be ashamed of himself.
Because the shed is designed to abut to another structure, the foundation need only be pressure-treated skids, the roof pitched in only one direction to shed water, and the back wall sheathed with 1/2-inch CDX plywood, which withstands indirect exposure to moisture. See Anatomy of an Outdoor Shed or Playhouse for more about typical shed construction.
Since outdoor space is limited in a big city, everyone knows you must make smart use of vertical real estate. For a greenhouse/shed in San Francisco's Bernal Heights, Step 3 Studio designed in an open-framework structure that provides shelter for a garden shed that stores potting materials and plants on the ground floor. A steel staircase was built on site, which leads to a second level surfaced in steel grid mesh. The higher elevation is the perfect spot for container plants that require more sun. It's also a nice place to hang out and enjoy views of the city, day or night.
Cut the treated 6x6s to 12 ft. and set them on the gravel so they’re parallel and the outside edges are 6 ft. apart. On sloped ground, you’ll have to raise the 6×6 on the low side until it’s level with the adjacent 6×6. Do this by stacking treated 2x6s, 4x6s or 6x6s on top of the treated 6×6 to reach the right height. Use a 4-ft. or longer level to make sure the 6x6s are level and level with each other. Finally, square the 6x6s by adjusting the position of one 6×6. Slide the 6×6 back and forth, not sideways, until the diagonal measurements from opposite corners are equal. Build the platform with treated 2x6s, 24 in. on center, and cover it with treated 3/4-in. plywood (Figure B).
I don't waste my time on free plans, store-bought sheds, or ready-made, mail order kit solutions... been there, done that. Free means lack of user feedback and you get absolutely no customer support. With store-bought and ready-made mail order sheds: they're flimsy, profit-driven solutions that I've always had to tear apart and modify too much to get the storage space to work or to match the character and style of the home.
My Shed Plans by Ryan Henderson is not just your run-of-the-mill collection of a few hundred shed plans, but it is a collection of whopping 12,000 shed plans. Yes! You heard it right. And each one of them is accompanied with detailed, step by step instructions and diagrams, tool and material list ensuring that nothing goes wrong when you start with one.
When choosing where to build your shed, choose a flat dry spot on your property. This will make it easier to excavate and level it out, and ensure that you build on a dry surface. Avoid building your shed in a low lying area that is prone to water collection or you’ll find your shed flooded after a big rain. Too much water means rotting wood, blistering paint and rusty hinges and none of that will highlight how hard you worked to build this shed.
Door placement is also important. You often see doors placed on the gable end of the building, which looks nice, but makes it virtually impossible to reach items stored at the rear of the shed. A better alternative is to put the door on the long side wall, so that you'll be able to access items to the right, left and back. Another option is to install doors on both gable-end walls, so that you'll be able to easily reach items from either end of the shed.
Thanks for sharing such detailed plans Seamster. I'm hoping to build a very small lean-to tool shed (2.5X4.5' base) for my very small yard and this has given me a lot of insight. Currently, theor the table and mitre saws I inherited are stored in our spare bedroom... eventual nursery room. I want to get them into their own space outdoors sooner than later. Here in North Carolina with the humid summers I think it would be best to add some housewrap to the walls to help protect the tools. I also have a situation where the back wall will only be 4-6" off the house so need to construct/panel my walls before erecting them. Do you know if it's reasonable to panel then wrap each wall frame, side it and then finally erect and fasten? Would be very grateful for your thoughts!
Before a hammer hits a nail: plan, plan, and plan some more. All too often people visit local home centers to get shed ideas. They go inside the prebuilt sheds in the parking lot and decide their own storage needs right then and there. Even worse, they'll grab a few brochures and use those ideas to find a shed design online without doing any proper space planning.
Do not make the mistake of not building your own shed because you have never done it before. With the right shed plans you will get the same results the experts get. Begin by choosing plans you feel comfortable with and know you can follow along. Simply follow the steps provided, measure correctly, and in no time you will construct your own shed. Study the building guide to get familiar with all the steps and to get to know the names of all the parts.
This step by step diy woodworking project is about diy shed plans. If you want to learn more about how to build a shed in your backyard, we recommend you to pay attention to the instructions described in the article. Work with attention and invest in high quality materials, as to use the shed for many years in a row. Plan everything from the very beginning, including the building permit that is required in some cases.
Don Vandervort has developed his expertise for more than 30 years, as Building Editor for Sunset Books, Senior Editor at Home Magazine, author of more than 30 home improvement books, and writer of countless magazine articles. He appeared for 3 seasons on HGTV’s “The Fix,” and served as MSN’s home expert for several years. Don founded HomeTips in 1996.
The framing is the most important part of the above-ground structure because it stiffens up the plywood boards and supports the roof.  You will need a lot of 2x4's, and a way to attach them.  We used this as an excuse to buy some new air hammers from canadian tire.  We were able to get the lumber for the entire project delivered by a company called Tamrack Lumber.  They brought out a truck and dropped off all the supplies.  For the roofing you will need little plates with groups of nails sticking out of them which I believe are called joist plates.  These are used on the angles to keep them from shifting.  The last thing you will need is a way to cut all of the 2x4's.  To do this we borrowed a very nice miter saw from a friend for a few days.  It is much easier if the cutting tool can cut on angles, otherwise you will be left to improvise when cutting the peices for the roof.

I got suckered into the 12k shed plans, only to find myself falling for one of the oldest scammer sales pitches in the book by being up-sold into the add-ons. Before I clicked I did a quick review and the first few sites that popped up had said that it was worth the money to buy the add-on because that is where the real value was (perhaps a review page planted by the good folks of MyShedPlans).


Now you have finished your shed!  Once your doors are on, you can add latches and locks.  The windows on our shed are made of 1/4 inch thick plexiglass held in with white silicone to match the trim.  The floor was finished with concrete tiles. You can now choose to leave the inside of your shed barren, to say, store a few larger items, or you can add shelves like we did.  We added the shelves because we had a lot of small boxes and things that we wanted to move out of the garage.  They are made from 7/16 inch thick oriented strand board and 2x2s.  The shelves in the middle have some spare 6x6 chunks keeping them up, which is suitable because they are the deepest and are designed to hold the heaviest items.  They are so strong that you can climb on them, even jump on them!  We also added a bike rack on the right hand side that can hold our five bikes.  The finishing touch on the shed was to add an electrical outlet and a flourescent lighting fixture with a switch.  There is a vent in the back wall for warm summer days but it is probably unneccesary.  Hopefully you can build your own storage shed and de-cluterize your life as well.  Thanks!

A lean to shed is the perfect way to build up against a fence or wall and still have plenty of room in your yard. It also keeps water away from the structure you are building up against. The lean to shed design is the simplest design of shed to build because of its single plane sloping roof which makes the roof easy to build. We have many different configurations and sizes either with double or single doors. The larger lean to designs include optional plans to build the doors on any side of the shed. Our smaller lean to style sheds have a 4 in 12 pitch roof and our larger designs have a 2 in 12 pitch roof to keep the overall shed height lower and help reduce shed construction costs.
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