The trick for learning how to build a storage shed is to stretch the line across a scrap of wood at each end so there’s a space between the line and the part you’re straightening. On a wall, for example, tack small scraps of 1/2-in. plywood at each end of the top plate and stretch a line very tightly over the plywood. Then use a third scrap as a gauge to check the distance between the line and the lumber. Use braces or whatever is needed to adjust the top plate until the gauge just fits. Now your top plate will be perfectly straight.
Door placement is also important. You often see doors placed on the gable end of the building, which looks nice, but makes it virtually impossible to reach items stored at the rear of the shed. A better alternative is to put the door on the long side wall, so that you'll be able to access items to the right, left and back. Another option is to install doors on both gable-end walls, so that you'll be able to easily reach items from either end of the shed.

Once redirected to the webpage, I found a bewildering list of links, and downloads. Some were redundant, some didn't work. And I kept trying to figure out where the 12k plans were. I thought for what I paid I should be able to plug in my parameters into a query and get something that remotely looked like an organized list of plans that matched my query. But nada. Nothing. Zilch. Just piles of pdf's tucked seemingly haphazardly into folders here and there, listed in not too logical order in links on a webpage.
3 The frame of the roof consists of four 2-by-4 rafters cut so that they rest on the front- and rear-wall top plates, as shown in the rafter detail at right. Install a gable stud directly over the center studs on both side walls to fit between the end rafter and the top plate. Install the sub-fascia and then the fascia to the front ends of the rafters.
I got suckered into the 12k shed plans, only to find myself falling for one of the oldest scammer sales pitches in the book by being up-sold into the add-ons. Before I clicked I did a quick review and the first few sites that popped up had said that it was worth the money to buy the add-on because that is where the real value was (perhaps a review page planted by the good folks of MyShedPlans).
If you're excited to start browsing Ryan's shed designs, you're right where I was shortly after finding Ryan Shed Plans. If you can dedicate some time to putting your own shed together and don't mind purchasing the materials from a local store or ordering them online as needed, you will appreciate the thorough instructions provided with each of Ryan's plans. There are so many options that you should have no problem finding a design that fits your needs, and you will have tons of inspiration to fuel future projects as well.
I don't waste my time on free plans, store-bought sheds, or ready-made, mail order kit solutions... been there, done that. Free means lack of user feedback and you get absolutely no customer support. With store-bought and ready-made mail order sheds: they're flimsy, profit-driven solutions that I've always had to tear apart and modify too much to get the storage space to work or to match the character and style of the home.

A lean to shed is the perfect way to build up against a fence or wall and still have plenty of room in your yard. It also keeps water away from the structure you are building up against. The lean to shed design is the simplest design of shed to build because of its single plane sloping roof which makes the roof easy to build. We have many different configurations and sizes either with double or single doors. The larger lean to designs include optional plans to build the doors on any side of the shed. Our smaller lean to style sheds have a 4 in 12 pitch roof and our larger designs have a 2 in 12 pitch roof to keep the overall shed height lower and help reduce shed construction costs.

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