Wooden sheds have a characteristic look that can mix in well with the environment In spite of the quality of wood, after some time, untreated and ignored wood can decay, split, twist or wind up noticeably powerless to form and mould, so wood sheds ought to be dealt with for insurance with stain and varnish. Wood sheds require regular support. This incorporates keeping plant matter, flotsam and jetsam from heaping up adjacent to the dividers and on the rooftop, and infrequent decay sealing with the additive.
Ryan had a difficult time building his own first shed. Wrong material, wrong measures, wrong techniques, all of them didn’t help in making the shed any quicker. It took him 6 months to complete his first shed project, and at the end of it he was worn out and exhausted. Even after spending a lot of time reading and purchasing woodworking books, blueprints, nothing seemed to work. Most of the shed plans he bought lacked vital information which left him with more questions than answers. That is when he decided to leave it all aside and build his own shed plans. That was the beginning of his work towards building his master collection of shed plans.

My Shed Plans just might be every do-it-yourself junkie’s dream product. Ryan Henderson, the creator of My Shed Plans, has been building one-of-a-kind outdoor sheds for more than 20 years. If you believe his story, he has unselfishly decided to share his love of woodworking and carpentry through his guides which will enable the everyman who does not have handyman experience to build their very own outdoor shed. Can it be true?
Here we have officially published over 40 FREE garden & storage shed plans, that are suitable for experienced DIY'er. Whether you are looking for a big or small, modern or classy looking shed - we have all of them available for YOU and that too for FREE! In case you want to GO PREMIUM & SAVE BIG: subscribe to our newsletter now and get instant 30% OFF discount code for purchases in our store.
I don't waste my time on free plans, store-bought sheds, or ready-made, mail order kit solutions... been there, done that. Free means lack of user feedback and you get absolutely no customer support. With store-bought and ready-made mail order sheds: they're flimsy, profit-driven solutions that I've always had to tear apart and modify too much to get the storage space to work or to match the character and style of the home.
Are you looking forward to building a storage shed? Well, there are quite many factors that one has to consider before you sit for this DIY project like the design, materials, price, and size. Most of us usually get attracted to the lowest prices given that they come at very low costs, ignoring the alternatives. But these plans here can be constructed with Cedar and Vinyl will cost you around few hundred dollars even when built with low-quality materials. That being said, most of the blueprints in Ryan Shed Plans Blueprints are exclusively designed as storage sheds and you can choose any of them to make things easy for you.​
Ø Clay tiled sheds — as the name suggests, these are sheds that their roofs consist of clay tiles. The clay tiles make the wooden sheds look visually appealing. Nevertheless, one has to plan for the clay tiles from the foundation of the shed so that it can support the roof due to the bulkiness of the roof. The wooden walls need to be strong enough to support the roof. It would be advisable to hire an expert to install the clay tiled roof to avoid complications.
This shed, one of our most popular outdoor storage sheds ever, features some unique details that make it look more expensive than it really was to build. Arch-top windows and a custom door give this shed a high-quality look that belies its low cost and simple construction. The panelized construction technique means you could build the parts in your garage on a rainy weekend and then haul them to the site for assembly. Modest finishes like OSB siding and composite trim and fiberglass shingles help keep the materials cost low. And you’ll save hundreds of dollars by providing your own labor to build the door and windows for some cheap outdoor storage. The modular construction and wood platform foundation mean you can construct this shed almost anywhere, even on remote or sloping sites. In this article, we’ll show you the basics of how to build the shed and install the windows and doors.
My advice... Don't do-it-all-yourself. Novice and pro alike can benefit from each other in DIY. You might have the shed location leveled by a landscaper; get a referral to outsource the shed's foundation to a building subcontractor; you can even have the roof's trusses made by a local truss company and the shingles installed by a handyman or roofer.
From start to finish, it may seem a little intimidating, but just take it one step at a time. The nice thing about building a shed is that it starts off easy (layout the foundation, building the floor, etc.), and by the time you get to some of the more daunting tasks (like the roof), you would have gained a lot of confidence/experience working your way to that point.
Before we can finish the base we need to get the electrical ready.  Put a peice of conduit over your electrical wire to protect it from any damage it could receive while you are finishing the base and to give the shed a more finished look.  Make sure the pipe and wire inside are pointing up perpendicular to the ground and are preferably going straight to the location where your first outlet will be.

Once redirected to the webpage, I found a bewildering list of links, and downloads. Some were redundant, some didn't work. And I kept trying to figure out where the 12k plans were. I thought for what I paid I should be able to plug in my parameters into a query and get something that remotely looked like an organized list of plans that matched my query. But nada. Nothing. Zilch. Just piles of pdf's tucked seemingly haphazardly into folders here and there, listed in not too logical order in links on a webpage.
Door placement is also important. You often see doors placed on the gable end of the building, which looks nice, but makes it virtually impossible to reach items stored at the rear of the shed. A better alternative is to put the door on the long side wall, so that you'll be able to access items to the right, left and back. Another option is to install doors on both gable-end walls, so that you'll be able to easily reach items from either end of the shed.
When you open them on the computer, you have to fill them up and make them organized as the PDFs and Ebooks are either in not very compatible format like you have to rotate them the right way every single time. The product is not exactly disappointing on a whole, but with so many blueprints it is tough to find which one is good and which one is not as you have to go through all of them to decide that.​

Copyright © 2019. All Rights Reserved. 3DSHEDPLANS™ is officially registered and protected trademark in the United States. Owned & operated by Netholics Media, LLC. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without the prior written permission of the publisher, except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical reviews and certain other noncommercial uses permitted by copyright law. For permission or any other requests, please get in touch with us using the contact form provided. Use of this website constitutes acceptance of the 3DSHEDPLANS.COM’s User Terms and Privacy policy.
Ø Large sheds — they are larger in size compared to the other type of sheds we have mentioned above. They have enough space that one can accommodate outdoor tools and still carry out activities. They can be used as offices. However, if used as an office, one will have to be careful while carrying out their activities to avoid substances that may hurt or prick them as they are moving around.
We built the Colonial-style garden shed shown here from a set of mail-order building plans. The 10 x 16-ft. outbuilding has easy-to-install plywood siding, three large windows and two pairs of doors. The entire building could be used for storage, but we decided to divide the interior space into two separate areas: a 4 x 10-ft. tool-storage area and a 10 x 12-ft. children's playroom.
Each truss is made up of two 2 x 4 rafters and one 2 x 4 ceiling joist. The three boards are joined together with 1/2-in. plywood gussets. To speed up the assembly process, build all the trusses on the shed floor before erecting the walls. Start by cutting all the rafters to length with a 40° angle at one end of each. Cut 2 x 4s to 10 ft. long for the bottom chords of the trusses. Also, cut all of the plywood gussets.
• Stagnant waters — As much as the wood is coated to protect it from water, it would still be advisable to keep the wood away from stagnant waters. This is as the wood coating is not a permanent coat and so is the wood is exposed to water it will get damaged over time. The best way to avoid water paddles near the shed is building gutter systems on its roof which directs the water to a tank or a pool.
Don’t be tempted to get sloppy when you square up the floor and walls of your shed. An out-of-square start will haunt you through the rest of the project, from doors and windows to trim and roofing. For a concrete slab, measure diagonally across the opposite corners of the form boards. Then adjust the forms until the diagonal measurements are equal. Do the same for a wood platform floor. If you’re installing sheet siding on the walls, before you stand them up, measure diagonally and square up the wall before you nail on the siding.
We found all the materials to build this shed at our local home center. Most of the construction is straightforward and requires only standard carpentry tools and a circular saw. For how to build the shed windows and door, you’ll also need a table saw, power miter saw and router. We used a Kreg pocket hole jig and pocket hole screws to assemble the door and windows. Another really great thing about small storage sheds such as this on, it don’t take as long to build! With a helper or two, you could have the platform and shell built in two or three days. Then expect to spend four or five more days completing the siding, trim, doors, windows and roofing.
For strength, plan to build the front and back layers so the corners overlap each other. Then, to accommodate inset panels, make the front pieces a little wider to create a lip for the panels to rest against. Use plywood or tongue-and-groove boards for the panels, and hold them in with stops nailed on the back. You can assemble the two frames with pocket screws before gluing and screwing them together, but it’s not necessary. After the glue dries, plane or sand the edges to hide the fact that there are two layers.

Omit the bird’s-mouth from four rafters and use these on the ends. Cut the 2x4s for the ridge and subfascia to length and mark the rafter positions on them. Line up the rafters with the marks and nail through the ridge and subfascia with 16d nails to secure them. When the roof frame is complete, line up the subfascia with the chalk line on the platform and tack it in three or four places with toe screws to hold the frame straight while you install the soffit.
Thanks for sharing such detailed plans Seamster. I'm hoping to build a very small lean-to tool shed (2.5X4.5' base) for my very small yard and this has given me a lot of insight. Currently, theor the table and mitre saws I inherited are stored in our spare bedroom... eventual nursery room. I want to get them into their own space outdoors sooner than later. Here in North Carolina with the humid summers I think it would be best to add some housewrap to the walls to help protect the tools. I also have a situation where the back wall will only be 4-6" off the house so need to construct/panel my walls before erecting them. Do you know if it's reasonable to panel then wrap each wall frame, side it and then finally erect and fasten? Would be very grateful for your thoughts!

Because the shed is designed to abut to another structure, the foundation need only be pressure-treated skids, the roof pitched in only one direction to shed water, and the back wall sheathed with 1/2-inch CDX plywood, which withstands indirect exposure to moisture. See Anatomy of an Outdoor Shed or Playhouse for more about typical shed construction.
×