If you plan to paint your shed, natural wood siding isn’t necessary. You can buy sheets of OSB (oriented strand board) siding at a fraction of the cost of real plywood, and it’ll probably last longer too. LP SmartSide panel is one brand. You can buy plain, grooved or stucco-like panels in several thicknesses and sizes. Ask at your local lumberyard to see what’s available.
For a freestanding shed, you can build the shed on top of a concrete slab (see Pouring a Concrete Slab) instead of the pressure-treated skids and floor joists; this will actually result in a sturdier—more permanent— structure. Otherwise, for a freestanding shed, the foundation should be constructed on concrete piers or poured footings (see Pouring Concrete Footings & Piers).  Be aware that building on footings will raise the height of the shed up from the ground.
A tool shed is pretty easy to build. We found this inspiring example on thecavenderdiary which, as you can see, has a pretty straight-forward, traditional look. It has its back on the wall and inside there’s not much worth mentioning, except maybe for those practical storage hooks, shelves and rods on the inside of the doors. Check out the plans for this toolshed and find a way to customize them according to your own storage needs.
Build the framework for the back wall. Make the top and bottom beams (a.k.a. the plates) the same length as the length of the floor which they sit. To keep your measurements simple, make the spacing between the vertical studs identical to the spacing between your floor joists. Note that the back wall should be lower than the front wall so that the roof slopes and directs rain away from the door.[6]

The shed we built rests on a foundation made up of 12 solid-concrete blocks. The 4 x 8 x 16-in. blocks are arranged in three rows spaced 59 in. apart. These blocks are typically set directly on the ground, but we put down a 4-in. bed of gravel first because our site occasionally receives groundwater. The gravel will keep the soil beneath the shed from eroding or becoming soggy.


A tool shed is pretty easy to build. We found this inspiring example on thecavenderdiary which, as you can see, has a pretty straight-forward, traditional look. It has its back on the wall and inside there’s not much worth mentioning, except maybe for those practical storage hooks, shelves and rods on the inside of the doors. Check out the plans for this toolshed and find a way to customize them according to your own storage needs.
We have a large selection of small horse barn plans, tack rooms and run in shed plans. Each of our designs comes with a materials list and construction plans to help you save time and money when you build. We have many different sizes of horse barns including one, two, three and four stalls. Most of the barns and run in sheds are designed to be built with pine board and batten siding on the outside and a 4' tall Oak kick board on the interior.
The walls of the foundation have been created and the electrical is all set, now all that needs to be done is to fill the gaping hole in between them with limestone agrigate.  We also threw in some concrete paving stones that we had lying around because we don't plan on using them and we had already tried to give them away.  After the limestone is in place tamp it down by jumping on it and keep filling up any places that are no longer level.  After the entire base is filled with as much limestone as you can fit put a sprinkler on to soak it and set it for the next hour or so.  You may need to add a bit more limestone after this is done as well.
×