Omit the bird’s-mouth from four rafters and use these on the ends. Cut the 2x4s for the ridge and subfascia to length and mark the rafter positions on them. Line up the rafters with the marks and nail through the ridge and subfascia with 16d nails to secure them. When the roof frame is complete, line up the subfascia with the chalk line on the platform and tack it in three or four places with toe screws to hold the frame straight while you install the soffit.
Listen, about the My Shed Plans Scam… all you can say is haters are gonna hate. There are way too many people on the web going about trying to ruin things for others. It probably makes them feel bigger than the basement of their parents’ house allows. In regards to your My Shed Plans product, it looks like a great deal. 12,000 shed plans, all in one package? Seriously, is there any plan that’s missing?
When people talk about the different types of shed available, what they should describe are the different types of roof available, since sheds only really differ by the type of roof they have. We provide shed plans for three types of roof: Gable, Lean-To and Hip. Gable, Lean-To and Hip roofs each have their pros and cons. Gable roofs are the most common since they are simple to build and offer plenty of space. Lean-To sheds are popular too for confined spaces. Hip roof sheds are the most complex to build, but they are arguably the most desirable too since they have a more uniform appearance. In terms of shed size, you should choose one that fills the space you have in your yard but you should also consider the overhang for the roof. A 16X24 shed is big enough for vehicle storage and to be used as a workshop, while a 12X16 shed is perfect for storing all your yard tools and mechanical equipment. Sheds smaller than this are fine for basic storage. Gable, Lean-To and Hip roofs each have their pros and cons. Gable roofs are the most common since they are simple to build and offer plenty of space. Lean-to sheds are popular too for confined spaces. Hip roof sheds are the most complex to build, but they are arguably the most desirable too since they have a more uniform appearance. In terms of shed size, you should choose one that fills the space you have in your yard but you should also consider the overhang for the roof. A 16X24 shed is big enough for vehicle storage and to be used as a workshop, while a 12X16 shed is perfect for storing all your yard tools and mechanical equipment. Sheds smaller than this are fine for basic storage. Gable, Lean-To and Hip roofs each have their pros and cons. Gable roofs are the most common since they are simple to build and offer plenty of space. Lean-To sheds are popular too for confined spaces. Hip roof sheds are the most complex to build, but they are arguably the most desirable too since they have a more uniform appearance. In terms of shed size, you should choose one that fills the space you have in your yard but you should also consider the overhang for the roof. A 16X24 shed is big enough for vehicle storage and to be used as a workshop, while a 12X16 shed is perfect for storing all your yard tools and mechanical equipment. Sheds smaller than this are fine for basic storage.
It’s vital to build your shed on a stable, level location—and never in a wet, low-lying area or on a downward slope. And no matter how well a shed is constructed, it won’t hold up on a weak base. A proper foundation is key, one that sets the shed slightly off the ground to aid water drainage and reduce moisture transfer. There are different foundation options, depending on where you live and the size and intended use of the shed, so bone up on the fundamentals and assess your options with this advice from the LP Outdoor Building Solutions team.
• Improper geographical placement — this is one of the huge mistakes one may make while shed building. It may be too close to your house hence obstructing your beautiful view from your living room or your kitchen as you are cooking. The last thing one would want is not like your house because of a simple thing as a view, so be careful with where you place your shed. One may also build the shed too far away from their house which again is an inconvenience. Who would want to walk from your house to your shed to get some tool you need and you have to trek some long distance? You may also need your shed someplace you can see due to the security reasons. You would want some stupid thief taking your stuff without you see them, would you? Or walking down a snowy lane during a chilly night just so you could get something from your shed. Before building your shed consider all the factors whether positive or negative and then come up with the place in your compound with the most advantages compared to disadvantages. 

Build the framework for the side walls. The bottom plate of each side wall should be the same length as the distance between the bottom plates of the front and back wall (so that the side walls will fit between them). The standard spacing between vertical wall studs in the US is 16 inches (from center to center, not from edge to edge); since this stud spacing doesn’t perfectly divide into the total length of the side walls in the example design, the two outermost studs make up for this discrepancy by being slightly closer to their neighbors. Most importantly, the top plate is angled so that the roof will be sloped, which makes the height of each vertical stud slightly different. If you’re not sure how to calculate the necessary height of each vertical stud in advance, make the two outermost vertical studs first, lay them the correct distance apart, cut a top plate that spans this distance, and then cut each remaining vertical stud individually based on the distance between the top and bottom plates at that exact location.[8]
Whether you build your own trusses or order them from the lumberyard, building a roof with trusses is much easier than framing a roof one rafter at a time. As a general rule when learning how to build a shed roof, you’ll need one truss every 2 ft. If you build your own, the cost will be about half this amount. Connect the framing for site-built trusses with plywood gussets glued and screwed to the joints.
Because the shed is designed to abut to another structure, the foundation need only be pressure-treated skids, the roof pitched in only one direction to shed water, and the back wall sheathed with 1/2-inch CDX plywood, which withstands indirect exposure to moisture. See Anatomy of an Outdoor Shed or Playhouse for more about typical shed construction.
The design of the shed you choose will depend on what you will be using it for and were it will be located. If you just need a small shed to place garden equipment, a lean to shed can be ideal. This design of shed will not take much room and it can be placed next to a fence or wall. The lean to shed has a single sloped roof design. It is one of the most common for garden tools as well as pool equipment and chemicals.
Don’t be tempted to get sloppy when you square up the floor and walls of your shed. An out-of-square start will haunt you through the rest of the project, from doors and windows to trim and roofing. For a concrete slab, measure diagonally across the opposite corners of the form boards. Then adjust the forms until the diagonal measurements are equal. Do the same for a wood platform floor. If you’re installing sheet siding on the walls, before you stand them up, measure diagonally and square up the wall before you nail on the siding.
The walls of the foundation have been created and the electrical is all set, now all that needs to be done is to fill the gaping hole in between them with limestone agrigate.  We also threw in some concrete paving stones that we had lying around because we don't plan on using them and we had already tried to give them away.  After the limestone is in place tamp it down by jumping on it and keep filling up any places that are no longer level.  After the entire base is filled with as much limestone as you can fit put a sprinkler on to soak it and set it for the next hour or so.  You may need to add a bit more limestone after this is done as well.
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