My advice... Don't do-it-all-yourself. Novice and pro alike can benefit from each other in DIY. You might have the shed location leveled by a landscaper; get a referral to outsource the shed's foundation to a building subcontractor; you can even have the roof's trusses made by a local truss company and the shingles installed by a handyman or roofer.
· Gambrel styled shed — it is a very common type of shed. Its roof is highly steep and is four sided. This type of shed at some point resembles a hexagon. This type of shed is preferred as the shape of its roof makes the interior of the shed to be spacious hence creating more space where a lot of garden and outdoor tools can be stored. In this type of shed, one may have a workshop in the shed. They can even accommodate a car due to their large spaces.

A garden shed can be strictly functional, but it can also be a decorative focal point around which you design your garden or yard. These plans will help you build a basic shed, but don’t stop there! To customize your shed, you could create a combination toolshed and greenhouse, put a martin house on top, or use part of the shed for a chicken coop or rabbit hutch. If you’re feeling even more adventurous, you could create a living roof of moss or succulent plants.
We built the Colonial-style garden shed shown here from a set of mail-order building plans. The 10 x 16-ft. outbuilding has easy-to-install plywood siding, three large windows and two pairs of doors. The entire building could be used for storage, but we decided to divide the interior space into two separate areas: a 4 x 10-ft. tool-storage area and a 10 x 12-ft. children's playroom.

Are you one of those people who love woodworking and seek joy out of it? If yes, well you might already know that every woodworking project requires a certain amount of time and effort to be invested in it. In some cases, it’s almost the same as the construction projects, and many people say that building a wooden shed is synonymous to building a brick wall. Even when it’s easy and simple, you should have adequate knowledge to successfully implement the design plan.


If you need lots of space for storage, garden room, or office space, the most common design will be the gable shed. The gable roof design has two sloped roof that resembles a little house. This design is the most popular because it blends will with your home. The gambrel shed resembles a barn. It is great for storage as no space will go to waste. A larger size gambrel shed will have enough room to build a loft. Having a loft will keep everything organized and allow you to store more stuff. By installing a ramp to the shed you can also store ATV, snowmobiles, jet skis, trailers, and such things.

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Because My Shed Plans does not promise anything beyond belief, the product’s foundation is pretty strong. People have enjoyed choosing between the collections of shed layouts and building it themselves. It’s a great activity for the whole family, since it’s all well planned out. It can be a bonding experience, the way a team building exercise at work is.
When you have around 12,000 plans that are claimed to be shed designs, not all of them can be good. Some of them are predominant, some of them are mediocre while some of them are utterly absurd and are even hard to read. There are even incomplete plans in the Ryan Shed Plans package, and many of these plans don’t include the materials, making it frustrating. The download pages of most of the designs in Ryan Shed Plans are not organized.
Firewood sheds are simple sheds designed to help your firewood dry out and also keep it from getting a lot of water on the wood when it rains or snows. The simple open front design allows the wood to be easily accessible and increases air flow around the stacked wood. The floors are designed using 2x4 boards spaced 1" apart to provide plenty of strength and allow allow air to circulate up through the floor and around the wood to season it properly. The roofs are corrugated metal but they can also be roofed with asphalt shingles.
Our wood greenhouse shed plans have lots of windows and use clear polycarbonate roofing that lets in plenty of light to keep your plants happy and green. Several designs use the same doors that are installed on residential homes to keep construction simple and allow the door to have a glass panel to let in even more sunlight. The floors are made using 2x6 pressure treated wood so plants can be watered inside without the worry of damaging the floor.

When you’ve decided on a shed location, dig two trenches 16 in. wide, 12 in. deep and 13 ft. long. Center the trenches 66 in. apart. Fill the trenches with a 3-in. layer of gravel and compact it with a hand tamper. Repeat this process until the trench is full. Use a level and long board to level the top layer of gravel. If the ground is flat, also make sure the gravel beds in the two trenches are level with each other.


One last thing about shed sizes, it’s a good idea to always measure out the dimensions in your own garden before you invest any money. You can do this easily by using a couple of stakes and a string to measure out the space. That’s how the pros do it. Make sure that you leave enough room on all sides of the shed to help with rain drainage and prevent water damage.
Each truss is made up of two 2 x 4 rafters and one 2 x 4 ceiling joist. The three boards are joined together with 1/2-in. plywood gussets. To speed up the assembly process, build all the trusses on the shed floor before erecting the walls. Start by cutting all the rafters to length with a 40° angle at one end of each. Cut 2 x 4s to 10 ft. long for the bottom chords of the trusses. Also, cut all of the plywood gussets.
A thing you might want to check is if regulations require a minimum setback from the property line. This is often overlooked and come back to bite you. A silly thing I found out when I built my shed, my jurisdiction in California treats buildings differently depending on what they are called on the permit. I called my shed a barn because I built a gambrel roof and it looked like a barn. My surprise....A barn must be 50 feet away from any structures occupied by humans. A shed can be almost against the house.....same size, same shape,,,just different names.
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