· Firewood storage sheds — mainly used to store firewood from elements of weather such as rainfall that may destroy them. The most common type of firewood shed is the lean on shed. It is also the most suitable as it allows free circulation of air, therefore, preventing dampness of the firewood. It is also near the house so the firewood is stored near your house and may access anytime you need them.
A tool shed is pretty easy to build. We found this inspiring example on thecavenderdiary which, as you can see, has a pretty straight-forward, traditional look. It has its back on the wall and inside there’s not much worth mentioning, except maybe for those practical storage hooks, shelves and rods on the inside of the doors. Check out the plans for this toolshed and find a way to customize them according to your own storage needs.

The last project we want to share with you today is a greenhouse/ garden shed which we found on lizmarieblog. It’s really cute and inside you can find shelves, storage compartments and a bunch of other practical things. In addition to all that, this lovely shed even has a chandelier. It’s a decorative element and it really elevates the decor to a whole new level.


In a perfect world, all of the studs would be straight, but since they aren’t, make sure to pick the best ones to use at corners and at door and window openings. Sight down the length of the studs and set aside the ones that are perfectly straight. While you’re at it, also set aside studs that are really crooked. You can cut these up to use as cripples or blocking. You may find other uses for short pieces later on.
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Build the framework for all four walls. To account for the fact that the front and back walls are different from each other (due to the doorframe in the front) and the side walls must both be sloped (to prevent rain from collecting on the roof), each of these will have to be tackled somewhat differently. It’s easiest to construct the back first, the front second, and the two sides last, as shown in the numbered image below. See How to Frame a Wall for more information before you read the instructions below.[5] 

how to build a shed

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