Sheds have become multipurpose, must-have buildings that are competing with pergolas and gazebos as your next backyard project. Pictures on social media only grab people's desires more. Before going any further, do your research. Figure out what you need it for and why, and whether you will build the shed yourself, or hire a pro. Check with your local planning department to comply with codes and guidelines. Determine if the shed will mirror the architectural features of your home--always a good idea. Assess your budget, materials needed, and the time it will take to complete the project.
We decided to construct the foundation of our shed out of cinderblocks.  This will help keep out any rodents, and doesn't risk harming the trees beside the shed.  In order to lay a good foundation, we first had to level out the ground. We didn't need to level out the middle of the structure's base because that was later filled with limestone screening.  We made channels for the cinderblocks with spades and a pickaxe, and made sure to create a channel for the electrical as well.  The electricity comes from our house, which is about 10 feet away from where the shed stands.
My Shed Plans just might be every do-it-yourself junkie’s dream product. Ryan Henderson, the creator of My Shed Plans, has been building one-of-a-kind outdoor sheds for more than 20 years. If you believe his story, he has unselfishly decided to share his love of woodworking and carpentry through his guides which will enable the everyman who does not have handyman experience to build their very own outdoor shed. Can it be true?

The walls of the foundation have been created and the electrical is all set, now all that needs to be done is to fill the gaping hole in between them with limestone agrigate.  We also threw in some concrete paving stones that we had lying around because we don't plan on using them and we had already tried to give them away.  After the limestone is in place tamp it down by jumping on it and keep filling up any places that are no longer level.  After the entire base is filled with as much limestone as you can fit put a sprinkler on to soak it and set it for the next hour or so.  You may need to add a bit more limestone after this is done as well.
Nobody knows your garden better than you. Nobody loves your garden as much as you. You would know how your garden, including its soil, surrounding plants and other elements, function in different weather conditions. Wouldn’t it make sense if you yourself decide what type of foundation to lay, how to ensure the shed’s stability keeping in mind the surroundings and the base?

I would advise you to aim for the type of wood that is resistant to deforming, fading, pets and dampness. Once at a local lumberyard, request for the heartwood, which is the innermost part of the wood in a tree. Unlike sapwood which is the outer most wood found in a tree, it is resistant to harsh conditions. The following species of wood are suitable for shed building: Cedar, Cyprus, and Redwood. Before buying the wood, check thoroughly that it has been well processed. Be cautious of wet wood to avoid shrinkage after you have already bought it and also Greenwood which may cause you inconveniences. The most common type of outdoor wood is pressure treated and consists of pine and fir.


Cut the treated 6x6s to 12 ft. and set them on the gravel so they’re parallel and the outside edges are 6 ft. apart. On sloped ground, you’ll have to raise the 6×6 on the low side until it’s level with the adjacent 6×6. Do this by stacking treated 2x6s, 4x6s or 6x6s on top of the treated 6×6 to reach the right height. Use a 4-ft. or longer level to make sure the 6x6s are level and level with each other. Finally, square the 6x6s by adjusting the position of one 6×6. Slide the 6×6 back and forth, not sideways, until the diagonal measurements from opposite corners are equal. Build the platform with treated 2x6s, 24 in. on center, and cover it with treated 3/4-in. plywood (Figure B).
This shed, one of our most popular outdoor storage sheds ever, features some unique details that make it look more expensive than it really was to build. Arch-top windows and a custom door give this shed a high-quality look that belies its low cost and simple construction. The panelized construction technique means you could build the parts in your garage on a rainy weekend and then haul them to the site for assembly. Modest finishes like OSB siding and composite trim and fiberglass shingles help keep the materials cost low. And you’ll save hundreds of dollars by providing your own labor to build the door and windows for some cheap outdoor storage. The modular construction and wood platform foundation mean you can construct this shed almost anywhere, even on remote or sloping sites. In this article, we’ll show you the basics of how to build the shed and install the windows and doors.
Are you one of those people who love woodworking and seek joy out of it? If yes, well you might already know that every woodworking project requires a certain amount of time and effort to be invested in it. In some cases, it’s almost the same as the construction projects, and many people say that building a wooden shed is synonymous to building a brick wall. Even when it’s easy and simple, you should have adequate knowledge to successfully implement the design plan.
With the wall in position, secure it by screwing down through the bottom 2 x 4 plate and into the floor framing. Frame and erect the rear wall, followed by the front wall. Then, install the interior partition. If you're including a playroom, as we did, cover the partition side that faces that room with plywood, and screw it in place. Then install the final wall.
Does this all sound very promising and great, but you still have your doubts about not being certain how to build a shed and if you are brave enough to buy the shed blueprints? We can help here as well with our newest book How to build a tiny house. This step by step guide with illustration and photographs provides useful information and in-depth instructions regarding every area of timber frame construction and its foundations, walls, roof and floor. You can order it anytime on our website, in a print version or as ebook.
The toughest and most important part of building a shed is finding the right plans. Sure you can just start building without plans, but do you know how it will look when you are done? Or you can search for free plans, but are they designed right? What I recommend is finding plans, even if it means you have to pay a little. Make sure that sample plans are provided so you know what you are getting. Do not make a purchase just because they show lots of nice sheds but no sample of the actual plans you will be buying. Look for the following before you decide to purchase:

Most homeowners barely have enough time to keep their homes in shape, never mind their sheds. Heck, I was supposed to paint our downstairs bathroom before the kids got out of school last month. I just picked up the paint yesterday. That's why it's smart to choose low-maintenance materials for your shed. You usually need to pay a bit extra for these, but they'll save you time and trouble in the long run.


Working from ladders is more dangerous than working from scaffolding. Plus, having to constantly move ladders around is time consuming. When you get to the roof construction, consider renting a set of scaffolding with wheels. You’ll be amazed at how much easier it is to have a stable platform to work from and to set your tools and materials on. You can rent a 5-ft.-tall section of scaffold with three planks and wheels for about $110 per week.

DIY Shed Plans

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