2012: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12  |  2013: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12  |  2014: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12  |  2015: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12  |  2016: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12  |  2017: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12  |  2018: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12  |  2019: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
Don Vandervort has developed his expertise for more than 30 years, as Building Editor for Sunset Books, Senior Editor at Home Magazine, author of more than 30 home improvement books, and writer of countless magazine articles. He appeared for 3 seasons on HGTV’s “The Fix,” and served as MSN’s home expert for several years. Don founded HomeTips in 1996.
Don’t be tempted to get sloppy when you square up the floor and walls of your shed. An out-of-square start will haunt you through the rest of the project, from doors and windows to trim and roofing. For a concrete slab, measure diagonally across the opposite corners of the form boards. Then adjust the forms until the diagonal measurements are equal. Do the same for a wood platform floor. If you’re installing sheet siding on the walls, before you stand them up, measure diagonally and square up the wall before you nail on the siding.
If you're always in a hurry and terrible with commitments, I might suggest you rent a storage space or continue parking your forty thousand dollar cars in the driveway and save your garage space for unused furniture, bicycles, unpacked boxes, garden rakes, and lawn mowers. Because, the biggest enemy in do-it-yourself is not the lack of carpentry skills or ability to follow directions, but lack of planning and failure to schedule the time it takes to get the job done.
When you start to look at the plans, you realize some are absurdly out of date, or impossible to read because they are blurred - just like everyone else has reported on this site. What was even more appalling was it appeared most, if not all of what I had purchased, was easily available for free online. Some material looked as though it may have been pilfered - or "borrowed without permission or attribution from educational sites. And much of the "VIP-Premium" content was past its copyright - which is great if you want a children's woodworking book from the 1800's for historical purposes, which I'm sure is a fascinating read, but all that was ultimately meaningless since the sum total of what I downloaded offered nothing of any immediate benefit toward building a shed from a quality, step-by-step plan, with 3-D renderings, Material lists, and best practices, etc to help you build quickly, efficiently, and have something you can use and be proud of. I think the only proprietary plans must the the freebie they give away to entice you to pony up.
If you are looking for the best collection of outdoor shed plans, then look no further. ‘My Shed Plans’ by Ryan Henderson’ is perhaps among the best collection of shed plans you can find anywhere today. It is a collection of around 12,000 woodworking plans which are designed to cater to the needs of both professional and amateur woodworkers. With over 20 years of experience in shed building, Ryan is an authority in the field. His plans are explained well with step by step instructions. If you follow his shed plans and instructions properly, you will be able to build one with ease. It doesn’t matter if your woodworking skills are basic or if you have failed in making a shed before, by following his shed plans you can undertake any such project with confidence.
If you don’t plan to have electricity running through your shed, this is the shed building tip you will want to listen to most. Windows easily brighten up a shed so you don’t have to hunt around for a flashlight or a lantern if you’re old school, every time you need to grab something from your shed. But…don’t go nuts and install a ton of windows or you will be giving up valuable space to hang tools or shelves.
Garden Sheds are the most common type of sheds that you find in every backyard. Right from the typical Colorbond Shed to the charming mini building adjoined shed that is made of both timber and steel, they bring beauty to the build. Garden Buildings are basically must because most of the houses tend to be beautiful with these. They are incredibly beautiful, authentic and useful for everyone for some or other purpose. Therefore, the Ryan Shed Plans contain some of the very feasible Garden Shed plans from which you can pick a design that seems suitable to you.
As you can see, I have no pictures of the doors being created.  This is because they took way too much trouble to make, and I didn't really have the patience to take pictures of them being built because they were tested and redone about 3 times.  Lesson to be learned:  leave the tolerances bigger than you think they will need to be, you can always use weather strips to help close them up later.  After 3 attempts, we finnally got the doors to work properly.  The one door is held in place with sliding dead-bolts to the floor and ceiling frames and the second door is attached to it with another dead-bolt.

Ø Large sheds — they are larger in size compared to the other type of sheds we have mentioned above. They have enough space that one can accommodate outdoor tools and still carry out activities. They can be used as offices. However, if used as an office, one will have to be careful while carrying out their activities to avoid substances that may hurt or prick them as they are moving around.
Structurally speaking, some sheds are actually miniature versions of houses or barns. The gambrel storage shed plans from mybackyardplans explain the basic steps of such a project. First, the foundation is built. Then the sidewalls are installed, after that comes the roof frame, the front wall and the door, then the back wall and roof decking, the trim and finally the shingles. At the very end, the shed is painted.

A backyard shed frees up your home and garage by storing cumbersome essentials like your riding mower, hedge trimmers, and other lawn care equipment. But these sturdy little buildings can serve a host of other practical functions—and hobbies too. Think chicken coop, greenhouse, screening room—the list is limitless! For a shed to live up to its potential, however, it’s crucial to avoid common building mistakes. The dos and don’ts listed here, courtesy of the LP® Outdoor Building Solutions® pros, will help ensure that your shed meets your needs for years to come, whether you’re simply using it for storage or tricking it out as your outdoor fun zone.
For example, the last three sheds I built were trimmed with white PVC trim boards instead of painted cedar 1 x 4s. This new plastic lumber, which I used for the rake, fascia, frieze and corner boards, is impervious to bugs, warping, splitting or decay, and it never needs painting. Other low-maintenance options include: vinyl or aluminum windows, faux-slate roof shingles, fiberglass or steel doors, composite decking for steps, and fiber-cement siding. (I don't usually recommend aluminum or vinyl siding for sheds; neither material is rugged enough to survive the inevitable beating outbuildings take.)
I don't waste my time on free plans, store-bought sheds, or ready-made, mail order kit solutions... been there, done that. Free means lack of user feedback and you get absolutely no customer support. With store-bought and ready-made mail order sheds: they're flimsy, profit-driven solutions that I've always had to tear apart and modify too much to get the storage space to work or to match the character and style of the home.
Assemble the four wall structures. Wall structures are usually nailed to the underlying support from the bottom up. However, if this is not possible with the design you’ve chosen, simply nail them downwards through the plywood and joists or toenail them into place by driving the nails downwards and at an angle. Note that you will probably need other people to help you hold the wall structures up until they can be attached to one another.[9]
Made from durable blow molded resin, this Alpine shed from Suncast comes complete with 14 windows with delightful contrast trim. The double doors are built with articulating metal hardware so they’re robust and durable. The floor is reinforced for the ultimate sturdy foundation. Extra roof support is provided by the metal trusses and ridge beaming. This shed is perfect when you’re looking for something that is built tough, and stands out beyond the more flimsy and cheap designs that you find on the market. It is large enough to stow everything that you need and keep all items clean, safe, and secure. The outer appearance of this shed makes it perfect for those who want an attractive external design that doesn’t stick out like a sore thumb in your yard. All in all, customer reviews across the board are quite positive for this shed, and it makes a great addition to anyone’s home.
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If you have a router, use a hinge-mortising bit (or straight bit) to cut the hinge recesses (Photo 10). Otherwise, use a sharp chisel. Screw the hinges to the door and trim. To hang the door, line up a temporary 2×4 with the bottom of the siding and screw it to the wall. Then rest the door on the 2×4 and drive 3-in. screws through the trim into the framing to hold the door in place (Photo 11). Finish the door installation by adding the top and side trim pieces.
Each truss is made up of two 2 x 4 rafters and one 2 x 4 ceiling joist. The three boards are joined together with 1/2-in. plywood gussets. To speed up the assembly process, build all the trusses on the shed floor before erecting the walls. Start by cutting all the rafters to length with a 40° angle at one end of each. Cut 2 x 4s to 10 ft. long for the bottom chords of the trusses. Also, cut all of the plywood gussets.
· Personal belongings storage shed — as you are growing older each and every day, you may tend to accumulate so many items that congest your house. You may not want to throw or give away any of the items accumulated as they probably hold a sentimental value to you. The best way in which you can solve a headache is by building yourself a shed which you can be storing your personal items as you continue accumulating them.
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