Ryan Henderson is a master woodworker with over 30 years experience and has developed Ryan’s Shed Plans.  This is a detailed digital book with 12,000 shed plans available for instant download with many different bonus offers.  The plans are detailed because they are written by a master woodworker.  He has taught many newbie woodworkers over the past 30 years how to build sheds and other woodworking projects.  He is skilled in the art of woodworking and put together a nice, large set of plans.  The plans are easy to read with step-by-step instructions.
Don Vandervort has developed his expertise for more than 30 years, as Building Editor for Sunset Books, Senior Editor at Home Magazine, author of more than 30 home improvement books, and writer of countless magazine articles. He appeared for 3 seasons on HGTV’s “The Fix,” and served as MSN’s home expert for several years. Don founded HomeTips in 1996.
I have recently purchased a house with an older roof that needs to be restored soon. So, I am trying to decide on I should go with a metal roof other than shingles. If I install metal roofing over solid decking such as OSB or plywood, integrate with a properly insulated garret, there is very little noise difference compared to standard asphalt shingles. I have briefly read benefits and drawbacks of Metal roofing but as I listed before I should go to metal roofing and hiring a roofing contractor no matter its expensive or noisy anyhow, Your article has cleared a lot of misinterpretation I’ve had before.
I think that we had to purchase some additional hangers that were built especially for bike tires. This system worked pretty well, one comment that I have is that they don't hold up to the weight of several combined bikes as well as I would like. You need to make sure that the track is anchored very often, as having hooks in between anchor points starts to flex the main rail and can result in the hooks popping off.

Then, you will need to install a series of floor joists across the entire length of the support beams; these will need to be the same length as the distance between the two rim joints so that they’ll fit between them. In the example design, the floor joists are all separated by 14.5-inch gaps except for the outermost two, which are 13 3⁄4 inches (34.9 cm) from their immediate neighbors; this is to allow a standard piece of plywood to line up with the outermost edge of the outermost joist but only cover half of an interior joist, allowing its neighbor to cover the other half so that both can be supported properly.[3]


I would advise you to aim for the type of wood that is resistant to deforming, fading, pets and dampness. Once at a local lumberyard, request for the heartwood, which is the innermost part of the wood in a tree. Unlike sapwood which is the outer most wood found in a tree, it is resistant to harsh conditions. The following species of wood are suitable for shed building: Cedar, Cyprus, and Redwood. Before buying the wood, check thoroughly that it has been well processed. Be cautious of wet wood to avoid shrinkage after you have already bought it and also Greenwood which may cause you inconveniences. The most common type of outdoor wood is pressure treated and consists of pine and fir.

In a perfect world, all of the studs would be straight, but since they aren’t, make sure to pick the best ones to use at corners and at door and window openings. Sight down the length of the studs and set aside the ones that are perfectly straight. While you’re at it, also set aside studs that are really crooked. You can cut these up to use as cripples or blocking. You may find other uses for short pieces later on.


There are many types of roof design that you can use to add to your shed. But since you are a beginner, I would advise you to build a simple roof structure so as to avoid the frustrations that can come with building complex roof structures. Complex roof structures also require additional tools and greats skills hence, it is time consuming and a bit expensive compared to the simple roof structure.
So it's not surprising that people often ask me for advice about putting together a backyard storage building. Sometimes I get asked questions that I couldn't possibly answer: "Do you think my husband and brother-in-law can build me a garden shed?" Or, "Would an 8 x 10-ft. shed be big enough to store all my stuff?" Gee, ma'am, I couldn't say. But often, the questions have something to do with shed design, framing or siding options. There, I can help. And so with these inquisitive souls in mind I present my favorite tricks of the shed trade.
For the masonry of the foundation we went out and bought 15 cinderblocks, and suplemented these with clay bricks that we got for free off of kijiji and some concrete pavestones from a neighbor's old patio.  Clay bricks can only be used above ground, other wise they will erode.  Looking back, it would have been easier to simply use cinderblocks and we strongly recommend it if you don't have other materials to get rid of.  Also, buy more mortar than you think you will need.  We ended up using a lot of mortar and if you have any extra you can always return it or pour it in the cinderblocks like we did to make the foundation even stronger.

A shed isn’t something you see people build…at least not very often. It’s rather the type of structure you discover in the backyard when you purchase an old house. So how do these things appear? They’re obviously built so let’s see what it takes so put a shed together. We looked around and we found a bunch of shed plans that we’d like to share with you. They’re pretty simple and you don’t need much experience with this sort of projects to be able to pull it off. They’re all customizable so you can enjoy them whether you want a pretty she shed or a manly workshop.
Because My Shed Plans does not promise anything beyond belief, the product’s foundation is pretty strong. People have enjoyed choosing between the collections of shed layouts and building it themselves. It’s a great activity for the whole family, since it’s all well planned out. It can be a bonding experience, the way a team building exercise at work is.

When people talk about the different types of shed available, what they should describe are the different types of roof available, since sheds only really differ by the type of roof they have. We provide shed plans for three types of roof: Gable, Lean-To and Hip. Gable, Lean-To and Hip roofs each have their pros and cons. Gable roofs are the most common since they are simple to build and offer plenty of space. Lean-To sheds are popular too for confined spaces. Hip roof sheds are the most complex to build, but they are arguably the most desirable too since they have a more uniform appearance. In terms of shed size, you should choose one that fills the space you have in your yard but you should also consider the overhang for the roof. A 16X24 shed is big enough for vehicle storage and to be used as a workshop, while a 12X16 shed is perfect for storing all your yard tools and mechanical equipment. Sheds smaller than this are fine for basic storage. Gable, Lean-To and Hip roofs each have their pros and cons. Gable roofs are the most common since they are simple to build and offer plenty of space. Lean-to sheds are popular too for confined spaces. Hip roof sheds are the most complex to build, but they are arguably the most desirable too since they have a more uniform appearance. In terms of shed size, you should choose one that fills the space you have in your yard but you should also consider the overhang for the roof. A 16X24 shed is big enough for vehicle storage and to be used as a workshop, while a 12X16 shed is perfect for storing all your yard tools and mechanical equipment. Sheds smaller than this are fine for basic storage. Gable, Lean-To and Hip roofs each have their pros and cons. Gable roofs are the most common since they are simple to build and offer plenty of space. Lean-To sheds are popular too for confined spaces. Hip roof sheds are the most complex to build, but they are arguably the most desirable too since they have a more uniform appearance. In terms of shed size, you should choose one that fills the space you have in your yard but you should also consider the overhang for the roof. A 16X24 shed is big enough for vehicle storage and to be used as a workshop, while a 12X16 shed is perfect for storing all your yard tools and mechanical equipment. Sheds smaller than this are fine for basic storage.


You will find that the shed blueprints are mostly just that. These are not step-by-step instructional material like you might think. Instead, they are merely design drawings. They include a variety of views, (plan, elevation, perspective), and a description. Sometimes you’ll get a materials list. And while there are admittedly a few that give full instructions, most of them are just shed designs and plans. But because they’re from different sources, some of them are the wrong way round.

Would we do it again? I won’t sugar coat it, this is real life so probably not. Some things aren’t worth the aggravation or the stress. In the end, we didn’t save that much money by building the shed ourselves. I think the total cost was around $1200. But I can tell you one thing, if we are ever attacked by zombies or if there is an Armageddon I am hiding in the shed because the big bad wolf can huff and puff and nothing is taking this structure down. 
For the masonry of the foundation we went out and bought 15 cinderblocks, and suplemented these with clay bricks that we got for free off of kijiji and some concrete pavestones from a neighbor's old patio.  Clay bricks can only be used above ground, other wise they will erode.  Looking back, it would have been easier to simply use cinderblocks and we strongly recommend it if you don't have other materials to get rid of.  Also, buy more mortar than you think you will need.  We ended up using a lot of mortar and if you have any extra you can always return it or pour it in the cinderblocks like we did to make the foundation even stronger.

Make a template on the shed floor for assembling the trusses. Begin by laying out the parts for one truss. Align the bottom chord with the edge of the plywood floor. Then cut four 24-in.-long 2 x 4s. Lay two alongside each rafter and screw them to the plywood floor. Now use these short boards as stopblocks for laying out and assembling each truss. Fasten plywood gussets to each side of every truss with carpenter's glue and 1-in. roofing nails and set the trusses aside.
This step by step diy project is about 10×20 gable shed plans. This shed has a beautiful designs, so it is not only for storage but also for enhancing the look of your garden. The access is easy due to the double doors on one end, and a simple door on one side. The double doors will let plenty of light inside the shed. Take a look over the rest of my woodworking plans, if you want to get more building inspiration. Remember that you need to select the site for the shed with attention and that you have to comply with a few legal regulations.

These days, it is not very easy to translate your wooden shed plans into a standard written format without losing any valuable information. In order to learn how to build high quality wooden sheds, it is important to consult an expert. However, consulting an expert may not be viable for every individual. In addition to this, the internet provides you with extensive information about a wide range of subjects.

Now, imagine a price you think you might have to pay for such a comprehensive package – sure you will think not less than a few hundred at least. The good news is that Ryan is offering all of it at an unbelievable price of just $37. I am sure you were quite blown away when you heard about the quantity and quality of the shed plans and the bonuses you would be getting with them. So, doesn’t $37 for so many useful resources on woodworking sounds like a great idea. In my opinion, surely it is. Once, you have this collection in your arsenal, you are never going to run out of ideas. That is assured.


Level the ground (if necessary) and install deck piers along a grid to support the shed. The piers will allow you to string support beams beneath the floor of the shed. In the example design, the piers are spaced 6 feet (1.8 m) apart in one direction and 4 feet (1.2 m) apart in the other for a total grid area of 12 x 8 feet. This is convenient because once you lay supports along this grid, it will take exactly three standard 4- by 8-foot plywood sheets to cover it.[1]
When you use the information given in this program to build wooden sheds rather than focus on expensive materials, you will be able to save a huge amount of money. Everything in this program has been explained in an easy to understand method. When you purchase this program, it is important to find a reputed retailer. You need to find someone who sells only authentic products at reasonable prices.

For the masonry of the foundation we went out and bought 15 cinderblocks, and suplemented these with clay bricks that we got for free off of kijiji and some concrete pavestones from a neighbor's old patio.  Clay bricks can only be used above ground, other wise they will erode.  Looking back, it would have been easier to simply use cinderblocks and we strongly recommend it if you don't have other materials to get rid of.  Also, buy more mortar than you think you will need.  We ended up using a lot of mortar and if you have any extra you can always return it or pour it in the cinderblocks like we did to make the foundation even stronger.
I don't waste my time on free plans, store-bought sheds, or ready-made, mail order kit solutions... been there, done that. Free means lack of user feedback and you get absolutely no customer support. With store-bought and ready-made mail order sheds: they're flimsy, profit-driven solutions that I've always had to tear apart and modify too much to get the storage space to work or to match the character and style of the home.
First, a cute little shed that we found on ladygoats. It’s made of wood, like most sheds, and it has no windows. It’s great for storage but it’s also a nice idea for a workspace. You can turn it into a gardening shed, a place to keep all the tools and to get some things done while working in the garden. We love its simplicity and the fact that it has a playful character and a pretty chic look for a shed. It’s all in the details. In this case, it’s the roof and the hardware that make all the difference.
By searching online you can find some free shed plans that are decent. Most often though these plans will be geared towards more experienced builders and they will not be very detailed. If you are a first time builder look for plans you can understand, even if it means paying a little. Use plans that contain a material list and plenty of details if this is your first time. Most free plans available are not as detailed with the building steps, so free is not always a good idea. If you go to the top of this page I have provided a list of some of the best plans from reputable websites.
Since the shade is an outdoor structure, it will face various weather elements like sunshine, rain, snow, wind and other factors as insects and moulds. If you are not sure on the wood selection, it would be better to seek advice from a wood expert who will guide you through the best wood you would use to build your shed depending on the climate your region experiences.
You can build the walls on any flat surface, but the shed platform is ideal. Snap chalk lines on the plywood deck, 3-1/2 in. from the edges of the platform, to indicate the inside edge of the walls. Measure to make sure the lines are parallel and 89 in. apart. Then chalk a line down the center (Photo 1). You’ll use this line to make sure the angled top plates meet in the center.
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