First off, building your own shed through our free or PREMIUM shed plans means you are saving the cost of a professional. If you are wondering you have zero experience in wood working then you shouldn’t be worried; our plans come with precise instructions, material list, diagrams, instructions, etc. There would be absolutely nothing that would leave you wondering.
Since outdoor space is limited in a big city, everyone knows you must make smart use of vertical real estate. For a greenhouse/shed in San Francisco's Bernal Heights, Step 3 Studio designed in an open-framework structure that provides shelter for a garden shed that stores potting materials and plants on the ground floor. A steel staircase was built on site, which leads to a second level surfaced in steel grid mesh. The higher elevation is the perfect spot for container plants that require more sun. It's also a nice place to hang out and enjoy views of the city, day or night.
Thanks for sharing such detailed plans Seamster. I'm hoping to build a very small lean-to tool shed (2.5X4.5' base) for my very small yard and this has given me a lot of insight. Currently, theor the table and mitre saws I inherited are stored in our spare bedroom... eventual nursery room. I want to get them into their own space outdoors sooner than later. Here in North Carolina with the humid summers I think it would be best to add some housewrap to the walls to help protect the tools. I also have a situation where the back wall will only be 4-6" off the house so need to construct/panel my walls before erecting them. Do you know if it's reasonable to panel then wrap each wall frame, side it and then finally erect and fasten? Would be very grateful for your thoughts!
Now, let’s talk about small domestics sheds in details and then try to determine if one of the small types is what you need. The least-expensive and simplest sheds are those that anyone can get in a form of a kit. Both DIY plans and sheds kit plans for plastic and wooden sheds are available. Some of the advantages of small storage sheds are they use less land area, are less likely to obstruct the view and they do not clash with the garden landscaping.
For a freestanding shed, you can build the shed on top of a concrete slab (see Pouring a Concrete Slab) instead of the pressure-treated skids and floor joists; this will actually result in a sturdier—more permanent— structure. Otherwise, for a freestanding shed, the foundation should be constructed on concrete piers or poured footings (see Pouring Concrete Footings & Piers).  Be aware that building on footings will raise the height of the shed up from the ground.
For example, the last three sheds I built were trimmed with white PVC trim boards instead of painted cedar 1 x 4s. This new plastic lumber, which I used for the rake, fascia, frieze and corner boards, is impervious to bugs, warping, splitting or decay, and it never needs painting. Other low-maintenance options include: vinyl or aluminum windows, faux-slate roof shingles, fiberglass or steel doors, composite decking for steps, and fiber-cement siding. (I don't usually recommend aluminum or vinyl siding for sheds; neither material is rugged enough to survive the inevitable beating outbuildings take.)
This is another shed building tip about the location of your shed. While it would be great to let your shed blend into the shrubbery on your property, but it isn’t really realistic. You want to allow your shed to breathe which means giving it space from trees, fences and shrubs. A few feet all around will let the materials breathe effectively and direct sunlight will ensure mold and mildew stay far away.
Working from ladders is more dangerous than working from scaffolding. Plus, having to constantly move ladders around is time consuming. When you get to the roof construction, consider renting a set of scaffolding with wheels. You’ll be amazed at how much easier it is to have a stable platform to work from and to set your tools and materials on. You can rent a 5-ft.-tall section of scaffold with three planks and wheels for about $110 per week.

DIY Shed Plans

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