A garden shed can be strictly functional, but it can also be a decorative focal point around which you design your garden or yard. These plans will help you build a basic shed, but don’t stop there! To customize your shed, you could create a combination toolshed and greenhouse, put a martin house on top, or use part of the shed for a chicken coop or rabbit hutch. If you’re feeling even more adventurous, you could create a living roof of moss or succulent plants. 

• Improper geographical placement — this is one of the huge mistakes one may make while shed building. It may be too close to your house hence obstructing your beautiful view from your living room or your kitchen as you are cooking. The last thing one would want is not like your house because of a simple thing as a view, so be careful with where you place your shed. One may also build the shed too far away from their house which again is an inconvenience. Who would want to walk from your house to your shed to get some tool you need and you have to trek some long distance? You may also need your shed someplace you can see due to the security reasons. You would want some stupid thief taking your stuff without you see them, would you? Or walking down a snowy lane during a chilly night just so you could get something from your shed. Before building your shed consider all the factors whether positive or negative and then come up with the place in your compound with the most advantages compared to disadvantages.
Ryan Henderson is a master woodworker with over 30 years experience and has developed Ryan’s Shed Plans.  This is a detailed digital book with 12,000 shed plans available for instant download with many different bonus offers.  The plans are detailed because they are written by a master woodworker.  He has taught many newbie woodworkers over the past 30 years how to build sheds and other woodworking projects.  He is skilled in the art of woodworking and put together a nice, large set of plans.  The plans are easy to read with step-by-step instructions.
Make a template on the shed floor for assembling the trusses. Begin by laying out the parts for one truss. Align the bottom chord with the edge of the plywood floor. Then cut four 24-in.-long 2 x 4s. Lay two alongside each rafter and screw them to the plywood floor. Now use these short boards as stopblocks for laying out and assembling each truss. Fasten plywood gussets to each side of every truss with carpenter's glue and 1-in. roofing nails and set the trusses aside.
• Wastage of space — this is one of the greatest mistakes one can make. It is mostly caused by poor construction planning. You may such a mistake also by taking measurements poorly. You should consider all the activities and purposes that you will use your shed for before starting the construction. In that manner, you will be able to come up with a shed design that will suit its purpose and your wishes. One may also consider building a double floor shed to save on your compound space. You wouldn’t want to deny your kids their playing ground! You may also want to construct a different structure in the future then you get hindered due to the little space left or unless you would have to dig deeper into your pockets to modify your shed.
The toughest and most important part of building a shed is finding the right plans. Sure you can just start building without plans, but do you know how it will look when you are done? Or you can search for free plans, but are they designed right? What I recommend is finding plans, even if it means you have to pay a little. Make sure that sample plans are provided so you know what you are getting. Do not make a purchase just because they show lots of nice sheds but no sample of the actual plans you will be buying. Look for the following before you decide to purchase:
First off, building your own shed through our free or PREMIUM shed plans means you are saving the cost of a professional. If you are wondering you have zero experience in wood working then you shouldn’t be worried; our plans come with precise instructions, material list, diagrams, instructions, etc. There would be absolutely nothing that would leave you wondering.
In a Vero Beach, Florida, midcentury modern neighborhood, Sanders Pace Architecture retained the lines and essence of the original house while redesigning it for their client's 21st-century lifestyle. Although it's at the front of the house and initially might resemble a garage, the detached "shed" can be used as a private studio or for guests. Because it's located on the coast, hurricane-proof doors were needed, but cedar was installed over them for an attractive but sturdy structure.
To be sure, the whole permitting process can be a bit intimidating. And, if I'm being honest here, I've never been comfortable dealing with the city and all their codes - seems they're always moving the line on me. But, I always make it a point to be friendly with the Building Inspector. He's there to help and can be a fountain of information, when building your wood shed.
Ø Clay tiled sheds — as the name suggests, these are sheds that their roofs consist of clay tiles. The clay tiles make the wooden sheds look visually appealing. Nevertheless, one has to plan for the clay tiles from the foundation of the shed so that it can support the roof due to the bulkiness of the roof. The wooden walls need to be strong enough to support the roof. It would be advisable to hire an expert to install the clay tiled roof to avoid complications.
If you have the do-it-yourself skills and an open timeframe, check out the various plans available online or for purchase. Make sure you thoroughly understand the instructions and actually have the ability and tools to do the job. Other sources for sheds include prefabricated buildings that you would order from a reputable company and kits. Some include pre-cut lumber that is shipped to your house. Before ordering, find out if additional milling, drilling, or cutting will be needed, along with necessary tools.
Door placement is also important. You often see doors placed on the gable end of the building, which looks nice, but makes it virtually impossible to reach items stored at the rear of the shed. A better alternative is to put the door on the long side wall, so that you'll be able to access items to the right, left and back. Another option is to install doors on both gable-end walls, so that you'll be able to easily reach items from either end of the shed.
With that kind of quantity, there are indeed a lot of good designs that you can find in this pack. However, the absurd amount of content is abundant for all level of woodworkers. The drawings are exclusively technical with the bonus materials which make the package, a lifetime one. The designs in this package are brainstorming. As an amateur carpenter, I’m starting from a point where I haven’t taught of building design; I came a long way and half of the credit goes to Ryan Shed Plans. The shed plans provided here are very original and indeed are fun to build if you can combine a lot of plans into one.​
You can cut steel roofing panels with a circular saw and a carbide blade, but it’ll save you a lot of work if you order the panels the right length to start with. Plus, you’ll have a greater color selection if you order the roofing rather than buy off-the-shelf panels. Remember to order in advance, though, since it usually takes several weeks for the roofing to arrive. And make sure the overhangs are the right size so the panels will overhang the fascia slightly.
· Saltbox sheds — they are a very attractive type of sheds which one would not mind having it anywhere in the compound. Due to its shape, it can be used to store larger amounts of items and can be used in different ways depending on their size as they come in different sizes. They are also used as children playhouses. As in the gable shed, this type of shed has two faces of roofs which meet at the center to form a peak. The only difference between the two sheds is that the saltbox sheds one of the roof sides is significantly shorter than the other.
After laying out the 12 blocks, use a straight 2 x 4 and a 4-ft. level to ensure that all the blocks are level. Shim up any low blocks with strips of asphalt roofing, cedar shingles or 2-in.-thick concrete patio block. Next, form each front and rear band joist by nailing a 2 x 6 to a 2 x 8 mudsill. Set the mudsills on top of the blocks running across the front and rear of the shed. Cut a third 2 x 8 mudsill to fit along the tops of the center row of foundation blocks.
I felt that this is a very poorly setup web site. I purchased the Ryan’s shed plans online, did not receive an emailed receipt or link to the web site that worked. Phoned Clikbank and they promised to send another receipt. They did not. I had saved the original online confirmation with the links to the site. When I clicked on these it said the files couldn’t be found.

My Shed Plans by Ryan Henderson is a comprehensive collection of over 12,000 easy to follow, step-by-step Shed and Woodworking Plans. Plus, you are getting an additional 400 Woodworking Plans. What I don’t like about My Shed Plans is I will never ever build a fraction of these Amazing Shed Plans. There is just too many Shed Plans for a weekend warrior like myself.


Run! Do not walk away from this product! Total scam! The Ryan Shed Plans product promises 12,000 different do it yourself shed building plans. Instead what you get is a whole bunch of disconnected sketches, drawings, And partial blueprints that he has photo copied from hundreds of unrelated sources. I personally have several years of carpentry, homebuilding, and woodworking experience So I assumed that even if these so-called “shed building plans” we’re light on specific details I’d still be able to use them. WRONG! You will find that 99% of the“Plans“ are completely useless for the purpose of building a backyard shed. After an hour of grinding through the files included in that on my download, I did happen upon a singly reasonably complete building plan for a modest shed which included detail dimensions, material list, and the sorts of things needed to actually build a shed. Doing a little more research, I later found where this particular we’ll Drawn to plan had been ripped off from another legitimate Shed building website. Shame on you RyanShedPlans for marketing such a terrible, useless product. Judging from your online sales pitch you are clearly a gifted marketer. If you spent as much time developing a database of legitimate, usable shed plans as you did putting together your totally fraudulent marketing material, you would have an incredible product worth much much more then you’re charging. But I guess you I already know that.

If your shed site slopes, pouring concrete is a bigger job because you have to build strong forms and pour extra concrete on the downhill side. A simpler method is to build your shed floor like a deck, with footings, posts and a wood frame covered by plywood. If you don’t like the opening under the shed, build a skirt to cover the space between the shed floor and the ground.
· Wood sheds — these types of sheds are made of wood. They are the most common type of shed compared to metal and plastics. They are the most conducive as they can be used as children playhouses, outdoor office and still storage of garden tools. They are also easy to modify and renovate as increasing their size. They are preferred to other types as they blend well with the environment and give the environment a good natural look. However, they must be maintained regularly from insects as termites which feed on wood.
Because the shed is designed to abut to another structure, the foundation need only be pressure-treated skids, the roof pitched in only one direction to shed water, and the back wall sheathed with 1/2-inch CDX plywood, which withstands indirect exposure to moisture. See Anatomy of an Outdoor Shed or Playhouse for more about typical shed construction.
Figure A (above) and Figure E show how to build a shed and the exterior trim details. Start by mounting the brackets. Line up the outside edges of the lower brackets with the face of the siding, push them tight to the soffit and screw them to the wall. Center the top bracket on the peak and push it tight to the soffit. Starting with the pieces that go under the brackets, wrap the corners with the corner board. Overlap the front corner board onto the side corner board (Figure E).
My advice... Don't do-it-all-yourself. Novice and pro alike can benefit from each other in DIY. You might have the shed location leveled by a landscaper; get a referral to outsource the shed's foundation to a building subcontractor; you can even have the roof's trusses made by a local truss company and the shingles installed by a handyman or roofer. 

Make a template on the shed floor for assembling the trusses. Begin by laying out the parts for one truss. Align the bottom chord with the edge of the plywood floor. Then cut four 24-in.-long 2 x 4s. Lay two alongside each rafter and screw them to the plywood floor. Now use these short boards as stopblocks for laying out and assembling each truss. Fasten plywood gussets to each side of every truss with carpenter's glue and 1-in. roofing nails and set the trusses aside.
The last thing you want is to build a shed only to discover that it’s too small to hold your stuff, handle your hobby, or otherwise meet your needs. By the same token, you don’t want a shed that’s so large it overwhelms your property and looks ungainly behind your house. Choosing the wrong size shed is a common homeowner error, but LP Outdoor Building Solutions’ handy tool helps you get it just right. Check it out, and you’ll see that size does matter!

Nobody knows your garden better than you. Nobody loves your garden as much as you. You would know how your garden, including its soil, surrounding plants and other elements, function in different weather conditions. Wouldn’t it make sense if you yourself decide what type of foundation to lay, how to ensure the shed’s stability keeping in mind the surroundings and the base?
The trick for learning how to build a storage shed is to stretch the line across a scrap of wood at each end so there’s a space between the line and the part you’re straightening. On a wall, for example, tack small scraps of 1/2-in. plywood at each end of the top plate and stretch a line very tightly over the plywood. Then use a third scrap as a gauge to check the distance between the line and the lumber. Use braces or whatever is needed to adjust the top plate until the gauge just fits. Now your top plate will be perfectly straight.

Start by setting deck blocks on the ground, positioned as shown in the plans. While the area doesn’t have to be perfectly level, you should make the ground roughly level where each block will rest. Temporarily place some straight 2-by-6 lumber on edge in the top grooves of the blocks to orient the blocks in a straight line. Arrange two rows of four blocks parallel to each other to form both long walls, then measure diagonally across the outside corners to determine how square the arrangement is. If the two long walls are parallel, and diagonal measurements taken across corners are equal, then each corner is guaranteed to be 90 degrees. Finish up by placing one deck block in the middle of each 6-foot wall after you have aligned and squared the 8-foot walls.
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