• Lack of harmony — building a shed that does not match the design or the color of your house would make the compound look a bit odd. It is advisable that you choose a suitable architectural design and color that will closely match with your house. That gives your compound a great look and also makes it look like both structures were built at the same time. It also gives you a sense of satisfaction and hence you will not have to waste money in the future to make one structure resemble the other.

If you need lots of space for storage, garden room, or office space, the most common design will be the gable shed. The gable roof design has two sloped roof that resembles a little house. This design is the most popular because it blends will with your home. The gambrel shed resembles a barn. It is great for storage as no space will go to waste. A larger size gambrel shed will have enough room to build a loft. Having a loft will keep everything organized and allow you to store more stuff. By installing a ramp to the shed you can also store ATV, snowmobiles, jet skis, trailers, and such things.


If you plan to paint your shed, natural wood siding isn’t necessary. You can buy sheets of OSB (oriented strand board) siding at a fraction of the cost of real plywood, and it’ll probably last longer too. LP SmartSide panel is one brand. You can buy plain, grooved or stucco-like panels in several thicknesses and sizes. Ask at your local lumberyard to see what’s available.
Don’t assume that you’re missing something if you have a question that cannot be answered within the guidelines of the shed plans. Builders at all levels will always have questions and it is better to ask the question than miss something important in the process. Go online and find a forum or a video if you have a question. Better yet, read all the little print that you skipped over in your shed plan and see if the answer is there, it might be.
I like to use the hip roof design, it is pleasing to the eye, it is the best roof for high winds, certainlly a good idea with the hurricanes and tropical storms found in South Florida. I always build my sheds on a raised concrete slab for stability, I also use double hurricane ties. All studs and rafters are pressure treated because of the area's termite problems. I always anchor the shed to the concrete slab with expoy bolts. I never use T11 siding it does not hold up well in a subtropical climate. I use OSB under the siding and I often cross brace. I prefer a metal roof screwed down not nailed using water gasket screws. I generally use ridge vents or a wind turbine to help cool the shed and I also use Bahama shutters for the same reason. I build with rafters not trusses so I can keep the celling open to also cool the shed. This makes the shed expensive but after twenty years of use one of my oldest sheds which received proper up keep is still perfect. So which is cheaper one shed for life or one after every major windstorm? I know the answer because I had one shed stand up to a huricane!
Level the ground (if necessary) and install deck piers along a grid to support the shed. The piers will allow you to string support beams beneath the floor of the shed. In the example design, the piers are spaced 6 feet (1.8 m) apart in one direction and 4 feet (1.2 m) apart in the other for a total grid area of 12 x 8 feet. This is convenient because once you lay supports along this grid, it will take exactly three standard 4- by 8-foot plywood sheets to cover it.[1]
I have recently purchased a house with an older roof that needs to be restored soon. So, I am trying to decide on I should go with a metal roof other than shingles. If I install metal roofing over solid decking such as OSB or plywood, integrate with a properly insulated garret, there is very little noise difference compared to standard asphalt shingles. I have briefly read benefits and drawbacks of Metal roofing but as I listed before I should go to metal roofing and hiring a roofing contractor no matter its expensive or noisy anyhow, Your article has cleared a lot of misinterpretation I’ve had before.
A lean to shed is the perfect way to build up against a fence or wall and still have plenty of room in your yard. It also keeps water away from the structure you are building up against. The lean to shed design is the simplest design of shed to build because of its single plane sloping roof which makes the roof easy to build. We have many different configurations and sizes either with double or single doors. The larger lean to designs include optional plans to build the doors on any side of the shed. Our smaller lean to style sheds have a 4 in 12 pitch roof and our larger designs have a 2 in 12 pitch roof to keep the overall shed height lower and help reduce shed construction costs.
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