I like to use the hip roof design, it is pleasing to the eye, it is the best roof for high winds, certainlly a good idea with the hurricanes and tropical storms found in South Florida. I always build my sheds on a raised concrete slab for stability, I also use double hurricane ties. All studs and rafters are pressure treated because of the area's termite problems. I always anchor the shed to the concrete slab with expoy bolts. I never use T11 siding it does not hold up well in a subtropical climate. I use OSB under the siding and I often cross brace. I prefer a metal roof screwed down not nailed using water gasket screws. I generally use ridge vents or a wind turbine to help cool the shed and I also use Bahama shutters for the same reason. I build with rafters not trusses so I can keep the celling open to also cool the shed. This makes the shed expensive but after twenty years of use one of my oldest sheds which received proper up keep is still perfect. So which is cheaper one shed for life or one after every major windstorm? I know the answer because I had one shed stand up to a huricane!


They are the simplest and cheapest sheds one may find. They are easily assembled by regular people, they do not require initial construction knowledge. One may find the DIY kits and plans for these type of sheds. The most common type of sheds is plastic and wooden. They are mainly used to store garden tools, tractors and store items that are considered unsafe to be stored indoors such as gasoline and agricultural chemicals.
Normally we try to help our customers as much as possible, especially if it is a matter of helping to figure out where certain material goes on the building. Keep in mind, you are responsible for correctly constructing the shed if you purchase a kit, but we can offer direction. (Prior construction experience is recommended.) If there is any uncertainty about whether or not you will be able to assemble the storage shed, consider one of our build-on-site options and we will send a team to assemble the building for you.

It's a work in progress and likely a labor of love for Rob, aka Weekend Shed Head, who chronicles the construction of his backyard man cave in Nottingham, England, on his Instagram account and YouTube channel. An experienced and enthusiastic do-it-yourselfer, he sort of makes things up as he goes along and seems to know what he's doing. Along the way, Rob posts photos of train stations, the curry dinners and full English breakfasts he cooks, and charming flowers and decor in the garden.
Nobody knows your garden better than you. Nobody loves your garden as much as you. You would know how your garden, including its soil, surrounding plants and other elements, function in different weather conditions. Wouldn’t it make sense if you yourself decide what type of foundation to lay, how to ensure the shed’s stability keeping in mind the surroundings and the base?
· Personal belongings storage shed — as you are growing older each and every day, you may tend to accumulate so many items that congest your house. You may not want to throw or give away any of the items accumulated as they probably hold a sentimental value to you. The best way in which you can solve a headache is by building yourself a shed which you can be storing your personal items as you continue accumulating them.
· Wood sheds — these types of sheds are made of wood. They are the most common type of shed compared to metal and plastics. They are the most conducive as they can be used as children playhouses, outdoor office and still storage of garden tools. They are also easy to modify and renovate as increasing their size. They are preferred to other types as they blend well with the environment and give the environment a good natural look. However, they must be maintained regularly from insects as termites which feed on wood.
Each truss is made up of two 2 x 4 rafters and one 2 x 4 ceiling joist. The three boards are joined together with 1/2-in. plywood gussets. To speed up the assembly process, build all the trusses on the shed floor before erecting the walls. Start by cutting all the rafters to length with a 40° angle at one end of each. Cut 2 x 4s to 10 ft. long for the bottom chords of the trusses. Also, cut all of the plywood gussets.
The walls of the foundation have been created and the electrical is all set, now all that needs to be done is to fill the gaping hole in between them with limestone agrigate.  We also threw in some concrete paving stones that we had lying around because we don't plan on using them and we had already tried to give them away.  After the limestone is in place tamp it down by jumping on it and keep filling up any places that are no longer level.  After the entire base is filled with as much limestone as you can fit put a sprinkler on to soak it and set it for the next hour or so.  You may need to add a bit more limestone after this is done as well.
To be sure, the whole permitting process can be a bit intimidating. And, if I'm being honest here, I've never been comfortable dealing with the city and all their codes - seems they're always moving the line on me. But, I always make it a point to be friendly with the Building Inspector. He's there to help and can be a fountain of information, when building your wood shed.
Then, you will need to install a series of floor joists across the entire length of the support beams; these will need to be the same length as the distance between the two rim joints so that they’ll fit between them. In the example design, the floor joists are all separated by 14.5-inch gaps except for the outermost two, which are 13 3⁄4 inches (34.9 cm) from their immediate neighbors; this is to allow a standard piece of plywood to line up with the outermost edge of the outermost joist but only cover half of an interior joist, allowing its neighbor to cover the other half so that both can be supported properly.[3]
Now we can actually start building!  Before you start putting down cinderblocks, lay limestone screening down in all of the channels and run and burry your electrical.  Make sure that your electrical wires are clearly marked (we used caution tape) so that nobody digs them up accidentally in the future.  Once your all set, you can start putting down some cinderblocks.  You may need to break some cinderblocks in half, and this is easily done with a chisel, a hammer, and a bit of time.  Tip:  Set Rebar posts in each corner and tie strings across to help you keep the walls straight.  You need to check every single block for level, especially on this layer as the base of the foundation will affect the rest of the foundation and in turn affect the main structure.
Sheds are once in a while additionally re-recolored or varnished now and again for stylish and wood assurance reasons. Fire and, in a few areas, termite assault, are likewise potential issues. The damage to wooden sheds can be prevented by applying preservatives when they are exposed to rain, UV light, harsh climate, fungal attacks, insects etc. If you add oil or stain, the wood shed can be made to stand out in the garden given the style it can even blend with the surroundings. Some prominent type of woods like Cedar is resistant to water damage, naturally.
There are a lot of plans and designs to choose from when building the shed, so make sure you take a look over several alternatives before starting the actual construction. Invest in weather-resistant lumber (pressure-treated lumber), making sure all the components are in a good condition and perfectly straight. Drill pilot holes before inserting the screws, to prevent the wood from splitting.
Well I give this jerk credit for his pervasive techniques of getting people back to his website. If you see a review that says Ryans Shed Scam and click it it takes you to his website and it is not a website where you can read about his scam. THis is the biggest rip off I have ever fallen for. Everything is not as advertised. You get 2 plans bnot 12,000. You get lots of articles not books written in 1864, or 1903 and you like reading about obsolete, useless article then this is the plan for you. I am totally disgusted!!!!
Don Vandervort has developed his expertise for more than 30 years, as Building Editor for Sunset Books, Senior Editor at Home Magazine, author of more than 30 home improvement books, and writer of countless magazine articles. He appeared for 3 seasons on HGTV’s “The Fix,” and served as MSN’s home expert for several years. Don founded HomeTips in 1996.
Proceeding with your shed requires smart planning. For starters, you may need a permit from your local zoning authority and/or homeowners’ association to build a new structure on your property; check with the proper authorities before you even invest in the materials. Plus, there may be rules that dictate how you may use your shed, or whether you’re allowed to wire it for electricity. Once you get the go-ahead to build, you’ll want reliable guidelines. For anyone inclined to DIY rather than buy a prebuilt shed, look over a selection of free LP Outdoor Building Solutions plans based on your choice of size and roof style. Each set of plans comes with extensive material and hardware lists, detailed construction information, and tried-and-true building tips.
The female version of man caves is she sheds: havens to escape that can be designed and decorated in whatever style the owner desires. Inspired by a tiny hummingbird viewed nearby, this shed is aptly named Hummingbird Cottage. Lovely photos on Instagram reveal that the shed is used for art projects, as a retreat, displaying vintage pottery, and for entertaining friends. Extras like a hanging faux-crystal chandelier, potted flowering plants, wreaths, and stained glass give it a personal touch.
Ryan had a difficult time building his own first shed. Wrong material, wrong measures, wrong techniques, all of them didn’t help in making the shed any quicker. It took him 6 months to complete his first shed project, and at the end of it he was worn out and exhausted. Even after spending a lot of time reading and purchasing woodworking books, blueprints, nothing seemed to work. Most of the shed plans he bought lacked vital information which left him with more questions than answers. That is when he decided to leave it all aside and build his own shed plans. That was the beginning of his work towards building his master collection of shed plans.

The Roofs of the sheds usually come in different shapes, sizes, and styles. One impeccable style among then is the Gambrel Roof, highly associated with barns and pole barns. The advantage of adopting this style is that these sheds can be used as high capacity storage spaces because of the steeper sides. Most of the recent homes have Gambler Roof Sheds because of the intricate beauty they bring to the home. Instead of bringing a standard roof, it won’t make much difference to bring a Gambrel Roof, given that you match the materials to your building.​
Now we can actually start building!  Before you start putting down cinderblocks, lay limestone screening down in all of the channels and run and burry your electrical.  Make sure that your electrical wires are clearly marked (we used caution tape) so that nobody digs them up accidentally in the future.  Once your all set, you can start putting down some cinderblocks.  You may need to break some cinderblocks in half, and this is easily done with a chisel, a hammer, and a bit of time.  Tip:  Set Rebar posts in each corner and tie strings across to help you keep the walls straight.  You need to check every single block for level, especially on this layer as the base of the foundation will affect the rest of the foundation and in turn affect the main structure.

First off, building your own shed through our free or PREMIUM shed plans means you are saving the cost of a professional. If you are wondering you have zero experience in wood working then you shouldn’t be worried; our plans come with precise instructions, material list, diagrams, instructions, etc. There would be absolutely nothing that would leave you wondering.
Because most DIY manuals and plans are written by ghostwriters who don’t know anything about carpentry, it is common to find incomplete guides. This package is different. Ryan has spent time and effort ensuring that his expertise is laid out in a way that anyone can follow. After all, he is an educator. You also save because the plans make sure you don’t waste material.
Before we can finish the base we need to get the electrical ready.  Put a peice of conduit over your electrical wire to protect it from any damage it could receive while you are finishing the base and to give the shed a more finished look.  Make sure the pipe and wire inside are pointing up perpendicular to the ground and are preferably going straight to the location where your first outlet will be. 
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