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A 1964-built Eichler home was bought in original condition with vintage appliances, fixtures, and finishes. The new owners wanted to retain its iconic midcentury modern design but requested that Gast Architects make some updates to create a calm, light-filled, and inviting home. Gast strived to preserve the signature finishes of the house while creating a larger, more modern kitchen, opening up the floor plan, and updating the master suite. The shed in the backyard repeats the lines of the main house, resembling a mini Eichler.
To be honest, I almost named this project “How to Build a Shed from Scratch with your Spouse and Not Bury them Under the Concrete.” Working together as a team in life is one thing, but working together on a home DIY project is another. It’s like being on a drunken see-saw with “stay out here and work with me, but don’t get in my way.” Or, “keep me company, but don’t talk to me” How about, “just play with the kids while I work but keep them away from what I’m working on” Or even “Get me this tool, get me that tool, where are my tools? Don’t touch the tools” As it turns out that title is just a bit too wordy anyway, so I had to shorten it up a bit.
So it's not surprising that people often ask me for advice about putting together a backyard storage building. Sometimes I get asked questions that I couldn't possibly answer: "Do you think my husband and brother-in-law can build me a garden shed?" Or, "Would an 8 x 10-ft. shed be big enough to store all my stuff?" Gee, ma'am, I couldn't say. But often, the questions have something to do with shed design, framing or siding options. There, I can help. And so with these inquisitive souls in mind I present my favorite tricks of the shed trade.
Don’t assume that you’re missing something if you have a question that cannot be answered within the guidelines of the shed plans. Builders at all levels will always have questions and it is better to ask the question than miss something important in the process. Go online and find a forum or a video if you have a question. Better yet, read all the little print that you skipped over in your shed plan and see if the answer is there, it might be.
Build the framework for all four walls. To account for the fact that the front and back walls are different from each other (due to the doorframe in the front) and the side walls must both be sloped (to prevent rain from collecting on the roof), each of these will have to be tackled somewhat differently. It’s easiest to construct the back first, the front second, and the two sides last, as shown in the numbered image below. See How to Frame a Wall for more information before you read the instructions below.[5]

how to build a shed

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