Build your own shed and you'll instantly have increased space for your tools, a place to work on DIY projects and a way to keep your garage free of clutter. There are many shed plans online that show you how to build your own shed from scratch using wood. It may be easier, however, to use a kit to create a resin, metal or plastic shed instead. A storage shed kit contains all the materials you need including trim. This Home Depot project uses the Keter Stronghold Resin Shed Kit to show you how to build a shed from a kit. We also offer a large variety of other types of shed designs to choose from. Like most, this DIY shed requires tools like a power drill and step ladder to put it together, but assembly instructions will vary by kit. Make sure to follow the manufacturer's instructions carefully.
Now we can actually start building!  Before you start putting down cinderblocks, lay limestone screening down in all of the channels and run and burry your electrical.  Make sure that your electrical wires are clearly marked (we used caution tape) so that nobody digs them up accidentally in the future.  Once your all set, you can start putting down some cinderblocks.  You may need to break some cinderblocks in half, and this is easily done with a chisel, a hammer, and a bit of time.  Tip:  Set Rebar posts in each corner and tie strings across to help you keep the walls straight.  You need to check every single block for level, especially on this layer as the base of the foundation will affect the rest of the foundation and in turn affect the main structure.
When you nail on the siding, make sure it overhangs the framing on each side by 3-1/2 in. and that you’ve trimmed off the top corner to follow the slope of the angled top plate (Photo 2). Attach the siding with 2-in. galvanized or stainless steel ring-shank siding nails placed 8 in. apart along studs and 6 in. apart along the edges of the sheets. You’ll have to nail blocking between the studs to support the top edge of the siding and the Z-flashing.
At times, this information may seem overwhelming. You need to consider buying a program that provides you with all the information in a simple and concise manner. It is important to understand the value of your effort, money and time. One of the most common and biggest problems with online tutorials and guides is that they give just a glimpse of what you are buying. Thus, you don’t have a clear idea of what you are getting into.
Lastly, as I conclude this guide, I would recommend you to sign up for the ultimate e-book on shed building plans. It has been very useful book for me. Initially, I found shed building quite a hard task that one could only hire people to do it for you, but ever since I read it has changed my perspective on things concerning shed building. The e-book makes shed building look as easy as it can get. The e-book gives quite clear guides that are easy to understand. It gives the various shed building plans which are well elaborated and precise. I have also learned the difference and the best ways you may use to build great sheds that meet your needs. If you would like to gain a vast knowledge of shed building, do not miss this golden opportunity by signing up for the e-book!
For example, the last three sheds I built were trimmed with white PVC trim boards instead of painted cedar 1 x 4s. This new plastic lumber, which I used for the rake, fascia, frieze and corner boards, is impervious to bugs, warping, splitting or decay, and it never needs painting. Other low-maintenance options include: vinyl or aluminum windows, faux-slate roof shingles, fiberglass or steel doors, composite decking for steps, and fiber-cement siding. (I don't usually recommend aluminum or vinyl siding for sheds; neither material is rugged enough to survive the inevitable beating outbuildings take.)
Because the shed is designed to abut to another structure, the foundation need only be pressure-treated skids, the roof pitched in only one direction to shed water, and the back wall sheathed with 1/2-inch CDX plywood, which withstands indirect exposure to moisture. See Anatomy of an Outdoor Shed or Playhouse for more about typical shed construction.
The Glidetop Slide Lid shed from Suncast features an ultra tough resin construction that makes it one of the most long lasting and easy to maintain sheds on the market. The gliding lid makes walk-in access quite easy, and the reinforced floor makes the shed perfect for tractor support. Perfect for storing all kinds of things, like patio furniture, mowers, bikes, and wheelbarrows. It’s easy to lock the shed and protect everything inside, year-round. The extra secure roof on the Suncast is what makes it really stand apart from its competition. It doesn’t stand too tall, so if you need to keep your shed below fence level then this is the ideal model for you. Suncast is one of the leaders in durable, affordable sheds, and this model is a great choice if you’re looking to save a little money and still have a storage unit that is going to last you for years to come. The assembly of the Suncast is incredibly easy and requires minimal tools to set-up. 

• Stagnant waters — As much as the wood is coated to protect it from water, it would still be advisable to keep the wood away from stagnant waters. This is as the wood coating is not a permanent coat and so is the wood is exposed to water it will get damaged over time. The best way to avoid water paddles near the shed is building gutter systems on its roof which directs the water to a tank or a pool.

When you’ve decided on a shed location, dig two trenches 16 in. wide, 12 in. deep and 13 ft. long. Center the trenches 66 in. apart. Fill the trenches with a 3-in. layer of gravel and compact it with a hand tamper. Repeat this process until the trench is full. Use a level and long board to level the top layer of gravel. If the ground is flat, also make sure the gravel beds in the two trenches are level with each other.


There are over 12,000 different shed plans and woodworking endeavours for you to choose from, so the projects are pretty much endless. You are given everything you could possibly need to build your own beautiful outdoor shed. For those who already have years of woodwork and carpentry experience, My Shed Plans may not offer you enough information that you don’t already know. The only benefits you’ll get from the package are the innovative shed blueprints and designs, which can be help enough.

Sheds have become multipurpose, must-have buildings that are competing with pergolas and gazebos as your next backyard project. Pictures on social media only grab people's desires more. Before going any further, do your research. Figure out what you need it for and why, and whether you will build the shed yourself, or hire a pro. Check with your local planning department to comply with codes and guidelines. Determine if the shed will mirror the architectural features of your home--always a good idea. Assess your budget, materials needed, and the time it will take to complete the project.


Finding MyShedPlans seemed too good to be true; 12k shed plans, 3-D renderings, detailed material lists, but wait, there's more! Hundreds of useful guides, woodworking books, and project ideas ranging from birdhouses to bridges. And what was more, was the promise of an easy download and immediate access to boundless amounts of material so I could be right on my way to a sharp new shed.
Also square the frame by making sure diagonal measurements from opposite corners are equal. Then tack one corner to hold it square. Finally, nail the soffit to the roof frame with 6d galvanized box nails. We used 12-in.-wide fiber cement siding for soffit material. Mount an inexpensive carbide blade on your circular saw to cut the fiber cement. Set the roof panel aside and build the other half of the roof using the same techniques.
Don Vandervort has developed his expertise for more than 30 years, as Building Editor for Sunset Books, Senior Editor at Home Magazine, author of more than 30 home improvement books, and writer of countless magazine articles. He appeared for 3 seasons on HGTV’s “The Fix,” and served as MSN’s home expert for several years. Don founded HomeTips in 1996.
Before a hammer hits a nail: plan, plan, and plan some more. All too often people visit local home centers to get shed ideas. They go inside the prebuilt sheds in the parking lot and decide their own storage needs right then and there. Even worse, they'll grab a few brochures and use those ideas to find a shed design online without doing any proper space planning.
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