We now need to create a base that we can nail the frames for the walls into.  We did this with four 2x8's and some bent i-bolts along with a lot of mortar.  The basic process was that we bent the bottoms of the i-bolts after heating them with a blow torch, and then anchored these in some of the holes in the cinderblocks with a lot of mortar.  Then we drilled holes in the 2x8's where the i-bolts were and put these on top and screwed them in.  The frames can now be solidly attached to the base with the framing hammer.

A shed could double as a greenhouse, in which case you can use the shed plans provided on instructables. In this particular case, the shed was built out of old windows. An old window isn’t exactly something you can repurpose easily but here it’s a perfect fit. The first step is to gather enough windows. After that, it’s time to build the frame and you’ll need some wood for this part. Make sure the foundation is secure before you screw in the windows.
A tool shed is pretty easy to build. We found this inspiring example on thecavenderdiary which, as you can see, has a pretty straight-forward, traditional look. It has its back on the wall and inside there’s not much worth mentioning, except maybe for those practical storage hooks, shelves and rods on the inside of the doors. Check out the plans for this toolshed and find a way to customize them according to your own storage needs.
So I recommend paying for the basic package, browsing the terrible selection of blueprints, saving the URL, then demanding a full refund. You'll get all your money back, plus you can keep all the crummy blueprints you purchased. Just make sure you contact ClkBait (or whoever they are) directly, Ryan's shed goons will try to stall your refund if you go through them.
The front wall has a 6-foot-long top plate and two 1-foot-long bottom plates, leaving space for a 4-foot-wide door. The four wall studs are 81 1/4 inches long; install them as shown in the front framing detail at left. Next, install the 73-inch-long jack studs, and then attach the 51-inch-long doubled header. Finally, attach the 6 1/4-inch-long cripple studs.
Build the framework for the back wall. Make the top and bottom beams (a.k.a. the plates) the same length as the length of the floor which they sit. To keep your measurements simple, make the spacing between the vertical studs identical to the spacing between your floor joists. Note that the back wall should be lower than the front wall so that the roof slopes and directs rain away from the door.[6]

Before you exert effort in finding the woodworking company with the best shed plans, it is very important that you determine first the right type of shed that will suit your purpose. Now, aside from the purpose, there are other things to consider like the area where to put the shed (shed plans 12×16), the things that you will store in the shed, the appropriate building materials to use, the kind of environment or the weather in your place, and of course, safety issues. Will the shed be also used for the family’s recreational activities, or for workshops and meetings, or for some business ventures? Purchase shed plans because they can help in answering some of our important questions about this matter.
First, a cute little shed that we found on ladygoats. It’s made of wood, like most sheds, and it has no windows. It’s great for storage but it’s also a nice idea for a workspace. You can turn it into a gardening shed, a place to keep all the tools and to get some things done while working in the garden. We love its simplicity and the fact that it has a playful character and a pretty chic look for a shed. It’s all in the details. In this case, it’s the roof and the hardware that make all the difference.
Water is wood's worst enemy. Given the right circumstance and enough time, excessive moisture can rot framing, warp floors and doors, corrode hinges and breed mold and mildew. Fortunately, there's an easy remedy. First, be sure that the lowest wood member--the mudsill--is at least 6 in. above the ground. That's sufficient space to allow fresh air to circulate under the shed.

This garden shed is the tiniest, but that’s the beauty of it – it’s exactly the right size to store your gardening tools. As there are more details (all in order to give you more storaging options), it might take a little longer to build this shed than the others, also the makers of the plan have said it cost around $400 to build this, but the shed is definitely one of a kind and worth the efforts.
There are several ways to economize when building a shed: Install three-tab roof shingles instead of architectural shingles, or use grooved-plywood siding in place of cedar bevel siding. But don't ever skimp on the building materials used for the floor frame or plywood floor deck. I can't tell you how often I've walked into a shed and found the floor to be dangerously spongy. One building in particular had a floor so badly rotted it felt like one of those inflatable moonwalk attractions you see at carnivals.
Omit the bird’s-mouth from four rafters and use these on the ends. Cut the 2x4s for the ridge and subfascia to length and mark the rafter positions on them. Line up the rafters with the marks and nail through the ridge and subfascia with 16d nails to secure them. When the roof frame is complete, line up the subfascia with the chalk line on the platform and tack it in three or four places with toe screws to hold the frame straight while you install the soffit.
To be sure, the whole permitting process can be a bit intimidating. And, if I'm being honest here, I've never been comfortable dealing with the city and all their codes - seems they're always moving the line on me. But, I always make it a point to be friendly with the Building Inspector. He's there to help and can be a fountain of information, when building your wood shed.
For the masonry of the foundation we went out and bought 15 cinderblocks, and suplemented these with clay bricks that we got for free off of kijiji and some concrete pavestones from a neighbor's old patio.  Clay bricks can only be used above ground, other wise they will erode.  Looking back, it would have been easier to simply use cinderblocks and we strongly recommend it if you don't have other materials to get rid of.  Also, buy more mortar than you think you will need.  We ended up using a lot of mortar and if you have any extra you can always return it or pour it in the cinderblocks like we did to make the foundation even stronger.

It’s unconventional, but building the roof upside down on the platform has advantages. First, you avoid a lot of ladder work. And second, you can nail the soffit material to the overhangs easily without having to work overhead and in cramped spaces. You do have to take a little extra care to make sure the framing is square and the perimeter 2x4s are perfectly straight before nailing on the soffit, though. Start by cutting out the rafters using the pattern in Figure D as a guide.
We now need to create a base that we can nail the frames for the walls into.  We did this with four 2x8's and some bent i-bolts along with a lot of mortar.  The basic process was that we bent the bottoms of the i-bolts after heating them with a blow torch, and then anchored these in some of the holes in the cinderblocks with a lot of mortar.  Then we drilled holes in the 2x8's where the i-bolts were and put these on top and screwed them in.  The frames can now be solidly attached to the base with the framing hammer.

Before a hammer hits a nail: plan, plan, and plan some more. All too often people visit local home centers to get shed ideas. They go inside the prebuilt sheds in the parking lot and decide their own storage needs right then and there. Even worse, they'll grab a few brochures and use those ideas to find a shed design online without doing any proper space planning.


A thing you might want to check is if regulations require a minimum setback from the property line. This is often overlooked and come back to bite you. A silly thing I found out when I built my shed, my jurisdiction in California treats buildings differently depending on what they are called on the permit. I called my shed a barn because I built a gambrel roof and it looked like a barn. My surprise....A barn must be 50 feet away from any structures occupied by humans. A shed can be almost against the house.....same size, same shape,,,just different names.
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