Wait, I am not over yet. Ryan backs up his collection of shed plans with a very bold money back guarantee. It applies to everyone. You do not have to be an expert woodworker to be able to benefit from this collection. In fact, any person with our without the basic woodworking skills can benefit from it. And in case, you are not satisfied with the material you get in the ‘My Shed Plan’, you can put a claim for a refund and you will get all your money back. No questions asked. You have the time to look at the collection for 60 days and if even after that you are not happy, it won’t cost you a dime.

· Tool storage shed — they are used to store the tools that a homeowner may need to maintain their home compounds. They may be installed with ramps at their entrance to make it easier for storage of heavy items. They are also conducive for storage of bicycles and yard tools. Your compound, therefore, looks neat as the untidy yard tools are kept indoors.


• Lack of harmony — building a shed that does not match the design or the color of your house would make the compound look a bit odd. It is advisable that you choose a suitable architectural design and color that will closely match with your house. That gives your compound a great look and also makes it look like both structures were built at the same time. It also gives you a sense of satisfaction and hence you will not have to waste money in the future to make one structure resemble the other.
Please Note: Prices, promotions, styles and availability may vary by store and online. Inventory is sold and received continuously throughout the day; therefore, the quantity shown may not be available when you get to the store. This inventory may include a store display unit. Online orders and products purchased in-store qualify for rebate redemption. Mail-in Rebate is in the form of merchandise credit check, valid in-store only. Merchandise credit check is not valid towards purchases made on MENARDS.COM®. By submitting this rebate form, you agree to resolve any disputes related to rebate redemption by binding arbitration and you waive any right to file or participate in a class action. Terms and conditions available at www.rebateinternational.com®
The plan features not only a cutting list and project diagram. There are also clear instructions starting from building the base and ending with installing the windows and doing the trims. Once you’ve built a small shed like this, you’ll have enough experience to build a bigger one that fits all the garden equipment as well. A tiny shed like this though is a necessary item for every home!
For a freestanding shed, you can build the shed on top of a concrete slab (see Pouring a Concrete Slab) instead of the pressure-treated skids and floor joists; this will actually result in a sturdier—more permanent— structure. Otherwise, for a freestanding shed, the foundation should be constructed on concrete piers or poured footings (see Pouring Concrete Footings & Piers).  Be aware that building on footings will raise the height of the shed up from the ground.
A shed is a simple roofed single floor structure that is used for storage of garden tools, shelter domestic animals, performing out hobbies and also as a workshop. They can also be referred to as outhouse, outbuilding or shack. They are mostly situated in the back garden. Sheds vary in their sizes from large sheds to small sheds depending on their purposes. Storage sheds are mostly small in size but industrial and farm sheds are mostly large depending on the volume of the goods they hold. Sheds can be built from different materials like wood, metals, and plastic. The types of shed construction include metal sheathing, plastic sheathing, and complete wood construction.
We built the Colonial-style garden shed shown here from a set of mail-order building plans. The 10 x 16-ft. outbuilding has easy-to-install plywood siding, three large windows and two pairs of doors. The entire building could be used for storage, but we decided to divide the interior space into two separate areas: a 4 x 10-ft. tool-storage area and a 10 x 12-ft. children's playroom.
I did my wall studs and roof rafters at 24″ on center, so I used 2 x 6’s for the roof. Also, I made loft storage in the rafters of the front and back 5′ or so and left the middle 6′ or so open for access to the lofts and better lighting. I left the lower cords out in the middle trusses and reinforced them with hurricane ties and extra blocking. To better support the front and back loft floors I doubled up the lower cords on the front and back truss and on the two on either side of the opening and then floored the lofts with 2/4″ plywood. I also put four 14″ x 14″ plastic skylights in tht roof over the center open area to let additional light in.
If you don’t plan to have electricity running through your shed, this is the shed building tip you will want to listen to most. Windows easily brighten up a shed so you don’t have to hunt around for a flashlight or a lantern if you’re old school, every time you need to grab something from your shed. But…don’t go nuts and install a ton of windows or you will be giving up valuable space to hang tools or shelves.
A garden shed can be strictly functional, but it can also be a decorative focal point around which you design your garden or yard. These plans will help you build a basic shed, but don’t stop there! To customize your shed, you could create a combination toolshed and greenhouse, put a martin house on top, or use part of the shed for a chicken coop or rabbit hutch. If you’re feeling even more adventurous, you could create a living roof of moss or succulent plants.
The toughest and most important part of building a shed is finding the right plans. Sure you can just start building without plans, but do you know how it will look when you are done? Or you can search for free plans, but are they designed right? What I recommend is finding plans, even if it means you have to pay a little. Make sure that sample plans are provided so you know what you are getting. Do not make a purchase just because they show lots of nice sheds but no sample of the actual plans you will be buying. Look for the following before you decide to purchase:
Structurally speaking, some sheds are actually miniature versions of houses or barns. The gambrel storage shed plans from mybackyardplans explain the basic steps of such a project. First, the foundation is built. Then the sidewalls are installed, after that comes the roof frame, the front wall and the door, then the back wall and roof decking, the trim and finally the shingles. At the very end, the shed is painted.
The framing is the most important part of the above-ground structure because it stiffens up the plywood boards and supports the roof.  You will need a lot of 2x4's, and a way to attach them.  We used this as an excuse to buy some new air hammers from canadian tire.  We were able to get the lumber for the entire project delivered by a company called Tamrack Lumber.  They brought out a truck and dropped off all the supplies.  For the roofing you will need little plates with groups of nails sticking out of them which I believe are called joist plates.  These are used on the angles to keep them from shifting.  The last thing you will need is a way to cut all of the 2x4's.  To do this we borrowed a very nice miter saw from a friend for a few days.  It is much easier if the cutting tool can cut on angles, otherwise you will be left to improvise when cutting the peices for the roof.
The roof truss can be built using 2x4 or 2x6 lumbers. There are different ways to build the truss, the most common is cutting out the rafters and assembling them using gussets. The easiest way to build the roof truss will be using plans. The other option will be to lay the 2x4’s or 2x6’s on the level floor set them how you want your roof and make a template. Once you are happy with the look of your template you can build the rest.
Interesting lens. When I was growing up on a farm, I had to help when my father built a double-car garage, pighouse, machine shed, doubled the size of the barn etc. They all required foundations and he had us kids place rocks between the shovesl of concrete to save on the cost of cement. Please check out my "Flower Power" lens 'cause I need more Squid likes.
Working from ladders is more dangerous than working from scaffolding. Plus, having to constantly move ladders around is time consuming. When you get to the roof construction, consider renting a set of scaffolding with wheels. You’ll be amazed at how much easier it is to have a stable platform to work from and to set your tools and materials on. You can rent a 5-ft.-tall section of scaffold with three planks and wheels for about $110 per week.

DIY Shed Plans

×