Build your own shed and you'll instantly have increased space for your tools, a place to work on DIY projects and a way to keep your garage free of clutter. There are many shed plans online that show you how to build your own shed from scratch using wood. It may be easier, however, to use a kit to create a resin, metal or plastic shed instead. A storage shed kit contains all the materials you need including trim. This Home Depot project uses the Keter Stronghold Resin Shed Kit to show you how to build a shed from a kit. We also offer a large variety of other types of shed designs to choose from. Like most, this DIY shed requires tools like a power drill and step ladder to put it together, but assembly instructions will vary by kit. Make sure to follow the manufacturer's instructions carefully.
When you’ve decided on a shed location, dig two trenches 16 in. wide, 12 in. deep and 13 ft. long. Center the trenches 66 in. apart. Fill the trenches with a 3-in. layer of gravel and compact it with a hand tamper. Repeat this process until the trench is full. Use a level and long board to level the top layer of gravel. If the ground is flat, also make sure the gravel beds in the two trenches are level with each other.

For example, the last three sheds I built were trimmed with white PVC trim boards instead of painted cedar 1 x 4s. This new plastic lumber, which I used for the rake, fascia, frieze and corner boards, is impervious to bugs, warping, splitting or decay, and it never needs painting. Other low-maintenance options include: vinyl or aluminum windows, faux-slate roof shingles, fiberglass or steel doors, composite decking for steps, and fiber-cement siding. (I don't usually recommend aluminum or vinyl siding for sheds; neither material is rugged enough to survive the inevitable beating outbuildings take.)
Now we can actually start building!  Before you start putting down cinderblocks, lay limestone screening down in all of the channels and run and burry your electrical.  Make sure that your electrical wires are clearly marked (we used caution tape) so that nobody digs them up accidentally in the future.  Once your all set, you can start putting down some cinderblocks.  You may need to break some cinderblocks in half, and this is easily done with a chisel, a hammer, and a bit of time.  Tip:  Set Rebar posts in each corner and tie strings across to help you keep the walls straight.  You need to check every single block for level, especially on this layer as the base of the foundation will affect the rest of the foundation and in turn affect the main structure.

There are a number of considerations when it comes to choosing an outdoor storage shed for your home. There’s the question of price, design, climate, size, and more. To begin with, realize that you get what you pay for with a storage shed. Saving a few hundred bucks on the cheapest model might not make the most sense in the long-term. This means that you’re passing on quality siding materials like cedar and vinyl. Next, think about how you want the shed to look in your yard. We’ve all seen those classic storage sheds that are designed to have the same aesthetics of your home. For instance, rustic designs for a country-style home. These complementing designs can be quite charming, and allows the shed to stand out as an addition of your home. Another option is to have your shed bleed into the landscape by covering it with plants or by planting perennial beds around the unit.

Working from ladders is more dangerous than working from scaffolding. Plus, having to constantly move ladders around is time consuming. When you get to the roof construction, consider renting a set of scaffolding with wheels. You’ll be amazed at how much easier it is to have a stable platform to work from and to set your tools and materials on. You can rent a 5-ft.-tall section of scaffold with three planks and wheels for about $110 per week.

DIY Shed Plans

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