First off, building your own shed through our free or PREMIUM shed plans means you are saving the cost of a professional. If you are wondering you have zero experience in wood working then you shouldn’t be worried; our plans come with precise instructions, material list, diagrams, instructions, etc. There would be absolutely nothing that would leave you wondering.
My Shed Plans just might be every do-it-yourself junkie’s dream product. Ryan Henderson, the creator of My Shed Plans, has been building one-of-a-kind outdoor sheds for more than 20 years. If you believe his story, he has unselfishly decided to share his love of woodworking and carpentry through his guides which will enable the everyman who does not have handyman experience to build their very own outdoor shed. Can it be true?
Ryan’s Shed Plans is going to turn you into the ultimate builder – a builder of sheds, a builder of greenhouses, a builder of tiny homes, and a builder of many things. And nope, no previous experience is needed. This unique online program breaks down the steps to building over 12,000 different types of sheds in such a way that anyone can build the shed of their dreams, sans all the frustration and confusion that often comes with most woodworking projects. It’s like a “Building For Dummies” guide that teaches you the accurate steps needed to build everything from a garden shed to a storage shed, greenhouse, and more. So, if you’re tired of finding building plans that are missing steps, that don’t make sense or worse, that don’t accurately list the measurements or tools needed, you need to give Ryan’s Shed Plans a look.
You can build the walls on any flat surface, but the shed platform is ideal. Snap chalk lines on the plywood deck, 3-1/2 in. from the edges of the platform, to indicate the inside edge of the walls. Measure to make sure the lines are parallel and 89 in. apart. Then chalk a line down the center (Photo 1). You’ll use this line to make sure the angled top plates meet in the center.
The construction of a wood foundation is usually built using pressure-treated 2x6 lumbers. These parts are called the band on the ends and the joist in the middle of the band, spaced out 16-24 inches apart. The foundation frame will sit on top of pressure-treated 4x4 posts called skids. The skids will set on the cinder blocks or on top of gravel to prevent rot.
As you can see, I have no pictures of the doors being created.  This is because they took way too much trouble to make, and I didn't really have the patience to take pictures of them being built because they were tested and redone about 3 times.  Lesson to be learned:  leave the tolerances bigger than you think they will need to be, you can always use weather strips to help close them up later.  After 3 attempts, we finnally got the doors to work properly.  The one door is held in place with sliding dead-bolts to the floor and ceiling frames and the second door is attached to it with another dead-bolt.
Working from ladders is more dangerous than working from scaffolding. Plus, having to constantly move ladders around is time consuming. When you get to the roof construction, consider renting a set of scaffolding with wheels. You’ll be amazed at how much easier it is to have a stable platform to work from and to set your tools and materials on. You can rent a 5-ft.-tall section of scaffold with three planks and wheels for about $110 per week.

· Gambrel styled shed — it is a very common type of shed. Its roof is highly steep and is four sided. This type of shed at some point resembles a hexagon. This type of shed is preferred as the shape of its roof makes the interior of the shed to be spacious hence creating more space where a lot of garden and outdoor tools can be stored. In this type of shed, one may have a workshop in the shed. They can even accommodate a car due to their large spaces. 

When you start to look at the plans, you realize some are absurdly out of date, or impossible to read because they are blurred - just like everyone else has reported on this site. What was even more appalling was it appeared most, if not all of what I had purchased, was easily available for free online. Some material looked as though it may have been pilfered - or "borrowed without permission or attribution from educational sites. And much of the "VIP-Premium" content was past its copyright - which is great if you want a children's woodworking book from the 1800's for historical purposes, which I'm sure is a fascinating read, but all that was ultimately meaningless since the sum total of what I downloaded offered nothing of any immediate benefit toward building a shed from a quality, step-by-step plan, with 3-D renderings, Material lists, and best practices, etc to help you build quickly, efficiently, and have something you can use and be proud of. I think the only proprietary plans must the the freebie they give away to entice you to pony up.
Edrington used recycled and repurposed materials to build the shed. Restored garage doors were used for the south wall to allow light to filter through, good for seedlings. The floors are made of recycled brick on sand. A pull-down ladder leads to the second floor, where the architect built beds and tables as a cozy sleeping nook for his grandchildren. In the afternoons, Edrington and his wife enjoy a cup of tea in the shed.
Proceeding with your shed requires smart planning. For starters, you may need a permit from your local zoning authority and/or homeowners’ association to build a new structure on your property; check with the proper authorities before you even invest in the materials. Plus, there may be rules that dictate how you may use your shed, or whether you’re allowed to wire it for electricity. Once you get the go-ahead to build, you’ll want reliable guidelines. For anyone inclined to DIY rather than buy a prebuilt shed, look over a selection of free LP Outdoor Building Solutions plans based on your choice of size and roof style. Each set of plans comes with extensive material and hardware lists, detailed construction information, and tried-and-true building tips.
Normally we try to help our customers as much as possible, especially if it is a matter of helping to figure out where certain material goes on the building. Keep in mind, you are responsible for correctly constructing the shed if you purchase a kit, but we can offer direction. (Prior construction experience is recommended.) If there is any uncertainty about whether or not you will be able to assemble the storage shed, consider one of our build-on-site options and we will send a team to assemble the building for you.
Among our builder plans, we have developed a wide range of shed designs, which we offer in form of DIY plans. If you purchase them, you will receive a detailed shed blueprints and building instructions, from the foundations to the roof, with precise measurements in both metric and imperial systems and full list of materials required for the shed. Our garden sheds, storage sheds and gazebo plans are created in a way to make the construction process comprehensive and easy to build for anyone. Especially easy are the lean-to shed plans, narrow but spacious, very practical and possible to attach to any building or wall.
To make it easier for you, the “do-it-yourself” storage shed kits are for sale partially prefabricated to make the assembly of the shed barn kit simple and straightforward. The DIY storage shed kit walls are assembled and the rafters are prebuilt and ready to put into place. While we offer large shed kits as well as small barn kits, on the smaller 6′ and 8′ shed kits, the floor may be partially constructed to make the job even easier.
Since the shade is an outdoor structure, it will face various weather elements like sunshine, rain, snow, wind and other factors as insects and moulds. If you are not sure on the wood selection, it would be better to seek advice from a wood expert who will guide you through the best wood you would use to build your shed depending on the climate your region experiences.
The construction of a wood foundation is usually built using pressure-treated 2x6 lumbers. These parts are called the band on the ends and the joist in the middle of the band, spaced out 16-24 inches apart. The foundation frame will sit on top of pressure-treated 4x4 posts called skids. The skids will set on the cinder blocks or on top of gravel to prevent rot.
A saltbox shed is defined by its double sloping roof style. The front roof has a steep slope of 12/12, and the rear roof has a lower slope of 5/12. Most plans have options for the doors on either the front or side. Click on the images to view more details. The saltbox style evolved from the practice of extending the second floor roof line down to the first floor level to create additional covered living space. The design adds a south eastern flair to back yard shed designs.

Don’t assume that you’re missing something if you have a question that cannot be answered within the guidelines of the shed plans. Builders at all levels will always have questions and it is better to ask the question than miss something important in the process. Go online and find a forum or a video if you have a question. Better yet, read all the little print that you skipped over in your shed plan and see if the answer is there, it might be.
Now that the skeleton of your roof is ready, it’s to go pro. You will be adding roof felt and shingles to make your roof robust, resilient and obviously good looking. Metal roof sheets, fiberglass and felt are some of the basic options you have. Feel free to use any material you like for the roofing. However, we recommend using felt since it is easier to work with and install, and is highly weather and water resistant.
We found all the materials to build this shed at our local home center. Most of the construction is straightforward and requires only standard carpentry tools and a circular saw. For how to build the shed windows and door, you’ll also need a table saw, power miter saw and router. We used a Kreg pocket hole jig and pocket hole screws to assemble the door and windows. Another really great thing about small storage sheds such as this on, it don’t take as long to build! With a helper or two, you could have the platform and shell built in two or three days. Then expect to spend four or five more days completing the siding, trim, doors, windows and roofing.
When building the floor frame, which includes the mudsill, floor joists and perimeter band joists, use 2 x 6 or 2 x 8 pressure-treated lumber. Many prefab sheds use untreated construction-grade lumber for the floor frame, which is fine--if you plan to keep your shed indoors. Even in ideal conditions on the perfect site, a shed floor will be exposed to some moisture, and in time, untreated lumber will rot.
To be honest, I almost named this project “How to Build a Shed from Scratch with your Spouse and Not Bury them Under the Concrete.” Working together as a team in life is one thing, but working together on a home DIY project is another. It’s like being on a drunken see-saw with “stay out here and work with me, but don’t get in my way.” Or, “keep me company, but don’t talk to me” How about, “just play with the kids while I work but keep them away from what I’m working on” Or even “Get me this tool, get me that tool, where are my tools? Don’t touch the tools” As it turns out that title is just a bit too wordy anyway, so I had to shorten it up a bit.
I just want to let you know that your Driver was a pleasure to deal with. He placed the shed perfectly into a tight spot and then took the time to make sure it was level and sitting properly. I feel any other company would of placed it as close as possible to where i wanted it and would of been on their way. He also noticed (I would of never noticed) that the door didn't line up perfectly when closed and made some adjustments.
In a perfect world, all of the studs would be straight, but since they aren’t, make sure to pick the best ones to use at corners and at door and window openings. Sight down the length of the studs and set aside the ones that are perfectly straight. While you’re at it, also set aside studs that are really crooked. You can cut these up to use as cripples or blocking. You may find other uses for short pieces later on.
The roof panels are heavy and a bit awkward, so round up three strong helpers for this part of the job. Move the panels into position and lean them against the front and back walls. Then set up ladders inside the building for two helpers and push one of the panels up to them. Slide the panel up the roof until the bird’s-mouths drop over the top plate of the wall.
How big should a garden shed be so it can be practical without occupying more space than it has to? Well…it depends. I think this cute little garden shed from acultivatednest has one of the smallest possible footprints. The fact that it’s small but tall allows it to be quite practical. It’s great for the storage of garden tools and there’s even some room for a shelf or two or for a few hooks on the walls.

First, a cute little shed that we found on ladygoats. It’s made of wood, like most sheds, and it has no windows. It’s great for storage but it’s also a nice idea for a workspace. You can turn it into a gardening shed, a place to keep all the tools and to get some things done while working in the garden. We love its simplicity and the fact that it has a playful character and a pretty chic look for a shed. It’s all in the details. In this case, it’s the roof and the hardware that make all the difference.
If you don’t plan to have electricity running through your shed, this is the shed building tip you will want to listen to most. Windows easily brighten up a shed so you don’t have to hunt around for a flashlight or a lantern if you’re old school, every time you need to grab something from your shed. But…don’t go nuts and install a ton of windows or you will be giving up valuable space to hang tools or shelves.

Run! Do not walk away from this product! Total scam! The Ryan Shed Plans product promises 12,000 different do it yourself shed building plans. Instead what you get is a whole bunch of disconnected sketches, drawings, And partial blueprints that he has photo copied from hundreds of unrelated sources. I personally have several years of carpentry, homebuilding, and woodworking experience So I assumed that even if these so-called “shed building plans” we’re light on specific details I’d still be able to use them. WRONG! You will find that 99% of the“Plans“ are completely useless for the purpose of building a backyard shed. After an hour of grinding through the files included in that on my download, I did happen upon a singly reasonably complete building plan for a modest shed which included detail dimensions, material list, and the sorts of things needed to actually build a shed. Doing a little more research, I later found where this particular we’ll Drawn to plan had been ripped off from another legitimate Shed building website. Shame on you RyanShedPlans for marketing such a terrible, useless product. Judging from your online sales pitch you are clearly a gifted marketer. If you spent as much time developing a database of legitimate, usable shed plans as you did putting together your totally fraudulent marketing material, you would have an incredible product worth much much more then you’re charging. But I guess you I already know that.

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